move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a(1) : to go or pass to another place or in a certain direction with a continuous motion moved into the shade
(2) : to proceed toward a certain state or condition moving up the executive ladder
(3) : to become transferred during play checkers move along diagonally adjacent squares
(4) : to keep pace moving with the times
b : to start away from some point or place : depart It was getting late and I thought it was time to be moving.
c : to change one's residence or location decided to move to the city
2 : to carry on one's life or activities in a specified environment moves in the best circles
3 : to change position or posture : stir ordered him not to move
4 : to take action : act The time has come to make up your mind and move.
5a : to begin operating or functioning or working in a usual way pushed a button and the machine began moving
b : to show marked activity after a lull things really began to move
c : to move a piece (as in chess or checkers) during one's turn
6 : to make a formal request, application, or appeal moved that the meeting adjourn
7 : to change hands by being sold or rented goods that moved slowly
8 of the bowels : evacuate

transitive verb

1a(1) : to change the place or position of moved the chair to a different part of the room
(2) : to dislodge or displace from a fixed position : budge The knife had sunk deeply into the wood and couldn't be moved.
b : to transfer (something, such as a piece in chess) from one position to another moved the bishop to take the knight
2a(1) : to cause to go or pass from one place to another with a continuous motion move the flag slowly up and down
(2) : to cause to advance moved the troops closer to the enemy
b : to cause to operate or function : actuate this button moves the whole machine
c : to put into activity or rouse up from inactivity news that moved them from their torpor
3 : to cause to change position or posture moved his lips but not a sound was heard
4 : to prompt or rouse to the doing of something : persuade the report moved us to take action
5a : to stir the emotions, feelings, or passions of deeply moved by such kindness
b : to affect in such a way as to lead to an indicated show of emotion the story moved her to tears
6a obsolete : beg
b : to make a formal application to
7 : to propose formally in a deliberative assembly moved the adjournment motion
8 : to cause (the bowels) to void
9 : to cause to change hands through sale or rent The salesman moved three cars today.
move house
British : to change one's residence

move

noun

Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the act of moving a piece (as in chess)
b : the turn of a player to move
2a : a step taken especially to gain an objective : maneuver a move to end the dispute retiring early was a smart move
b : the action of moving from a motionless position
c : one of a pattern of dance steps
d : a change of residence or location
e : an agile or deceptive action especially in sports
on the move
1 : in a state of moving about from place to place
2 : in a state of moving ahead or making progress said that civilization is always on the move

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Choose the Right Synonym for move

Verb

move, actuate, drive, impel mean to set or keep in motion. move is very general and implies no more than the fact of changing position. moved the furniture actuate stresses transmission of power so as to work or set in motion. turbines actuated by waterpower drive implies imparting forward and continuous motion and often stresses the effect rather than the impetus. a ship driven aground by hurricane winds impel is usually figurative and suggests a great motivating impetus. a candidate impelled by ambition

Examples of move in a Sentence

Verb He moved the chair closer to the table. It may be necessary to move the patient to intensive care. The breeze moved the branches of the trees. The branches moved gently in the breeze. She was unable to move her legs. She was so frightened that she could hardly move. I moved over so that she could sit next to me. We moved into the shade. The police were moving through the crowd telling people to move toward the exit. We could hear someone moving around upstairs. Noun He made a sudden move that scared away the squirrel. an athlete who has some good moves The policeman warned him not to make any false moves. He was afraid to make a move. No one is sure what his next move will be. He's preparing for his move to California.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The parties have also agreed to move forward without an acting president and focus their efforts on holding legislative and presidential elections that have been scheduled for Sept. 26, Le Nouvelliste newspaper said, citing anonymous sources. Jim Wyss/bloomberg, Time, 19 July 2021 He's got some secondary pitches, some moxie and some feel for how to move the ball around and keep the ball on the ground. Evan Petzold, Detroit Free Press, 18 July 2021 Offensive funks hit every team and the good ones move past them quickly and get right back in a groove. Susan Slusser, San Francisco Chronicle, 18 July 2021 But the earlier sections move more slowly, and Silva paints a convincing portrait of a girl finding her way in the world — learning to trust her own feelings of injustice, unearthing a world of intellect and ideas via a friend’s father. Washington Post, 17 July 2021 Hall’s daughter lives with cerebral palsy, a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and maintain balance and posture. Matt Koesters, The Enquirer, 16 July 2021 That’s not likely to happen at this point, however, because other beavers would likely move into the area and continue the problem, Tessen said. Tess Williams, Anchorage Daily News, 15 July 2021 To keep safe, those impacted are advised to move to higher ground, shelter in place and never enter floodwaters. Julia Musto, Fox News, 15 July 2021 Making her Olympic debut in karate (women’s kata), Kokumai studied and worked in Japan prior to the Olympics, a decision that prompted her to move back to the United States and dedicate all of her time to training. Chris Bumbaca, USA TODAY, 14 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Ben & Jerry’s move on Monday may not be the final chapter in the saga. Wilson Ring And Josef Federman, The Christian Science Monitor, 20 July 2021 But Schumer's move has rankled some Republicans involved in the talks, who are pushing for the vote to be delayed, especially since legislative text has yet to be released. Melissa Quinn, CBS News, 20 July 2021 At least one senator had called Joseph’s move to run the country and impose a state of siege after the assassination a form of a coup. BostonGlobe.com, 19 July 2021 In internal messages about Hölzle’s move, some frustrated Google staff resurfaced an email from an ex-colleague native to New Zealand. oregonlive, 19 July 2021 At least one senator had called Mr. Joseph’s move to run the country and impose a state of siege after the assassination a form of a coup. New York Times, 19 July 2021 Australia’s move to head off China as a potential buyer was driven by security concerns, said John Lee, a senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. Stuart Condie, WSJ, 19 July 2021 Disneyland has been hustling to do more than just move benches. Los Angeles Times, 18 July 2021 One woman called my national radio show for help with a malicious stranger who stalked her daughter's every move. Kim Komando, USA TODAY, 18 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'move.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of move

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a(1)

Noun

1656, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for move

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French mover, moveir, from Latin movēre; probably akin to Sanskrit mīvati he moves, pushes

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Time Traveler for move

Time Traveler

The first known use of move was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near move

movable type

move

move ahead/along

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Statistics for move

Last Updated

21 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Move.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/move. Accessed 30 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for move

move

verb

English Language Learners Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (something or someone) to go from one place or position to another
: to go from one place or position to another
: to cause (your body or a part of your body) to go from one position to another

move

noun

English Language Learners Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of moving your body or a part of your body
: an action
: the act of moving to a different place

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Kids Definition of move

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to go from one place to another Let's move into the shade.
2 : to change the place or position of : shift Move your chair closer.
3 : to set in motion Come on, move your feet.
4 : to cause to act : persuade Your speech moved me to change my opinion.
5 : to affect the feelings of The sad story moved me to tears.
6 : to change position Stop moving until I finish cutting your hair.
7 : to change residence We moved to Illinois.
8 : to suggest according to the rules in a meeting I move to adjourn.

move

noun

Kids Definition of move (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the action of changing position, place, or residence a sudden move We're excited about our move to a new state.
2 : the act of moving a piece in a game
3 : the turn of a player to move It's your move.
4 : an action taken to accomplish something a career move

move

verb
\ ˈmüv How to pronounce move (audio) \
moved; moving

Medical Definition of move

intransitive verb

1 : to go or pass from one place to another
2 of the bowels : to eject fecal matter : evacuate

transitive verb

1 : to change the place or position of
2 : to cause (the bowels) to void

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move

verb
moved; moving

Legal Definition of move

intransitive verb

: to make a motion moved to seize the property

transitive verb

: to request (a court) by means of a motion moved the court to vacate the order

More from Merriam-Webster on move

Nglish: Translation of move for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of move for Arabic Speakers

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