urge

verb
\ ˈərj How to pronounce urge (audio) \
urged; urging

Definition of urge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to present, advocate, or demand earnestly or pressingly his conviction was upheld on a theory never urged at his … trial— Leon Friedman
2 : to undertake the accomplishment of with energy, swiftness, or enthusiasm urge the attack
3a : solicit, entreat urged him to keep trying
b : to serve as a motive or reason for urged by a sense of duty
4 : to force or impel in an indicated direction or into motion or greater speed the dog urged the sheep toward the gate
5 : stimulate, provoke urge not my father's anger— William Shakespeare

intransitive verb

: to declare, advance, or press earnestly a statement, argument, charge, or claim urged for the adoption of the proposal

urge

noun

Definition of urge (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act or process of urging
2 : a force or impulse that urges especially : a continuing impulse toward an activity or goal

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Other Words from urge

Verb

urger noun

Examples of urge in a Sentence

Verb He is continually urging reform. The rescuers urged that we remain calm. an editorial urging readers to vote I urge you to reconsider. A hand on her back urged her forward. Noun the urge for something sweet He fought the urge to cry.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Trans advocates urge cisgender people to go beyond being allies and become advocates. Samara Lynn, ABC News, "Transgender in tech: More visibility but obstacles remain," 31 Mar. 2021 The group will urge police to pause operations of specialized forces, such as the Gun Recovery Unit and crime suppression squads, seen in some District neighborhoods as oppressive. Washington Post, "Commission studying policing in the District to recommend sweeping changes," 23 Mar. 2021 The league will strongly urge, but not require, players and staff to get vaccinated once state regulations allow access. Gabe Lacques, USA TODAY, "'The line should go away': As restrictions ease, pro athletes are on deck for COVID-19 vaccination," 23 Mar. 2021 Different states, different agencies and different experts urge varying levels of caution. Erin Alberty, The Salt Lake Tribune, "How close is Utah to having the coronavirus ‘under control?’," 22 Mar. 2021 More recently, nonunion fast-food workers have focused on demonstrations to attract public attention and urge lawmakers to raise the minimum wage. Caitlin Harrington, Wired, "Some Amazon Drivers Have Had Enough. Can They Unionize?," 19 Mar. 2021 Noah is among several entertainment luminaries who have condemned the rise in anti-Asian violence and urge authorities to recognize the Atlanta attacks as a hate crime. Christi Carras, chicagotribune.com, "Trevor Noah on Atlanta shootings: ‘If that’s not racism ... the word has no meaning’," 18 Mar. 2021 Noah is among several entertainment luminaries who have condemned the rise in anti-Asian violence and urge authorities to recognize the Atlanta attacks as a hate crime. Christi Carras, Los Angeles Times, "Trevor Noah on Atlanta shootings: ‘If that’s not racism ... the word has no meaning’," 18 Mar. 2021 Doing so will increase the chances that others in our circles will adopt COVID-fighting behaviors and urge those in their social spheres to do the same. Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Scientific American, "How to Debunk Misinformation about COVID, Vaccines and Masks," 18 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The company expects an onslaught of demand for the limited number of tickets, one indication of consumers’ urge to resume activities after 12 months of stay-at-home orders and business restrictions. Erich Schwartzel, WSJ, "Disney to Reopen Parks in California on April 30," 17 Mar. 2021 As human beings, we are wired to react when attacked, but don’t give in to that urge. Ellevate, Forbes, "Six Ways You Can Choose To Challenge Yourself On This International Women's Day," 4 Mar. 2021 McConnell vowed to support her regardless of the former president's urge for Republicans to reject those who voted in favor of slapping charges against him. Jake Dima, Washington Examiner, "Mitch McConnell, with focus on the 'future,' says he didn't watch Trump's CPAC comeback speech," 3 Mar. 2021 Behind this mask, meanwhile, the true Tom is wrestling with the urge to punch you in the [expletive] face. Margaret Gray, Los Angeles Times, "Review: The one-man show for Angelenos sick of everybody who loves New York," 23 Dec. 2020 As everyone with any urge to read this far likely knows, the 1980s were a very important time in the history of computing. Jason Torchinsky, Ars Technica, "How an obscure British PC maker invented ARM and changed the world," 20 Dec. 2020 But the urge to socialize as the city tries to pull off hosting the entire men's college basketball tournament simply proved too strong for many Hoosiers, even those who recognize the potential risks of COVID-19. Holly V. Hays, The Indianapolis Star, "Health experts: Packed crowds at 2021 NCAA Tournament could create uptick in COVID cases," 21 Mar. 2021 During lockdown, the urge to write memoirs seems to have reached epidemic proportions. Peter Funt, WSJ, "An Epidemic of Memoir-Writing," 21 Mar. 2021 The white supremacy that threatens to tear the country down while strangling the rest of the globe has proved inseparable from an ecocidal urge to dominate all forms of planetary life. Ben Ehrenreich, The New Republic, "We’re Hurtling Toward Global Suicide," 18 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'urge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of urge

Verb

circa 1555, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

circa 1618, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for urge

Verb

Latin urgēre to press, push, entreat — more at wreak

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Statistics for urge

Last Updated

4 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Urge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/urge. Accessed 10 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for urge

urge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of urge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to ask people to do or support (something) in a way that shows that you believe it is very important
: to try to persuade (someone) in a serious way to do something
: to use force or pressure to move (someone or something) in a particular direction or at a particular speed

urge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of urge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong need or desire to have or do something

urge

verb
\ ˈərj How to pronounce urge (audio) \
urged; urging

Kids Definition of urge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to try to get (something) accepted : argue in favor of She's always urging reform.
2 : to try to convince He urged his guests to stay.
3 : force entry 2 sense 1, drive His dog urged the sheep onward.

urge

noun

Kids Definition of urge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong desire She had the urge to laugh.

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More from Merriam-Webster on urge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for urge

Nglish: Translation of urge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of urge for Arabic Speakers

Comments on urge

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