put

verb
\ ˈpu̇t \
put; putting

Definition of put

 (Entry 1 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to place in a specified position or relationship : lay put the book on the table
b : to move in a specified direction
c(1) : to send (something, such as a weapon or missile) into or through something : thrust
(2) : to throw with an overhand pushing motion put the shot
d : to bring into a specified state or condition a reapportionment … that was put into effect at the September primariesCurrent Biography
e : to prescribe a specified regimen for usually used with on put her on medicationput him on a diet
2a : to cause to endure or suffer something : subject put traitors to death
b : impose, inflict put a special tax on luxuries
3a : to set before one for judgment or decision put the question
b : to call for a formal vote on put the motion
4a(1) : to convey into another form want to put my feelings into words
(2) : to translate into another language or style put the poem into English
(3) : adapt lyrics put to music
b : express, state putting it mildly
5a : to devote (oneself) to an activity or end put himself to winning back their confidence
b : apply put her mind to the problem
c : assign put them to work
d : to cause to perform an action : urge put the horse over the fence
e : impel, incite put them into a frenzy
6a : repose, rest puts his faith in reason
b : invest entry 1 sense 1 put her money in the company
7a : to give as an estimate put the time as about eleven
b : attach, attribute puts a high value on their friendship
c : impute put the blame on the partners
8 : bet, wager put $2 on the favorite

intransitive verb

1 : to start in motion : go especially : to leave in a hurry
2 of a ship : to take a specified course put down the river
put forth
1a : assert, propose
b : to make public : issue
2 : to bring into action : exert
3 : to produce or send out by growth put forth leaves
4 : to start out
put forward
: propose put forward a theory
put in mind
: remind
put one's finger on
: identify put his finger on the cause of the trouble
put one's foot down
: to take a firm stand
put one's foot in one's mouth
: to make a tactless or embarrassing blunder
put paid to
chiefly British
: to finish off : bring an end to
put the arm on or put the bite on
: to ask for money
put the finger on
: to inform on put the finger on … heroin pushers— Barrie Zwicker
put the make on
: to make sexual advances toward
put to bed
: to make the final preparations for printing (something, such as a newspaper)
put together
1 : to create as a unified whole : construct
2 : add, combine

put

noun

Definition of put (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : a throw made with an overhand pushing motion specifically : the act or an instance of putting the shot
2 : an option to sell a specified amount of a security (such as a stock) or commodity (such as wheat) at a fixed price at or within a specified time — compare call sense 3d

put

adjective

Definition of put (Entry 3 of 3)

: being in place : fixed, set stay put until I call

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Examples of put in a Sentence

Verb

Put the car in the garage. I put the keys on the table. He put his arms around her and held her tight. He fell and accidentally put his hand through a window. The illness put her in the hospital for three days. They put her in prison for forgery. Her parents decided to put her in a special school for deaf children. If she drove 55 mph for 20 minutes, that would put her about halfway there by now. Don't forget to put your signature on the check. He put his phone number on a napkin.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Initial estimates put the cost of a tunnel between $3.4 billion and $4.1 billion and the time to build between seven and nine years. Michelle Baruchman, The Seattle Times, "A look back at the Alaskan Way Viaduct as its demise — and the new Highway 99 tunnel — draw near," 7 Jan. 2019 Lili Reinhart put her most fashionable foot forward on the Golden Globes red carpet tonight. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Lili Reinhart Turns Up the Heat in a Red Gown at the 2019 Golden Globes," 7 Jan. 2019 Starring alongside Jennifer Coolidge — who portrayed Paulette in the original film — the pair put their spin on the moment that Paulette asks for her ex to return her dog. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "Ariana Grande Recreated Another "Legally Blonde" Scene in the "Thank U, Next" Blooper Video," 4 Jan. 2019 In 2012, prominent science fiction scholar Gary K. Wolfe put together a magnificent pair of novel collections for Library of America: American Science Fiction: Nine Classic Novels of the 1950s. Andrew Liptak, The Verge, "All the science fiction and fantasy books we’re looking forward to in 2019," 30 Dec. 2018 Trump eventually put an end to family separation with an executive order after weeks of backlash. Amanda Sakuma, Vox, "John Kelly’s exit interview lifts the curtain on the chaos within the Trump White House," 30 Dec. 2018 Again, nothing fancy here: Sony just put its head down and made a product that is technically proficient and presents immediately obvious benefits to consumers. Ron Amadeo, Ars Technica, "Our favorite (and least favorite) tech of 2018," 26 Dec. 2018 Travis Lanier, Qualcomm’s senior director of product management, put it simply: The Snapdragon 855 will deliver 45 percent more performance than the 845 in the Kryo GPU, and 20 percent more performance in the Adreno GPU. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Meet Qualcomm's Snapdragon 855: AI boosts, a smarter camera, mobile gaming—and bye-bye, JPEG," 5 Dec. 2018 But Australia, which has put whale sanctuaries in place to protect Antarctic populations, took Japan to the International Court of Justice and won a suit over the practice. John Timmer, Ars Technica, "Japan restarting commercial whaling, ignoring global moratorium," 26 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Those lessons are getting put to the test during the shutdown. Celeste Katz, Glamour, "These Women Are Still Waiting for Their Paycheck Because of the Government Shutdown," 11 Jan. 2019 Magic Words: Reaching out to reach in puts everything in its right place. Bess Matassa, Teen Vogue, "Weekly Horoscopes October 15-21," 13 Oct. 2018 Inmates at the Ridgeland Correctional Institution in Jasper County are also staying put. Barnini Chakraborty, Fox News, "South Carolina refusing to evacuate inmates as monster storm Florence nears," 12 Sep. 2018 Navigating the chaotic schedule that is New York Fashion Week is challenging enough—but try looking put-together while show-hopping in perilous weather conditions, too. Christian Allaire, Vogue, "Gigi Hadid Lets Down Her Hair—and Has a Major Wind Machine Moment in New York City," 9 Sep. 2018 When one major company does something, that kind of puts pressure on the others. NBC News, "After Starbucks, which company will next ban plastic straws?," 9 July 2018 Shot Put In addition to her seventh-place showing in the discus, Mason's King also took home a third-place showing in the shot put. Scott Springer, Cincinnati.com, "Meet of champions: Here are Greater Cincinnati's OHSAA track and field champions," 2 June 2018 Butler, a senior has cerebral palsy and competes in the shot put. Matthew Vantryon, Indianapolis Star, "At the Unified track meet, everyone wins. 'The inclusion revolution is happening.'," 2 June 2018 Wakefield’s lone individual victory came on a throw of 52-8¼ from Patrick Redmond in the shot put. Josh Schafer, BostonGlobe.com, "Emotional victory for Stoughton’s David Peters in Division 3 outdoor track championship," 26 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Their relationship was put front and center during Mr. Trump’s order to punish the Syrian regime for the deaths of 75 people in what was widely seen as a chemical weapons attack by Damascus. Gordon Lubold, WSJ, "Russia-U.S. Military Ties Strengthen While Political Ties Fray," 14 July 2018 Check out 20 soft trousers that are just as comfortable as your favorite sweats, only a bit more put-together. Ana Colón, Glamour, "20 Soft Knit Trousers That Are Basically Just Fancy Sweatpants," 23 Oct. 2018 While neither team looked nearly as smooth in the quarter’s first few minutes, a Klay Thompson 2-pointer with 9:12 left put Golden State up by 9 points. Benjamin Hoffman And Marc Stein, New York Times, "N.B.A. Finals 2018: Warriors Roll Over Cavs in Game 2," 4 June 2018 Comcast Ventures, a unit of the company that invests into startups, put seed capital into Accolade after seeing Accolade’s results with Comcast employees, Spann said. Bob Fernandez, Philly.com, "Accolade, with 500 employees in Plymouth Meeting, seeks to boldly cut health costs for big companies," 12 July 2018 Symantec, the company that makes the Norton Security suite of antivirus products, released a report in 2017 that showed that 87 percent of respondents had at some point potentially put information at risk while using public Wi-Fi. Sebastian Modak, Condé Nast Traveler, "How to Keep Your Data Safe While Traveling," 7 June 2018 Theft Shareen George, 26, of Todor Court, Burr Ridge, was charged at 12:24 p.m. March 8 with retail theft after a security officer at Walmart, 2189 75th St., saw her put merchandise into her purse and leave the store without paying. Kimberly Fornek, chicagotribune.com, "Police blotter: Darien woman charged with driving under influence of drugs, driving without headlights and in the wrong lane," 18 Mar. 2018 Battling the rain, Jenner looked put-together and chic with a crossbody bag and red nail polish. Samantha Leal, Marie Claire, "Caitlyn Jenner Goes Out in Knee-High Boots, Looks Amazing," 12 June 2015 Last week, Oakland’s mayor warned residents of an impending immigration raid — a move that Trump called disgraceful and said put law enforcement officers at risk. Washington Post, "Trump’s visit to California comes amid frayed relations," 12 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'put.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of put

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1841, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for put

Verb

Middle English putten; akin to Old English putung instigation, Middle Dutch poten to plant

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Statistics for put

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for put

The first known use of put was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for put

put

noun

Financial Definition of put

What It Is

A put is a financial term that refers to a put option, or a contract between the buyer and seller of a securities option allowing the buyer to force the seller (or the writer of the option contract) to buy the security. The term also means, in a generic sense, the option to make another party purchase something.

How It Works

In options trading, a buyer may purchase a short position (i.e., the expectation that the price will go down) on a security. This position gives the buyer the right to sell the underlying security at an agreed-upon price (i.e. the strike price) by a certain date. If the market price falls below the strike price, as expected, the buyer can decide to exercise his or her right to sell at that price and the writer of the option contract has the obligation to buy the security at the strike price. With the exercise of the put, the trader makes the difference between the cost of the security in the market (i.e., a lower price than the option strike price) and the sale of the option to the put writer (i.e., at the strike price).

For example, if a trader purchases a put option contract for Company XYZ for $1 (i.e., $.01/share for a 100-share contract) with a strike price of $10 per share, the trader can sell the shares at $10 before the end of the option period. If Company XYZ's share price drops to $8 per share, the trader can buy the shares on the open market and sell the put option at $10 per share (the strike price on the put option contract). Taking into account the put price of $.01/share, the trader will earn a profit of $1.99 per share.

In a generic context, to put something means to force the purchase of something. For example, you might buy a piece of real estate, and the seller might negotiate the right to put a second parcel to you at a later date if land prices do not increase by then.

Why It Matters

The ability to put an asset is essentially like having an insurance policy. If prices aren’t great later, at least you can force someone to take the asset off your hands for a set price. Alternatively, puts can also be risky. If someone has the right to put something to you later, you run the risk of having to buy something down the road that you didn’t plan on buying. Investors will often purchase a put option on shares they already own to act as a hedge against the decline in the share price. Puts and calls are the key types of options trading.

Source: Investing Answers

put

verb
\ ˈpu̇t \
put; putting

Kids Definition of put

1 : to place in or move into a particular position She put the book on a table. Put your hand up.
2 : to bring into a specified state or condition The charity puts the money to good use. He put the room in order.
3 : to cause to undergo something Our class puts them to shame.
4 : to give expression to I can't put my fear into words. This book puts the idea clearly.
5 : to devote to or urge to an activity They can improve if they put their minds to it. The coach is putting us to work.
6 : to think of as worthy of : attribute The candidate puts a high value on peace.
7 : to begin a voyage The ship put to sea.
put away
: to take in food and drink She put away a big dinner.
put down
1 : to bring to an end by force Police put down the riot.
put forward
: propose sense 1 The committee put forward a new plan.
put in
1 : to ask for She put in for a job.
2 : to spend time in a place or activity I put in two hours of work.
put off
: to hold back to a later time : defer I put off my appointment.
put on
1 : to dress in He put a new jacket on.
2 : pretend sense 2 She put on a show of anger.
3 : produce entry 1 sense 4 The senior class put on a play.
put out
1 : extinguish sense 1 Be sure to put out the light.
2 : irritate sense 1, annoy I was put out by their behavior.
3 : make entry 1 sense 1 The factory puts out tires.
4 : to cause to be out (in baseball)
5 : to make use of The team put out a real effort.
put together
1 : to create as a whole : construct
2 : to consider as a single unit “… Mr. Rice taught me more than all my other teachers put together.”— Katherine Paterson, Jacob Have I Loved
put up
1 : build entry 1 sense 1 The town plans to put up a new school.
2 : to make (as food) ready for later use I put vegetables up for the winter.
3 : to give or get shelter and often food They often put tourists up.
4 : to make by action or effort They put up a good fight.
put up to
: to urge or cause to do something wrong or unexpected Those kids put me up to the prank.
put up with
: to stand for : tolerate I won't put up with any more of his nonsense.

put

noun

Legal Definition of put

: put option at option 3

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More from Merriam-Webster on put

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for put

Spanish Central: Translation of put

Nglish: Translation of put for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of put for Arabic Speakers

Comments on put

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