foot

noun
\ ˈfu̇t How to pronounce foot (audio) \
plural feet\ ˈfēt How to pronounce feet (audio) \ also foot

Definition of foot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the terminal part of the vertebrate (see vertebrate entry 1) leg upon which an individual stands
2 : an invertebrate organ of locomotion or attachment especially : a ventral (see ventral entry 1 sense 1b) muscular surface or process of a mollusk
3 : any of various units of length based on the length of the human foot especially : a unit equal to ¹/₃ yard and comprising 12 inches plural foot used between a number and a noun a 10-foot pole plural feet or foot used between a number and an adjective 6 feet tall — see Weights and Measures Table
4 : the basic unit of verse meter consisting of any of various fixed combinations or groups of stressed and unstressed or long and short syllables Each line of the poem contains five feet.
5a : motion or power of walking or running : step fleet of foot
b : speed, swiftness showed early foot
6 : something resembling a foot in position or use: such as
a : the lower end of the leg of a chair or table
b(1) : the basal portion of the sporophyte in mosses
(2) : a specialized outgrowth by which the embryonic sporophyte especially of many bryophytes absorbs nourishment from the gametophyte
c : a piece on a sewing machine that presses the cloth against the feed
7 foot plural, chiefly British : infantry
8 : the lower edge (as of a sail)
9 : the lowest part : bottom the foot of the hill
10a : the end that is lower or opposite the head the foot of the bed
b : the part (as of a stocking) that covers the foot
11 foots plural in form but singular or plural in construction : material deposited especially in aging or refining : dregs
12 foots plural : footlights
at one's feet
: under one's spell or influence The champion loved the feeling that the world was at his feet.
foot in the door
: the initial step toward a goal He took a job as a secretary to get his foot in the door.
off one's feet
: in a sitting or lying position The doctor advised her to stay off her feet.
on foot
: by walking or running tour the campus on foot
on one's feet
1 : in a standing position He works on his feet all day.
2 : in an established position or state The business is finally back on its feet.
3 : in a recovered condition (as from illness) back on my feet
4 : in an extemporaneous (see extemporaneous sense 1a) manner : while in action good debaters can think on their feet
to one's feet
: to a standing position brought the crowd to its feet

foot

verb
footed; footing; foots

Definition of foot (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : dance
2 : to go on foot
3 of a sailboat : to make speed : move

transitive verb

1a : to perform the movements of (a dance)
b : to walk, run, or dance on, over, or through

2 archaic

a : kick
b : reject
3 archaic : establish
4a : to add up
b : to pay or stand credit for foot the bill
5 : to make or renew the foot of foot a stocking

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Synonyms & Antonyms for foot

Synonyms: Noun

base, basement, bottom, nadir, rock bottom

Synonyms: Verb

ante (up), balance, clear, discharge, liquidate, meet, pay, pay off, pay up, pony up, quit, recompense, settle, spring (for), stand

Antonyms: Noun

head, top, vertex

Antonyms: Verb

repudiate

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Examples of foot in a Sentence

Noun

He was wearing boots on his feet. tracks made by the feet of a bird The people in the crowd began to stamp their feet. They camped at the foot of the mountain. at the foot of the stairs the foot of the table

Verb

I'll foot the bill for dinner.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The compact city is entirely navigable by foot, full of charming cobblestone streets, historic buildings, and shops selling the wares of local craftspeople. Nicola Fumo, Town & Country, "What to Pack for an Irish Getaway," 4 Mar. 2019 Raising dozens of islands by several feet is extremely expensive. Avery Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "To Save Themselves from Sea Level Rise, the Marshall Islands Want to Raise the Land," 26 Feb. 2019 Weight: Weight is an indicator of density, as it is measured by square foot. Lucia Tonelli, ELLE Decor, "The Best Carpet Types for a Perfectly Grounded Space," 13 Feb. 2019 We were separated by feet of cinder block walls or inches of Plexiglas. Jewel Wicker, Teen Vogue, "Penn Badgley Is Teaming Up With the Tahirih Justice Center to Help Vilma Carrillo, an Immigrant Mom Separated From Her Daughter," 21 Dec. 2018 Measuring 90 by 120 feet, this model is about the size of two basketball courts, the contours of the landscape laser-etched into 216 panels of white high-density foam. Nate Berg, Curbed, "Can engineering save Louisiana’s coastline?," 7 Nov. 2018 Cohen — and all new parents — deserve to get their parenting feet under them before the hordes descend and criticize what the parent may or may not be doing wrong. Marisa Lascala, Good Housekeeping, "Andy Cohen Was Just Dad-Shamed for Taking His Newborn on an Airplane," 12 Feb. 2019 Don’t leave candles unattended or within a foot of anything flammable. Kimberly Truong, SELF, "House Fires Are Way More Common in Winter—Here’s How to Stay Safe," 23 Jan. 2019 Let’s hear it for starting 2019 off on a very glamorous foot. Vogue, "The Best New Year’s Eve Looks: Gigi Hadid As Mary Poppins, Kylie Jenner’s Halter Dress," 1 Jan. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In 2017, the EPA proposed requiring companies still operating mines to post cleanup bonds or offer other financial assurances so taxpayers don’t end up footing cleanup bills. Matthew Brown, The Seattle Times, "50M gallons of polluted water pours daily from US mine sites," 20 Feb. 2019 Such leases help insulate landowners from the risks of developing and operating an office or residential rental property, and from footing bills for upkeep, tenant improvements or broker commissions. Keiko Morris, WSJ, "Ground Rents Weigh Down High-Soaring Icons," 22 Jan. 2019 While such loans are interest-free for shoppers and can spur them to make big-ticket purchases, retailers are in effect footing the financing costs. Stella Yifan Xie, WSJ, "Apple to Chinese Consumers: Buy a New iPhone for Under $30 a Month, Interest Free," 21 Feb. 2019 The border was re-opened a year later, but only to foot traffic. Manuel Rueda, The Seattle Times, "AP Explains: Cucuta, Colombia — The gateway into Venezuela," 4 Feb. 2019 In 1996, Chris arrived at a comedy club to interview the comedian Chris Rock, only to be told that 60 Minutes had big-footed PrimeTime for the booking—and the poacher had been Mike Wallace himself. Andrew Goldman, Town & Country, "Chris Wallace Is Fox News's Man in the Middle," 17 Nov. 2018 To be sure, this is a return to a Cold War footing in Europe. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "How Roads Could Win or Lose a War With Russia," 23 July 2018 Pyongyang has also lambasted Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono for suggesting Japan could foot part of the bill for inspections to verify the North's denuclearization process. Eric Talmadge, Fox News, "While making nice with US and Seoul, North Korea slams Japan," 23 July 2018 Pyongyang has also lambasted Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono for suggesting Japan could foot part of the bill for inspections to verify the North’s denuclearization process. Eric Talmadge, The Seattle Times, "While making nice with US and South, North Korea slams Japan," 23 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'foot.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of foot

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for foot

Noun and Verb

Middle English fot, from Old English fōt; akin to Old High German fuot foot, Latin ped-, pes, Greek pod-, pous

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Learn More about foot

Statistics for foot

Last Updated

12 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for foot

The first known use of foot was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for foot

foot

noun

English Language Learners Definition of foot

: the part of the leg on which an animal or person stands and moves : the part of the leg below the ankle
: a unit of measurement equal to ¹/₃ yard (0.3048 meter) or 12 inches
: the lowest part of something

foot

noun
\ ˈfu̇t How to pronounce foot (audio) \
plural feet\ ˈfēt \

Kids Definition of foot

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the end part of the leg of an animal or person : the part of an animal on which it stands or moves
2 : a unit of length equal to twelve inches (about .3 meter)
3 : the lowest or end part of something foot of a hill foot of the bed
on foot
: by walking They traveled on foot.

foot

verb
footed; footing

Kids Definition of foot (Entry 2 of 2)

2 : pay entry 1 sense 2 I'll foot the bill.

foot

noun
\ ˈfu̇t How to pronounce foot (audio) \
plural feet\ ˈfēt How to pronounce feet (audio) \ also foot

Medical Definition of foot

1 : the terminal part of the vertebrate leg upon which an individual stands
2 : any of various units of length based on the length of the human foot especially : a unit equal to ¹/₃ yard or 12 inches or 30.48 centimeters plural foot used between a number and a noun a 10-foot pole plural feet or foot used between a number and an adjective 6 feet tall

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More from Merriam-Webster on foot

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for foot

Spanish Central: Translation of foot

Nglish: Translation of foot for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of foot for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about foot

Comments on foot

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