mind

noun
\ ˈmīnd How to pronounce mind (audio) \

Definition of mind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : recollection, memory keep that in mind time out of mind
2a : the element or complex (see complex entry 1 sense 1) of elements in an individual that feels, perceives, thinks, wills, and especially reasons Keep your mind active as you grow older.
b : the conscious mental events and capabilities in an organism
c : the organized conscious and unconscious adaptive mental activity of an organism
3 : intention, desire I changed my mind
4 : the normal or healthy condition of the mental faculties Who in their right mind would try such a stunt?
5 : opinion, view was urged to speak his mind
6 : disposition, mood He's in a bad state of mind.
7a : a person or group embodying mental qualities the public mind
b : intellectual ability the works of men of mind— Alfred Tennyson
8 capitalized, Christian Science : god sense 1b
9 : a conscious substratum or factor in the universe
10 : attention pay him no mind

mind

verb
minded; minding; minds

Definition of mind (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 chiefly dialectal : remind
2 chiefly dialectal : remember
3 : to attend to closely
4a(1) : to become aware of : notice
(2) : to regard with attention : consider important often used in the imperative with following you for emphasis I'm not against inspiration, mind you; I simply refuse to sit and stare at a blank page waiting for it— Dennis Whitcomb
b chiefly dialectal : intend, purpose
5a : to give heed to attentively in order to obey
b : to follow the orders or instructions of
6a : to be concerned about
b : dislike I don't mind going
7a : to be careful : see mind you finish it
b : to be cautious about mind the broken rung
8 : to give protective care to : tend

intransitive verb

1 : to be attentive or wary
2 : to become concerned : care
3 : to pay obedient heed or attention

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Other Words from mind

Verb

minder noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for mind

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of mind in a Sentence

Noun He read great literature to develop his mind. It's important to keep your mind active as you grow older. He went for a walk to help clear his mind. the mysteries of the human mind My mind is always open to new ideas. You can't argue with him. His mind is closed. I can't concentrate: my mind is always wandering and I can't keep it focused on anything. The smell of pine sends my mind back to childhood. The sound of her voice jerked my mind back to the present. My mind tells me it can't work, but my heart tells me I want to try it. Verb It was raining, but I didn't mind. I don't mind very much what happens. “Why is he so angry?” “Oh, don't mind him. He's always complaining about something.”
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Back in February, Najafi partnered with former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick in looking to raise up to $287 million through a special-purpose acquisition company with a social purpose in mind. Duane Rankin, The Arizona Republic, "Phoenix Suns vice chairman Jahm Najafi pledges $10 million to NBA Foundation," 31 Mar. 2021 The pandemic also affected ticket sales, with the team trying to strike a balance between season-ticket vs. single-day ticket sales with limited capacity in mind. Marc Bona, cleveland, "Cleveland Indians announce Progressive Field changes as fans head back to the ballpark for 2021," 31 Mar. 2021 What looks like a stuffed animal at first glance is actually an ultra-plush pillow designed with naptime in mind. Rebecca Norris, USA TODAY, "20 magical things under $50 you can buy at shopDisney," 31 Mar. 2021 Keep in mind, the IRS rejects most applications for offers in compromise. Nerd Wallet, oregonlive, "5 options for people who can’t afford their tax bills," 31 Mar. 2021 Keep your wallet in mind Save some money and enjoy the value of the Zhumell 12×70 Astronomy Binoculars. Chris Hachey, BGR, "Best Astronomy Binoculars," 31 Mar. 2021 The bill agreed upon last week and which the legislature passed Tuesday skews more toward what lawmakers have had in mind: more transparency, less gubernatorial control, and more earmarking of revenue for social equity programs. Ryan Bort, Rolling Stone, "New York Is Legalizing Weed — Now What?," 31 Mar. 2021 Regardless of the sneaker's design, every style has been carefully selected with comfort in mind, giving your feet a break wherever your travels make take you. Daria Smith, Southern Living, "These Amazon Slip-On Sneakers Are Bound To Be the Most Comfortable Shoes You Own," 31 Mar. 2021 And keep in mind that obtaining stable temperatures with wearable thermometers can be a challenge. Connie Chang, Washington Post, "Covid sparked interest in wearable thermometers, but you may be better off sticking to the basics," 30 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb An 11-year-old (in a pandemic, mind you) is a complicated human, filled with hormones and intensities. Washington Post, "If a tween hates therapy, how much can it really help?," 31 Mar. 2021 And now that production has been completed, the film’s crew might have unwittingly confirmed the leak — mind you, some major spoilers will follow below. Chris Smith, BGR, "Brand new ‘Spider-Man 3’ leak may confirm the craziest spoiler yet," 26 Mar. 2021 Givan said the bills bring to mind the tactics used to suppress the Black vote before the civil rights movement. Mike Cason | Mcason@al.com, al, "Lawmakers pass bill to make it illegal to vote in Alabama, another state in same election," 16 Mar. 2021 Knipe’s singing shifts from conversational to soaring, pensive to heroic, with a leap of anticipation in their voice that can bring to mind Michael Stipe or Buddy Holly. Jon Dolan, Rolling Stone, "Adult Mom’s ‘Driver’ Is a Coming-of-Age Indie-Pop Masterpiece," 5 Mar. 2021 The word no longer needs to bring to mind a flavorless bowl of cold tomatoes and watery lettuce. Bee Wilson, WSJ, "The Great American Salad Revolution," 1 Jan. 2021 Those ever-faithful Trumpsters bring to mind the German citizens who stuck with Hitler. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Readers React: Your Say: Trump 2024?," 4 Dec. 2020 These words also bring to mind the people who give so generously of their time, food and money to see that no one in our county ever needs to go hungry. Hermine Saunders, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Saunders: A special Thanksgiving message — just bringing some sunshine," 14 Nov. 2020 For many museumgoers, Marshall's photos will bring to mind the work of other great Detroit street photographers like Bill Rauhauser, David Griffith and Michelle Andonian. Ryan Patrick Hooper, Detroit Free Press, "Glossy vs. gritty: 2 new DIA exhibits celebrate auto design, blue-collar life in Michigan," 14 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mind

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for mind

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English gemynd; akin to Old High German gimunt memory, Latin ment-, mens mind, monēre to remind, warn, Greek menos spirit, mnasthai, mimnēskesthai to remember

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Time Traveler for mind

Time Traveler

The first known use of mind was before the 12th century

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Statistics for mind

Last Updated

3 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Mind.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mind. Accessed 10 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for mind

mind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of mind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the part of a person that thinks, reasons, feels, and remembers
used to describe the way a person thinks or the intelligence of a person
: a very intelligent person

mind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mind (Entry 2 of 2)

: to be bothered by (something) : to object to or dislike (something)
: to care about or worry about (something or someone)
used to make a polite request

mind

noun
\ ˈmīnd How to pronounce mind (audio) \

Kids Definition of mind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the part of a person that thinks, reasons, feels, understands, and remembers
2 : memory sense 1 Keep my advice in mind.
3 : intention sense 1 I changed my mind.
4 : a person's view or opinion about something Speak your mind.

mind

verb
minded; minding

Kids Definition of mind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to pay attention to Mind what you're doing.
2 : obey sense 1 Be sure to mind the teacher.
3 : to be bothered by “Don't mind the boys,” Abigail whispered. “They tease.”— Alice Dalgliesh, The Courage of Sarah Noble
4 : to object to : dislike I don't mind the cold.
5 : to take charge of Please mind the children.
6 : to be careful about You should mind what you say.

mind

noun
\ ˈmīnd How to pronounce mind (audio) \

Medical Definition of mind

1 : the element or complex of elements in an individual that feels, perceives, thinks, wills, and especially reasons
2 : the conscious mental events and capabilities in an organism
3 : the organized conscious and unconscious adaptive mental activity of an organism

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More from Merriam-Webster on mind

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mind

Nglish: Translation of mind for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mind for Arabic Speakers

Comments on mind

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