heed

verb
\ ˈhēd \
heeded; heeding; heeds

Definition of heed 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to pay attention

transitive verb

: to give consideration or attention to : mind heed what he says heed the call

heed

noun
\ ˈhēd \

Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

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Examples of heed in a Sentence

Verb

It may be possible to desensitize a cat to being petted for extended periods.  … A safer solution is to consistently limit petting time, and to heed the cat's cues that she's had enough. Cat Watch, August 2008 In-line skating is not for everyone, and even those for whom it is ideally suited can skate into trouble, especially if they fail to heed safety precautions. —Jane E. Brody, New York Times, 2 May 1991 However, he should heed an axiom from the pretelevision age: physician, heal thyself. —George F. Will, Newsweek, 17 Mar. 1986 She failed to heed the warnings. if we had heeded the ranger's advice, we might not have gotten lost

Noun

Neither the British ministry nor the British Parliament welcomed American voices in determining policy in 1763, or ever. The British government paid little heed to the public press on either side of the water. —Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books, 16 Nov. 2006 She retrained as a doctor and it was through her pioneering research with cancer patients in the early 1960s (she showed how narcotics could be used without adverse effect) that the medical profession began to take heed. —Kate Kellaway, Prospect, January 2003 Imagine swimming along with playful seals and then diving down to see such rarities as batfish.  … Fleets of hammerhead sharks pay divers no heed, nor do the penguins move out of the way. Town & Country, January 1983 took heed of the student's learning disability so as to arrive at reasonable expectations for him pay heed to what you're doing with that knife while you're talking
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Our ‘Zero Tolerance’ approach to enforcement sends a clear message to those who still don’t heed the warning to designate a sober driver before celebrations begin. Stephanie Petit, PEOPLE.com, "Vince Vaughn Arrested for DUI, Resisting Arrest in California," 10 June 2018 The boards are nailed in place to keep the strangers out — in case gawkers don’t heed the No Trespass signs affixed to the front of the home and to the trunks of greening trees surrounding it. Chris Graves, Cincinnati.com, "Pike County: Death in the foothills," 15 May 2018 To a question from the judge, Martins suggested that defense lawyers who don’t heed his prosecutor’s notice might be charged with violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act, conviction of with carries a maximum 10-year prison sentence. Carol Rosenberg, miamiherald, "9/11 attorneys say they can’t defend clients without questioning CIA about torture," 19 Jan. 2018 Unsurprisingly, Mixers are already flooding the comments section with requests to take the brand international, so here's hoping the group heeds the call with a global release date soon. Zoë Weiner, Teen Vogue, "Little Mix Is Launching a Makeup Brand Called LMX," 6 July 2018 If that’s not heeded within 20 to 30 seconds, the scooter will slowly shut down and have to be removed from the area before it can be ridden again. Richard A. Marini, San Antonio Express-News, "Downtown gets the Bird with fun-to-ride scooters," 5 July 2018 Shah said the small business owners are tallying up their losses and may go on strike Wednesday until the government heeds their concerns. Vidhi Doshi, Washington Post, "Mumbai’s plastic ban carries costly fines and jail sentences for offenders," 26 June 2018 But buried deep in the Deadpool actor's funny Twitter timeline is the ultimate guide to fatherhood all men no man should heed. refinery29.com, "Ryan Reynolds Tweets Dad Advice Literally No One Should Heed," 15 June 2018 However, Border Patrol's statistics show that families, most of them from Central America, may not necessarily be heeding this warning. Rafael Carranza, azcentral, "Yuma area sees record spike in minors crossing border illegally, drop in families," 13 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But the hurry to embrace industry means little heed was paid to the economics and now firms fall by the wayside. Time, "The Trouble with Sharing: China's Bike Fever Has Reached Saturation Point," 2 Apr. 2018 Much of official Washington had paid little heed when the provision with the law was passed, expecting the list to be shelved and forgotten as soon as it was released, as such reports often are. Gardiner Harris, New York Times, "Coming U.S. List of Oligarchs Linked to Putin Alarms Russia’s Rich," 26 Jan. 2018 And Houstonians in oil and gas and those who care about our long-term economic prosperity must take heed: The big paydays most certainly won’t last forever. Houston Chronicle, "Competition for top talent keeps pay scale high in oil industry," 13 July 2018 Developers seem to be paying little heed to the lessons of the last building boom. Dominique Fong, WSJ, "China’s Ghost Towns Haunt Its Economy," 15 June 2018 As for the identity of the killer, Pearce pays little heed to the progress of the murder mystery. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "Charlize Theron Explores Motherhood’s Discontents in “Tully”," 4 May 2018 And China may pay no heed to American sanctions on Iran, which would further stoke tension between the two. The Economist, "The American president is stirring up trouble in a volatile oil market," 4 July 2018 But as competitors took heed and raised the sophistication of their sedans, the ES took its share of knocks from drivers who wanted more dynamic handling. Jeff Yip, Houston Chronicle, "Posher, sleeker 2019 Lexus ES will have Apple CarPlay, Amazon Alexa," 16 June 2018 So far the government has paid little heed to such gloomy talk. The Economist, "China’s tighter regulation of shadow banks begins to bite," 14 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heed

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for heed

Verb

Middle English, from Old English hēdan; akin to Old High German huota guard, Old English hōd hood

Noun

see heed entry 1

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Learn More about heed

Phrases Related to heed

pay heed to

take heed of

Statistics for heed

Last Updated

1 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for heed

The first known use of heed was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for heed

heed

verb

English Language Learners Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to (advice, a warning, etc.)

heed

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention or notice

heed

verb
\ ˈhēd \
heeded; heeding

Kids Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to : mind Heed my warning.

heed

noun

Kids Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention sense 1 The wild dogs had been to the house … and he had paid no heed to them. —Scott O'Dell, Island of the Blue Dolphins

Other words from heed

heedful adjective

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Comments on heed

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