feel

verb
\ ˈfēl \
felt\ ˈfelt \; feeling

Definition of feel

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to handle or touch in order to examine, test, or explore some quality She felt the fabric to see if it was wool.
b : to perceive by a physical sensation coming from discrete end organs (as of the skin or muscles) He felt a sudden pain in his leg.
2a : to undergo passive experience of continually felt the resentment of his competitors
b : to have one's sensibilities markedly affected by felt the insult deeply
3 : to ascertain by cautious trial usually used with out feeling out the sentiments of their neighbors on the subject of school improvements
4a : to be aware of by instinct or inference feel trouble brewing
b : believe, think say what you really feel
5 US slang : to understand (someone) : to know how (someone) feels Yeah, I feel you on that. I fall asleep every time I'm in the car as well.— Scott Sugarman When you buckle your chinstrap up, it's with a purpose, dog! Do you feel me?— Eric Berry

intransitive verb

1a : to receive or be able to receive a tactile sensation lost the ability to feel in his fingertips
b : to search for something by using the sense of touch She felt in her purse for her keys.
2a : to be conscious of an inward impression, state of mind, or physical condition I feel sick.
b : to have a marked sentiment or opinion feels strongly about it
3 : seem it feels like spring today
4 : to have sympathy or pity I feel for you
feel like
: to have an inclination for feel like a walk?

feel

noun

Definition of feel (Entry 2 of 2)

2 : the sense of touch
3a : the quality of a thing as imparted through or as if through touch
b : typical or peculiar quality or atmosphere also : an awareness of such a quality or atmosphere
4 : intuitive knowledge or ability

Keep scrolling for more

Synonyms for feel

Synonyms: Verb

perceive, scent, see, sense, smell, taste

Synonyms: Noun

feeling, sensation, sense

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of feel in a Sentence

Verb

He felt a sudden pain in his leg. I could feel the warmth of the sun. I felt someone tap my shoulder. Do you feel a draft? She felt the fabric to see if it was wool. Your ribs are bruised, but I don't feel any broken bones.

Noun

the feel of old leather Although the table is brand-new, it has the look and feel of an antique. He liked the feel of the sun on his face.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The fresh-faced group will include a record number of women elected in the 2018 midterm elections, and their descent on the capital has revived the excitement felt on election night. Abby Gardner, Glamour, "Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the Next Generation of Congresswomen Takes Office," 3 Jan. 2019 Auto makers also have been feeling the pinch from the cooling economy. Wsj Graphics, WSJ, "Apple Warning: Seven Charts That Show the Pressure on China’s Consumers," 2 Jan. 2019 Although these shuttles might feel more theme-park ride than transit solution, these slow-motion minibuses are performing an important task by introducing people to the idea of driverless tech. Alissa Walker, Curbed, "The good, the bad, and the ugly of self-driving cars in 2018," 27 Dec. 2018 Supermodel and America's Got Talent judge Heidi Klum spills all her tips for looking and feeling her best. Maddie Aberman, Redbook, "Heidi Klum Shares Her Trick for Glowing From Within," 14 Dec. 2018 And now Michael Cohen poses probably one of the biggest threats to his presidency, and feels a sense of personal betrayal and vengeance. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Axios’ Jonathan Swan explains what the press gets wrong about the Trump administration," 6 Dec. 2018 Neurologists on the front lines have felt powerless, watching their patients disappear into the sinkhole of forgetfulness. Linda Marsa, Discover Magazine, "A New Treatment for Alzheimer's? It Starts With Lifestyle," 16 Nov. 2018 Normal omnidirectional treadmills don’t feel quite natural, and some include straps so users won’t lose their balance. Adi Robertson, The Verge, "Google is patenting a pair of motorized VR roller skates," 20 Nov. 2018 What may not be normal though, is constantly feeling like your stomach is swollen. Colleen Stinchcombe, Woman's Day, "Why Am I Always Bloated?," 29 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The striking slanted roof also gives the space a more spacious feel. Jenny Xie, Curbed, "The 7 most impressive prefab homes from 2018," 27 Dec. 2018 The imperfect edging gives each piece a unique feel. Jennifer Fernandez, House Beautiful, "A Joanna Gaines Bedding Line Is Coming To Target The Day After Christmas," 22 Dec. 2018 Vibes also gave the song a cooler, more atmospheric feel. Marc Myers, WSJ, "Todd Rundgren Recalls the Breakup Behind ‘Hello It’s Me’," 22 Nov. 2018 The two-inch plush material is ideal for firm mattresses, adding a fluffy pillow-top feel to your bed, and the stitching prevents shifting and helps keep the fill well-distributed. Lexie Sachs, Good Housekeeping, "7 Top-Rated Mattress Toppers, According to Textile Pros," 19 Dec. 2018 Each missive is accompanied by an illustration by a different artist, giving the collection an eclectic feel. Meghan Cox Gurdon, WSJ, "Children’s Books: Inspiring Words for Aspiring Readers," 13 Dec. 2018 Kids will love the soft feel and colorful design while parents will appreciate the organic cotton fabric. Jessica Leigh Mattern, Country Living, "Copy Joanna Gaines and Get Baby Crew's Christmas Pajamas for Your Whole Family," 1 Dec. 2018 But the artsy scene and laid back feel haven’t changed much, thanks to strict city ordinances and the century-old Laguna Beach Art Association, which have kept commercialism in check. Andrea Bennett, Condé Nast Traveler, "First Look: Hotel Joaquin in Laguna Beach, California," 30 Nov. 2018 The container’s metal siding remains as the ceiling, giving the spaces an industrial feel. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Striking apartment building is made up of 140 shipping containers," 12 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'feel.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of feel

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for feel

Verb and Noun

Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan; akin to Old High German fuolen to feel, Latin palpare to caress

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about feel

Statistics for feel

Last Updated

9 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for feel

The first known use of feel was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for feel

feel

verb

English Language Learners Definition of feel

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to be aware of (something that affects you physically, such as pain, heat, or an object touching your body)

: to touch (something) with your fingers to see what it is like

: to find (something) by touching with your fingers

feel

noun

English Language Learners Definition of feel (Entry 2 of 2)

: the quality of a thing that is experienced by touching it

: a particular quality

: an understanding of something

feel

verb
\ ˈfēl \
felt\ ˈfelt \; feeling

Kids Definition of feel

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to be aware of through physical contact feel cold
2 : to examine or search for by touching The doctor felt for broken bones.
3 : to be conscious of He felt a fear of the dark.
4 : to seem especially to the touch This cloth feels like silk.
5 : to sense a physical, mental, or emotional state felt sick felt confused and angry
6 : to have sympathy I feel for you.
7 : believe sense 4, think Say what you feel.
feel like
: to have an urge or desire to Do you feel like taking a walk?

feel

noun

Kids Definition of feel (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : sensation sense 2, feeling He likes the feel of the sun on his skin.
2 : the quality of something as learned through or as if through touch The sweater had a scratchy feel to it.

feel

verb
\ ˈfē(ə)l \
felt\ ˈfelt \; feeling

Medical Definition of feel

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to handle or touch in order to examine, test, or explore some quality felt the compress to see if it was wet
2 : to perceive by a physical sensation coming from discrete end organs (as of the skin or muscles)

intransitive verb

1 : to receive or be able to receive a tactile sensation
2 : to search for something by using the sense of touch

feel

noun

Medical Definition of feel (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the sense of touch

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on feel

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with feel

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for feel

Spanish Central: Translation of feel

Nglish: Translation of feel for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of feel for Arabic Speakers

Comments on feel

What made you want to look up feel? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

means, resources, or money

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Homophone Quiz

  • three-bears-two-of-them-look-like-theyre-whispering-to-a-third-bear-who-looks-chuffed-to-be-the-center-of-attention
  • In order to judge how people felt, the senator's office hired a firm to take a ______.
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!