whole

adjective
\ ˈhōl How to pronounce whole (audio) \

Definition of whole

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a(1) : free of wound or injury : unhurt
(2) : recovered from a wound or injury : restored
(3) : being healed whole of an ancient evil, I sleep sound— A. E. Housman
b : free of defect or impairment : intact
c : physically sound and healthy : free of disease or deformity
d : mentally or emotionally sound
2 : having all its proper parts or components : complete, unmodified whole milk a whole egg
3a : constituting the total sum or undiminished entirety : entire owns the whole island
b : each or all of the took part in the whole series of athletic events
4a : constituting an undivided unit : unbroken, uncut a whole roast suckling pig
b : directed to one end : concentrated your whole attention
5a : seemingly complete or total the whole idea is to help, not hinder
b : very great in quantity, extent, or scope feels a whole lot better now
6 : constituting the entirety of a person's nature or development educate the whole student
7 : having the same father and mother whole brother

whole

noun

Definition of whole (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : a complete amount or sum : a number, aggregate, or totality lacking no part, member, or element
2 : something constituting a complex unity : a coherent system or organization of parts fitting or working together as one
in whole
: to the full or entire extent : wholly usually used in the phrase in whole or in part
on the whole
1 : in view of all the circumstances or conditions : all things considered
2 : in general : in most instances : typically

whole

adverb

Definition of whole (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : wholly, entirely a whole new age group— Henry Chauncey
2 : as a complete entity

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Other Words from whole

Adjective

wholeness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for whole

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Adjective

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Choose the Right Synonym for whole

Adjective

perfect, whole, entire, intact mean not lacking or faulty in any particular. perfect implies the soundness and the excellence of every part, element, or quality of a thing frequently as an unattainable or theoretical state. a perfect set of teeth whole suggests a completeness or perfection that can be sought, gained, or regained. felt like a whole person again after vacation entire implies perfection deriving from integrity, soundness, or completeness of a thing. the entire Beethoven corpus intact implies retention of perfection of a thing in its natural or original state. the boat survived the storm intact

Examples of whole in a Sentence

Adjective The doctor assured me that the whole procedure would only take a few minutes. The whole place was remodeled. It looks great now. It's been a whole week since I've seen him. I spent the whole summer traveling through Europe. The whole evening was a great success. She read the whole book in one day. I've been waiting my whole life for this. We decided to forget the whole thing. We cooked a whole chicken. The community center offers a whole range of programs. Noun the landlord eventually refunded the whole of our deposit Adverb We cooked the chicken whole. The frog swallowed the fly whole.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The price may be steep, but talented center fielder Byron Buxton could fix a whole lot of problems. Bob Nightengale, USA TODAY, 10 June 2021 If nothing else, policy makers and the public have a whole lot more information on the reality of how the tax system works for those who can best afford to use it to their advantage. Rick Klein, Averi Harper, ABC News, 9 June 2021 Our season was tough in the sense that a whole lot of luck was involved due to Ghost Island. Dalton Ross, EW.com, 8 June 2021 Rainbow nails are officially a thing, making your choice a whole lot easier. Bella Cacciatore, Glamour, 8 June 2021 Whether, when and how to bring which associates back into the office – and the implications of having a hybrid workforce – raise a whole lot of questions. Eric Hutto, Forbes, 8 June 2021 After Matt James' Bachelor season ended on a pretty depressing note, Bachelor Nation fans are hoping that Katie Thurston's Bachelorette season can offer a whole lot of growth and improvement. Martha Sorren, refinery29.com, 7 June 2021 Just having this opportunity, especially in a year where there hasn't been a whole lot of good going on. Erick Taylor, Arkansas Online, 5 June 2021 The Leafs’ fortunes and failures are built around a lineup weighted too heavily on top-skilled forwards, a small number of whom eat up a whole lot of cap space. BostonGlobe.com, 5 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Tax proposals should be evaluated not by their effect on interest groups or income brackets but by their impact on economic growth as a whole. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, 31 May 2021 The Lakers may be flawed as a whole, but the Suns’ weaknesses due to an ailing Paul may end up being their downfall. Dj Siddiqi, Forbes, 30 May 2021 Outside the walls of these decidedly nontraditional shops, mechanic Sarah Tilton says the industry as a whole has a long way to go. NBC News, 30 May 2021 For the state as a whole, just over a quarter of people had at least a bachelor’s degree. Ramsey Archibald | Rarchibald@al.com, al, 30 May 2021 The wedding industry as a whole saw a 34% decline in revenue, according to an IBIS World report—the drop likely would have been bigger, but many couples who rescheduled their weddings had to pay to keep their venues and vendors for an extra year. Eliana Dockterman, Time, 29 May 2021 As impactful as Payne has been, Phoenix's bench, as a whole, has averaged just 26.7 points in the playoffs after averaging 37 in the regular season. Duane Rankin, The Arizona Republic, 29 May 2021 Along with delivering a rush of endorphins, cardio training can help reduce blood pressure and also improve cardiovascular function as a whole. Sarah Madaus, SELF, 29 May 2021 And their end goal is … the destruction of America as a whole. Tracy Smith, CBS News, 29 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb Halved or left whole, they can be roasted, braised, pickled, creamed, glazed, confited, or used to crown a stunning tarte tatin. Alex Delany, Bon Appétit, 17 May 2021 The bowl in the background is a head of romaine stored whole for five days that became a little soft, so the core was cut off and placed back in the bowl of water, which seemed to crisp it again nicely. Katlyn Moncada, Better Homes & Gardens, 4 May 2021 Herbs can be crushed or chopped and used in edible applications or added whole to salads and other dishes. Caroline Rogers, Southern Living, 29 Apr. 2021 Brown said this all validates his argument to distribute rental assistance funds swiftly and efficiently to make both renters and rental housing providers whole again. Brenda Richardson, Forbes, 18 May 2021 The entire film is afflicted with his myopia — his single-minded desire to make his family whole again, his fraught sense that the window of opportunity is steadily closing. K. Austin Collins, Rolling Stone, 14 May 2021 There, Pescador presents them whole and in fragments, remixing them with objects and drawings that are common to cartooning: large googly eyes, big toothy grins, composite cartoon characters fabricated out of cheap toys and bright fabrics. Los Angeles Times, 8 May 2021 For as sleek as the iPhone 12 already looks, an iPhone without a notch takes things to a whole another level. Yoni Heisler, BGR, 19 Apr. 2021 But Chicago 7 is perhaps his most whole-hearted exploration of the genre yet with its explosive take on the protracted and infamous trial of its title. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, 21 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'whole.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of whole

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adverb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for whole

Adjective

Middle English hool healthy, unhurt, entire, from Old English hāl; akin to Old High German heil healthy, unhurt, Old Norse heill, Old Church Slavonic cělŭ

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Time Traveler for whole

Time Traveler

The first known use of whole was before the 12th century

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Statistics for whole

Last Updated

12 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Whole.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whole. Accessed 12 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for whole

whole

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of whole

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: complete or full : not lacking or leaving out any part
: having all the parts : not divided or cut into parts or pieces
: great or large in size, extent, etc.

whole

noun

English Language Learners Definition of whole (Entry 2 of 3)

: something that is full or complete

whole

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of whole (Entry 3 of 3)

: entirely or completely
: in one piece that has not been cut into parts

whole

adjective
\ ˈhōl How to pronounce whole (audio) \

Kids Definition of whole

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : made up of all its parts : total, entire the whole family
2 : all the the whole week
3 : not cut up or ground a whole onion
4 : not scattered or divided I gave it my whole attention.
5 : having all its proper parts : complete whole milk
6 : completely healthy or sound in condition Your care made me whole again.

Other Words from whole

wholeness noun

whole

noun

Kids Definition of whole (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that is full or complete The whole of my day was spent working.
2 : a sum of all the parts and elements the whole of creation
on the whole
1 : all things considered
2 : in most cases

whole

adjective
\ ˈhōl How to pronounce whole (audio) \

Medical Definition of whole

: containing all its natural constituents, components, or elements : deprived of nothing by refining, processing, or separation whole milk

More from Merriam-Webster on whole

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for whole

Nglish: Translation of whole for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of whole for Arabic Speakers

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