all

adjective
\ ˈȯl How to pronounce all (audio) \

Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : the whole amount, quantity, or extent of needed all the courage they had sat up all night
b : as much as possible spoke in all seriousness
2 : every member or individual component of all men will go all five children were present
3 : the whole number or sum of all the angles of a triangle are equal to two right angles
4 : every all manner of hardship
5 : any whatever beyond all doubt
6 : nothing but : only all work and no play :
a : completely taken up with, given to, or absorbed by became all attention
b : having or seeming to have (some physical feature) in conspicuous excess or prominence all legs
c : paying full attention with all ears
7 dialect : used up : entirely consumed used especially of food and drink
8 : being more than one person or thing I don't know who all is coming.
all the
: as much of … as : as much of a … as all the home I ever had

all

adverb

Definition of all (Entry 2 of 4)

1a : wholly, quite sat all alone often used as an intensive all out of proportionall over the yardit wasn't all that funny
b : selected as the best (as at a sport) within an area or organization used in combination all-league halfback
2 obsolete : only, exclusively
3 archaic : just
4 : so much all the better for it
5 : for each side : apiece the score is two all

Definition of all (Entry 3 of 4)

1a : the whole number, quantity, or amount : totality all that I have all of us all of the books
b used in such phrases as for all I know, for all I care, and for all the good it does to indicate a lack of knowledge, interest, or effectiveness
2 : everybody, everything gave equal attention to all that is all
all in all
: on the whole : generally all in all, things might have been worse
and all
: and everything else especially of a kind suggested by a previous context cards to fill out with … numbers and all— Sally Quinn

all

noun

Definition of all (Entry 4 of 4)

: the whole of one's possessions, resources, or energy gave his all for the cause

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Synonyms & Antonyms for all

Synonyms: Adjective

concentrated, entire, exclusive, focused (also focussed), undivided, whole

Synonyms: Adverb

all of, all over, altogether, clean, completely, dead, enough, entire, entirely, even, exactly, fast, flat, full, fully, heartily, out, perfectly, plumb [chiefly dialect], quite, soundly, thoroughly, through and through, totally, utterly, well, wholly, wide

Synonyms: Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

everybody, everyone

Antonyms: Adjective

diffuse, divided, scattered

Antonyms: Adverb

half, halfway, incompletely, part, partially, partly

Antonyms: Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

nobody, none, no one

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Choose the Right Synonym for all

Adjective

whole, entire, total, all mean including everything or everyone without exception. whole implies that nothing has been omitted, ignored, abated, or taken away. read the whole book entire may suggest a state of completeness or perfection to which nothing can be added. the entire population was wiped out total implies that everything has been counted, weighed, measured, or considered. the total number of people present all may equal whole, entire, or total. all proceeds go to charity

Examples of all in a Sentence

Adjective

I've been waiting all week to see her. He had to walk all the way home. She works all year round. He'll need all the help he can get. Someone took all the candy.

Adverb

She has traveled all around the world. This money will be all yours when I die. She had buttons all down the side of her dress. I forgot all about paying the bill. The kids got all excited when they saw Santa Claus.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Garnett and Rondo are seemingly still giving Allen the silent treatment, even though players in the NBA switch teams quite literally all the time. Rohan Nadkarni, SI.com, "The Most Notable NBA Feuds This Past Decade," 17 Sep. 2019 Of all the efforts that people could make to help the climate, why focus on food? Kate Wheeling, The New Republic, "Jonathan Safran Foer on Our Moral Obligation to Eat Better," 17 Sep. 2019 Take a spine-tingling spin on Luigi’s Honkin’ Haul-O-Ween and Mater’s Graveyard JamBOOree and check out all the frightful additions from Scary the Scare-car to the creepy, crawly Spider-car at Flo’s V8 Café. Advertorial, Orange County Register, "Tips From Disney Expert: 13 ‘Spooktacular’ Photo Moments During Halloween Time," 15 Sep. 2019 And then there are white writers, like Richard Ford, who actually talk about race all the time, in really problematic ways — but critics very rarely focus on that aspect on their work. Morgan Jerkins, Longreads, "‘To Be Polite By Ignoring the Obvious’: Jess Row on Unpacking Whiteness in Literature," 13 Sep. 2019 South Africa is back in the news yet again for all the wrong reasons. Abdi Latif Dahir, Quartz Africa, "These charts show migrants aren’t South Africa’s biggest problem," 13 Sep. 2019 As if that weren't enough, the rooftop restaurant has a build-your-own cider bar that'll give you all the fall feels. Elizabeth Gulino, House Beautiful, "You've Got to See How Eataly's Rooftop Restaurant Transformed Itself for Fall," 13 Sep. 2019 Academics from Georgetown University studied the 3,000 largest publicly traded US companies, identifying 140 female CEOs (about 4.6% of all the company chiefs). Cassie Werber, Quartz at Work, "New research shows the career path to CEO is different for women," 12 Sep. 2019 There’s a sturdiness for him, in the midst of all the energy of New York. David Canfield, EW.com, "Jeffrey Wright on finding the soul of Hobie (and New York) in The Goldfinch," 11 Sep. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb

The reason why Tuesday is Constitution Day is clear: Sept. 17 is the anniversary of the 1787 signing of that all-important document. Olivia B. Waxman, Time, "Citizenship Day Used to Be Called 'I Am an American Day.' Here's How It Came to Be—and Why It Changed," 17 Sep. 2019 Fashion insiders fly all across the world to craze over a city that is filled with different cultures which whip up a whirlwind of fashion. Nandi Howard, Essence, "This Is How Black Creatives Slay London Fashion Week," 16 Sep. 2019 Imagine filming someone and capturing their face, as well as your own, all at once. Geoffrey A. Fowler, The Denver Post, "First look at iPhone 11: That’s an awful lot of cash for a camera," 15 Sep. 2019 Think snap clips, bedazzled bobby pins, hair barrettes—sometimes worn all at once. Tara Gonzalez, Glamour, "Pearl Hair Clips Are Everywhere—And They’re Incredibly Easy to Style," 13 Sep. 2019 Bezos ultimately might not cave to his activist employees’ demands, but their open protest of the company’s record on climate change, all by itself, tells us Amazon’s culture has entered a whole new era. Lila Maclellan, Quartz at Work, "Even Jeff Bezos can’t afford to ignore his employees’ climate-change demands," 13 Sep. 2019 And given this is an all-stock offer, the majority of any benefit (roughly 56 percent) accrues to Barrick’s shareholders, not Newmont’s. Washington Post, "Barrick Swings Hard for Newmont - Maybe Too Hard," 18 Sep. 2019 The company hasn't yet decided whether to roll shows out on a weekly basis or all at once for binge watching. Chris Morris, Fortune, "NBC Reveals Name, Programming Details of Its New Streaming Service," 17 Sep. 2019 It was built with wood salvaged from the Perkins homestead, crafted by a Warren grassroots donor who owns an all-woman woodworking company, and modeled after the soapboxes that organizers would speak from during the early labor movement. Charlotte Alter, Time, "'One Woman, and Millions of People to Back Her Up.' How Elizabeth Warren Made Fighting Corruption A Feminist Rallying Cry," 17 Sep. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Federer-Nadal has been prompting wait-that’s-not-alls for 15 years -- and continues to do so. oregonlive, "Roger Federer-Rafael Nadal is the rivalry that resonates, no matter what the data says about Nadal-Novak Djokovic," 30 Aug. 2019 And though far from a cure-all, the potential for gene editing to make every acre of land more productive even in the face of climate change has captured the imagination of plant scientists, the agtech industry, and governments alike. Megan Molteni, WIRED, "Crispr Can Help Solve Our Looming Food Crisis—Here's How," 8 Aug. 2019 The Instagrammable carry-alls feature archival covers by long-time Vogue artists Benito and Eric dating to 80 and 90 years ago. Vogue, "Choose a Limited Edition Vogue Tote...Before They Sell Out," 8 Aug. 2019 Buying used isn’t a cure-all for fashion’s environmental problems. Marc Bain, Quartzy, "There’s never been a better time—or more need—to buy your clothes used," 16 Aug. 2019 Marine mammals are known to make alls sorts of sounds. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Listen to a Seal Sing the Star Wars Theme and ‘Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star’," 25 June 2019 But whatever happens, Tuesday’s spectacle in Singapore was, like so few other things, American and North Korean all at once. Washington Post, "For Trump and Kim, maybe the spectacle is what truly counted," 12 June 2018 As before, what may look like free-for-alls can actually be governed by a sort of forbearance. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, "Cruising in the Age of Consent," 19 June 2019 Reuters/Jason Lee For decades, the burgeoning power of China’s middle-class has been promised as a cure-all for many of the global economy’s troubles (not to mention its own). Gwynn Guilford, Quartz, "China’s debt disease might wreck its uncrashable housing market," 11 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'all.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of all

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1593, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for all

Adjective

Middle English al, all, alle, going back to Old English eall (West Saxon), all (Anglian), going back to Germanic *alla- (whence also Old Frisian al, alle "the whole of," Old Saxon all, Old High German al, all, Old Norse allr, Gothic alls), probably going back to *al-no- or *ol-no-, derivative of a base *ala-/*ola- seen in compounds (as Old English ælmihtig almighty entry 1, Old Saxon alohwīt "completely white," Old High German alawāri "quite true," Gothic alabrunsts "burnt offering," calque of Greek holokaútōma), of uncertain origin

Note: Both the correct repertoire of comparable forms and a valid Indo-European reconstruction have been subjects of dispute. Perhaps directly comparable to Germanic *ol-no- is Welsh oll, holl "the whole, all" (with h- of secondary origin); the same base might be present in Old Irish uile "all, every," if going back to *ol-i̯o-. (Old Irish oll "great, ample" is probably not related.) Outside of Germanic and Celtic other comparisons have been suggested, as Oscan allo "whole, entire" and Lithuanian aliái (in aliái víenas "all, everyone"). As an Indo-European reconstruction, Kroonen (Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic) proposes *h2el-nó- for Germanic and *h2ol-i̯o- for Old Irish uile, though the assumption of ablaut seems arbitrary. Whatever the ultimate origin, an etymon restricted to western (European) Indo-European.

Adverb

Middle English al, all, going back to Old English all, representing adverbial uses of the quantifier all entry 1

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

Middle English al, all, going back to Old English all, pronominal use of the quantifier all entry 1

Noun

nominal use of the pronoun all entry 3

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Statistics for all

Last Updated

8 Oct 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for all

The first known use of all was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for all

all

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: the whole, entire, total amount, quantity, or extent of
: every member or part of
: the whole number or sum of

all

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of all (Entry 2 of 3)

: entirely or completely
: for each side or player

all

pronoun

English Language Learners Definition of all (Entry 3 of 3)

: the entire number, quantity, or amount
: the only thing

all

adjective
\ ˈȯl How to pronounce all (audio) \

Kids Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : every one of All students can go.
2 : the whole of He sat up all night.
3 : the whole number of after all these years
4 : any whatever beyond all doubt
5 : the greatest possible Her story was told in all seriousness.

all

adverb

Kids Definition of all (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : completely He sat all alone. I'm all finished.
2 : so much He is all the better for being put in another class.
3 : very entry 2 sense 1 The child was all excited.
4 : for each side The score is two all.

all

pronoun

Kids Definition of all (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : the whole number or amount I ate all of the candy.
2 : everything All is lost.
3 : the only thing All I know is I'm done.

Medical Definition of ALL

acute lymphoblastic leukemia; acute lymphocytic leukemia

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More from Merriam-Webster on all

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with all

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for all

Spanish Central: Translation of all

Nglish: Translation of all for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of all for Arabic Speakers

Comments on all

What made you want to look up all? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

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to wander slowly or to speak indistinctly

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