urge

verb
\ ˈərj How to pronounce urge (audio) \
urged; urging

Definition of urge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to present, advocate, or demand earnestly or pressingly his conviction was upheld on a theory never urged at his … trial— Leon Friedman
2 : to undertake the accomplishment of with energy, swiftness, or enthusiasm urge the attack
3a : solicit, entreat urged him to keep trying
b : to serve as a motive or reason for urged by a sense of duty
4 : to force or impel in an indicated direction or into motion or greater speed the dog urged the sheep toward the gate
5 : stimulate, provoke urge not my father's anger— William Shakespeare

intransitive verb

: to declare, advance, or press earnestly a statement, argument, charge, or claim urged for the adoption of the proposal

urge

noun

Definition of urge (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the act or process of urging
2 : a force or impulse that urges especially : a continuing impulse toward an activity or goal

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Other Words from urge

Verb

urger noun

Examples of urge in a Sentence

Verb He is continually urging reform. The rescuers urged that we remain calm. an editorial urging readers to vote I urge you to reconsider. A hand on her back urged her forward. Noun the urge for something sweet He fought the urge to cry.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The group’s organizers seek input from community members to urge decision-makers to create a new economic road map for the state. USA TODAY, "Casinos, churches, contact tracing: News from around our 50 states," 22 May 2020 President Xi Jinping is using the country’s success — and the criticism against it — to urge the party and the people to weather tough days ahead. Victoria Shannon, New York Times, "Vaccines, U.S. Reopenings, Flour Frenzy: Your Thursday Briefing," 21 May 2020 Trump has been trying to urge its use for months now. David Meyer, Fortune, "The man who made Moderna," 19 May 2020 Some Alaskans have begun holding rallies to urge a second dividend. James Brooks, Anchorage Daily News, "Veto fights and dividend struggles sank Alaska Legislature’s attempt to speed pandemic aid," 18 May 2020 State officials continue to urge Oregonians to avoid all non-essential travel, including day trips, and for those in urban areas to not travel more than 50 miles from home to recreate. oregonlive, "More state parks reopen on the Oregon coast, from Lincoln City to Florence," 15 May 2020 Haiti, for its part, has established a presidential panel to urge ICE to halt the flights, and Florida Congresswoman Federica Wilson has introduced a bill to cease them entirely. Laura Weiss, The New Republic, "Trump’s Deportation Flights Are Inflaming the Pandemic," 14 May 2020 Nirenberg and County Judge Nelson Wolff continue to urge residents to wear their masks in most public settings and to maintain a 6-foot social distance from others out in public to help ensure there’s no resurgence of the deadly disease. Elizabeth Zavala, ExpressNews.com, "Novel coronavirus cases total cracks 2,000 in San Antonio area; one more death at nursing home reported," 14 May 2020 Alabama’s fastest-growing city, Fairhope, in neighboring Baldwin County, are urging residents to stop irrigating their lawns, while water levels are at alarming low levels. al, "Wildfire and water restrictions: ‘Severe drought’ impacting coastal Alabama," 14 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The urge to get outside and do some driving hits today. BostonGlobe.com, "Horoscope," 5 May 2020 Of course, in this disconnect between urge and action, a fecund interiority awaits. Sara Lippmann, Washington Post, "Anna Solomon’s ‘Book of V’ will please fans of ‘The Hours’ with its sprawling take on a biblical tale," 4 May 2020 The answer that leapt out is suddenly relevant to our coronavirus shutdown: In almost every case, the urge to collude arose from a desire to maintain industrial capacity that had become temporarily uneconomic. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "Government Punts to Business," 1 May 2020 But the urge to engage with performance, whether as actor or audience member, isn’t going away. Matt Wolf, New York Times, "To Restart After Lockdown, Theaters Need to Think Small," 30 Apr. 2020 Dallasites with the urge to let their hair down -- perhaps scoffing at rules forcing residents to stay at home -- face increased scrutiny from their neighbors and, possibly, code enforcement or police. Cassandra Jaramillo, Dallas News, "‘Corona’ parties, loud music disturbances are up during shelter-in-place orders," 3 Apr. 2020 Resist the urge to panic, and instead verify your loved one’s whereabouts, Stokes says. oregonlive, "Liz Weston: Seeing elderly relatives over the holidays? Here are popular scams to put on their radar," 23 Dec. 2019 Even for those with permission, the urge to see the city slowly wanes, eventually dying out. Diane Grosklaus Whitty, Harper's magazine, "Senior Portrait," 16 Sep. 2019 From her point of view, that urge to explore is partly why winegrowers came to the mountains in the first place. Fortune, "Napa Mountain Wines Have Just as Much to Offer as Napa Valley Bottles," 8 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'urge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of urge

Verb

circa 1555, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

circa 1618, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for urge

Verb

Latin urgēre to press, push, entreat — more at wreak

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Time Traveler for urge

Time Traveler

The first known use of urge was circa 1555

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Statistics for urge

Last Updated

27 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Urge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/urge. Accessed 28 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for urge

urge

verb
How to pronounce urge (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of urge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to ask people to do or support (something) in a way that shows that you believe it is very important
: to try to persuade (someone) in a serious way to do something
: to use force or pressure to move (someone or something) in a particular direction or at a particular speed

urge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of urge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong need or desire to have or do something

urge

verb
\ ˈərj How to pronounce urge (audio) \
urged; urging

Kids Definition of urge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to try to get (something) accepted : argue in favor of She's always urging reform.
2 : to try to convince He urged his guests to stay.
3 : force entry 2 sense 1, drive His dog urged the sheep onward.

urge

noun

Kids Definition of urge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong desire She had the urge to laugh.

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More from Merriam-Webster on urge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for urge

Spanish Central: Translation of urge

Nglish: Translation of urge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of urge for Arabic Speakers

Comments on urge

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