all

adjective
\ ˈȯl How to pronounce all (audio) \

Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : the whole amount, quantity, or extent of needed all the courage they had sat up all night
b : as much as possible spoke in all seriousness
2 : every member or individual component of all men will go all five children were present
3 : the whole number or sum of all the angles of a triangle are equal to two right angles
4 : every all manner of hardship
5 : any whatever beyond all doubt
6 : nothing but : only all work and no play :
a : completely taken up with, given to, or absorbed by became all attention
b : having or seeming to have (some physical feature) in conspicuous excess or prominence all legs
c : paying full attention with all ears
7 dialect : used up : entirely consumed used especially of food and drink
8 : being more than one person or thing I don't know who all is coming.
all the
: as much of … as : as much of a … as all the home I ever had

all

adverb

Definition of all (Entry 2 of 4)

1a : wholly, quite sat all alone often used as an intensive all out of proportionall over the yardit wasn't all that funny
b : selected as the best (as at a sport) within an area or organization used in combination all-league halfback
2 obsolete : only, exclusively
3 archaic : just
4 : so much all the better for it
5 : for each side : apiece the score is two all

Definition of all (Entry 3 of 4)

1a : the whole number, quantity, or amount : totality all that I have all of us all of the books
b used in such phrases as for all I know, for all I care, and for all the good it does to indicate a lack of knowledge, interest, or effectiveness
2 : everybody, everything gave equal attention to all that is all
all in all
: on the whole : generally all in all, things might have been worse
and all
: and everything else especially of a kind suggested by a previous context cards to fill out with … numbers and all— Sally Quinn

all

noun

Definition of all (Entry 4 of 4)

: the whole of one's possessions, resources, or energy gave his all for the cause

Synonyms & Antonyms for all

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Adverb

Synonyms: Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Adverb

Antonyms: Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

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Choose the Right Synonym for all

Adjective

whole, entire, total, all mean including everything or everyone without exception. whole implies that nothing has been omitted, ignored, abated, or taken away. read the whole book entire may suggest a state of completeness or perfection to which nothing can be added. the entire population was wiped out total implies that everything has been counted, weighed, measured, or considered. the total number of people present all may equal whole, entire, or total. all proceeds go to charity

Examples of all in a Sentence

Adjective I've been waiting all week to see her. He had to walk all the way home. She works all year round. He'll need all the help he can get. Someone took all the candy. Adverb She has traveled all around the world. This money will be all yours when I die. She had buttons all down the side of her dress. I forgot all about paying the bill. The kids got all excited when they saw Santa Claus. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The footage of Vladimir Konstantinov, both of his all-world playing days and compromised present day, is alone worth the view. Matt Porter, BostonGlobe.com, 9 July 2022 This week, Ohtani will be the main attraction of Major League Baseball’s All-Star festivities, which will mark the unofficial halfway point of what could wind up being the greatest individual season of the last century, if not of all-time. Los Angeles Times, 12 July 2021 His all-or-nothing shot turned out to be a giant dud, flying over the green and across a road. Paul Daugherty, The Enquirer, 27 June 2022 His all-hands call did little to clear up those issues or quell staff fears about content moderation policies, the direction of the company, and if they will be forced to work from Twitter offices. Scott Nover, Quartz, 16 June 2022 It’s utilitarian, all-business, the opposite of exciting to shop for or talk about over brunch. Glamour, 30 May 2022 In general, all-metal and metal and plastic combo garden hose nozzles are superior to those made entirely out of plastic. Rachel Klein, Popular Mechanics, 19 Apr. 2022 High school students in Long Beach began advocating for multi-stall, all-gender restrooms in 2018. Laura Newberry, Los Angeles Times, 7 Mar. 2022 Think of it as your all-access pass to Singapore, and don't leave your hotel room without it. Maya Kachroo-levine, Travel + Leisure, 2 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb After all, loot boxes are not the only industry practice that needs to be examined. Wired, 29 July 2022 After all, the team is just 42-56, and news of former MVP Mike Trout's scary spinal condition could convince owner Arte Moreno to rebuild. David Faris, The Week, 29 July 2022 Ford is unveiling its first version of an all-electric pickup truck police cruiser. BostonGlobe.com, 28 July 2022 Bentley is pushing back the dawn of its all-electric age. Bryan Hood, Robb Report, 28 July 2022 Rivian's vehicles also have received positive reviews from the automotive community, with its all-electric R1T named Truck of the Year by MotorTrend in 2022. Khristopher J. Brooks, CBS News, 28 July 2022 After all, life is short, so why not stop to appreciate, yes? Ed Silverman, STAT, 28 July 2022 Ford, which this spring began selling an all-electric version of its popular F-150 pickup, reported a 32% increase in U.S. sales in June. Nora Eckert, WSJ, 27 July 2022 Ultium Cells is also building a plant in Spring Hill, Tennessee, that is expected to start running next year and provide battery cells to Spring Hill Assembly where GM just started building the Cadillac Lyriq all-electric SUV. Jamie L. Lareau, Detroit Free Press, 25 July 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Bloys is used to having to compete with Netflix’s big spending on a myriad of content as the streaming giant attempts to be a catch-all for viewers. Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter, 12 July 2022 Even now, leaders in Washington are pushing ambitious new spending plans as the cure-all for what ails our country, while too many mayors and governors refuse to address the root causes for why people are fleeing their cities and states. Andrew Tisch, Forbes, 7 June 2022 Table of Contents Side Table From books and reading glasses, to mugs and tsotchkes, let this minimalist reading table serve as a catch-all for your reading creatures — because the best reading nooks feel lovingly lived in. Anna Tingley, Variety, 27 Apr. 2022 Many Grammy moments were collaborations of artists who don’t normally perform together, but the phrase gradually came to serve as a catch-all for show highlights. Paul Grein, Billboard, 30 Mar. 2022 Taken together, the numbers suggest there is no quick cure-all for the political discord in Washington. Dante Chinni, NBC News, 13 June 2022 Roe never seemed like a cure-all to the women of Jane. Emma Hinchliffe And Paige Mcglauflin, Fortune, 10 June 2022 Any Covid bill Congress moves will quickly become a catch-all for far more than small business. The Editorial Board, WSJ, 31 Jan. 2022 The Bruce Almighty-esque comedy series drops at a time when the streaming business, once a Wild West-like free-for-all for creatives, is coming under heightened scrutiny and tightening budgets. Seija Rankin, The Hollywood Reporter, 2 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'all.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of all

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1593, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for all

Adjective

Middle English al, all, alle, going back to Old English eall (West Saxon), all (Anglian), going back to Germanic *alla- (whence also Old Frisian al, alle "the whole of," Old Saxon all, Old High German al, all, Old Norse allr, Gothic alls), probably going back to *al-no- or *ol-no-, derivative of a base *ala-/*ola- seen in compounds (as Old English ælmihtig almighty entry 1, Old Saxon alohwīt "completely white," Old High German alawāri "quite true," Gothic alabrunsts "burnt offering," calque of Greek holokaútōma), of uncertain origin

Note: Both the correct repertoire of comparable forms and a valid Indo-European reconstruction have been subjects of dispute. Perhaps directly comparable to Germanic *ol-no- is Welsh oll, holl "the whole, all" (with h- of secondary origin); the same base might be present in Old Irish uile "all, every," if going back to *ol-i̯o-. (Old Irish oll "great, ample" is probably not related.) Outside of Germanic and Celtic other comparisons have been suggested, as Oscan allo "whole, entire" and Lithuanian aliái (in aliái víenas "all, everyone"). As an Indo-European reconstruction, Kroonen (Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic) proposes *h2el-nó- for Germanic and *h2ol-i̯o- for Old Irish uile, though the assumption of ablaut seems arbitrary. Whatever the ultimate origin, an etymon restricted to western (European) Indo-European.

Adverb

Middle English al, all, going back to Old English all, representing adverbial uses of the quantifier all entry 1

Pronoun, singular or plural in construction

Middle English al, all, going back to Old English all, pronominal use of the quantifier all entry 1

Noun

nominal use of the pronoun all entry 3

Learn More About all

Time Traveler for all

Time Traveler

The first known use of all was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near all

alkynyl

all

all' ottava

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Statistics for all

Last Updated

20 Jul 2022

Cite this Entry

“All.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/all. Accessed 10 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for all

all

adjective
\ ˈȯl How to pronounce all (audio) \

Kids Definition of all

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : every one of All students can go.
2 : the whole of He sat up all night.
3 : the whole number of after all these years
4 : any whatever beyond all doubt
5 : the greatest possible Her story was told in all seriousness.

all

adverb

Kids Definition of all (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : completely He sat all alone. I'm all finished.
2 : so much He is all the better for being put in another class.
3 : very entry 2 sense 1 The child was all excited.
4 : for each side The score is two all.

all

pronoun

Kids Definition of all (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : the whole number or amount I ate all of the candy.
2 : everything All is lost.
3 : the only thing All I know is I'm done.

ALL

abbreviation

Medical Definition of ALL

acute lymphoblastic leukemia; acute lymphocytic leukemia

More from Merriam-Webster on all

Nglish: Translation of all for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of all for Arabic Speakers

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