adapt

verb
\ ə-ˈdapt , a- \
adapted; adapting; adapts

Definition of adapt 

transitive verb

: to make fit (as for a new use) often by modification adapt the curriculum to students' needs

intransitive verb

: to become adapted adapt to a new enviroment

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Choose the Right Synonym for adapt

adapt, adjust, accommodate, conform, reconcile mean to bring one thing into correspondence with another. adapt implies a modification according to changing circumstances. adapted themselves to the warmer climate adjust suggests bringing into a close and exact correspondence or harmony such as exists between parts of a mechanism. adjusted the budget to allow for inflation accommodate may suggest yielding or compromising to effect a correspondence. accommodated his political beliefs in order to win conform applies to bringing into accordance with a pattern, example, or principle. refused to conform to society's values reconcile implies the demonstration of the underlying compatibility of things that seem to be incompatible. tried to reconcile what he said with what I knew

Did You Know?

Rooted in the origins of "adapt" is the idea of becoming specifically "fit" for something. English speakers adapted "adapt" in the 15th century from the French adapter, which itself traces to the Latin forms aptare, meaning "to fit," and aptus, meaning "fit" or "apt." Other descendants of "aptus" in English include "aptitude," "inept," and of course "apt" itself, as well as "unapt" and "inapt."

Examples of adapt in a Sentence

When children go to a different school, it usually takes them a while to adapt. She has adapted herself to college life quite easily. The camera has been adapted for underwater use. The clock was adapted to run on batteries. The movie was adapted from the book of the same title. adapting the movie for television
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Recent Examples on the Web

Another source of optimism is the power of the brain to adapt to new signaling inputs. Justin Chen, STAT, "Pulses of light restored hearing in gerbils. Could that lead to higher-tech cochlear implants?," 11 July 2018 The extra verification work has slowed the counting, but the office is adapting and tweaking its processes, said Chief Deputy Secretary of State Tim Hurst. Nate Poppino, idahostatesman, "Medicaid supporters submit their signatures - and wait to hear if we'll vote this fall," 6 July 2018 The Kane County Fair adapts and tries new things too. Annie Alleman, Aurora Beacon-News, "County fairs are a throwback for bustling suburbs," 5 July 2018 Instead, companies need to adapt to a world that is VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) and which requires continuous innovation in order to keep up. The Economist, "The fashion for agile management is spreading," 5 July 2018 Roca is working with city officials and others to set goals for the next four years and standards for tracking performance to ensure the program can adapt to a new location and find success. Yvonne Wenger, baltimoresun.com, "Nonprofit Roca begins relentless pursuit of Baltimore's most dangerous young men — to change them," 4 July 2018 Things started to normalize Mona adapted to life in Canada and became a teacher's assistant at Queen's University. Karen Pilarski, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Brookfield company president's wife banned from entering United States," 2 July 2018 Games challenge players to adapt and dismantle the conventions under which people hide. Lindsay Grace, Smithsonian, "The Original ‘Space Invaders’ is an Icon of 1970s America’s Deepest Fears," 19 June 2018 Yarber is busy adapting to a leadership role this year while also getting familiar with Hess’ system. Paul Johnson, Elgin Courier-News, "Under new boys basketball coach David Hess, Elgin aims to keep pressure on opponents," 16 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adapt.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adapt

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adapt

Middle English adapted (as translation of Latin adaptātus), borrowed from Middle French & Latin; Middle French adapter, borrowed from Latin adaptāre, from ad- ad- + aptāre "to put into position, bring to bear, make ready," verbal derivative of aptus "fastened, prepared, suitable" — more at apt entry 1

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Dictionary Entries near adapt

Adapazarı

Adapidae

Adapis

adapt

adaptable

adaptate

adaptation

Statistics for adapt

Last Updated

7 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for adapt

The first known use of adapt was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for adapt

adapt

verb

English Language Learners Definition of adapt

: to change your behavior so that it is easier to live in a particular place or situation

: to change (something) so that it functions better or is better suited for a purpose

: to change (a movie, book, play, etc.) so that it can be presented in another form

adapt

verb
\ ə-ˈdapt \
adapted; adapting

Kids Definition of adapt

1 : to change behavior so that it is easier to function in a particular place or situation He easily adapted to high school.

2 : to make or become suitable or able to function The camera was adapted for underwater use.

\ ə-ˈdapt \

Medical Definition of adapt 

: to make fit (as for a specific or new use or situation) often by modification adapted himself to the new position

intransitive verb

: to become adapted : undergo adaptation

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Comments on adapt

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