heed

verb
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \
heeded; heeding; heeds

Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to pay attention

transitive verb

: to give consideration or attention to : mind heed what he says heed the call

heed

noun
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \

Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

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Examples of heed in a Sentence

Verb It may be possible to desensitize a cat to being petted for extended periods.  … A safer solution is to consistently limit petting time, and to heed the cat's cues that she's had enough. Cat Watch, August 2008 In-line skating is not for everyone, and even those for whom it is ideally suited can skate into trouble, especially if they fail to heed safety precautions. — Jane E. Brody, New York Times, 2 May 1991 However, he should heed an axiom from the pretelevision age: physician, heal thyself. — George F. Will, Newsweek, 17 Mar. 1986 She failed to heed the warnings. if we had heeded the ranger's advice, we might not have gotten lost Noun Neither the British ministry nor the British Parliament welcomed American voices in determining policy in 1763, or ever. The British government paid little heed to the public press on either side of the water. — Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books, 16 Nov. 2006 She retrained as a doctor and it was through her pioneering research with cancer patients in the early 1960s (she showed how narcotics could be used without adverse effect) that the medical profession began to take heed. — Kate Kellaway, Prospect, January 2003 Imagine swimming along with playful seals and then diving down to see such rarities as batfish.  … Fleets of hammerhead sharks pay divers no heed, nor do the penguins move out of the way. Town & Country, January 1983 took heed of the student's learning disability so as to arrive at reasonable expectations for him pay heed to what you're doing with that knife while you're talking
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb International medical schools are well-suited to heed that call. G. Richard Olds, Fortune, "How to diversify America’s doctor workforce," 7 Feb. 2021 But Wheeler wouldn’t heed some police calls to put the Gun Violence Reduction Team back on the street, those familiar with the meeting said at the time. oregonlive, "Portland mayor proposed bringing back controversial Gun Violence Reduction Team: ‘Sell it to the new council ASAP’," 13 Jan. 2021 Others were more anonymous, people who had journeyed from Indiana and South Carolina to heed President Donald Trump's call to show their support. Sabrina Tavernise, Star Tribune, "Capitol rioters were mostly white men," 8 Jan. 2021 Others were more anonymous, people who had journeyed from Indiana and South Carolina to heed President Trump’s call to show their support. New York Times, "These Are the Rioters Who Stormed the Nation’s Capitol," 7 Jan. 2021 When a sharecropper in Golddust, Tenn., started searching for tenants to chop cotton near the banks of the Mississippi River, Bell's family was ready to heed the call. Sarah Macaraeg, USA TODAY, "On 88 acres of self-governed land in Tennessee, a dream deferred for Choctaw people comes true," 26 Nov. 2020 Because these are the simplest of recipes, please heed the admonition to use only the very best ingredients. Bill St. John, The Denver Post, "Get Cooking: 10 ways to make avocado toast," 13 June 2020 The world should heed the real message of this Olympic bid. Paul Newberry, ajc, "Column: Arctic city throws hat in ring for Summer Olympics," 5 Feb. 2021 The world should instead heed Uyghur victims of China’s coercive indoctrination. The Economist, "The persecution of the Uyghurs is a crime against humanity," 17 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But take heed: that sponge you’re using for those various tasks could be trying to kill you. Paul Stephen, San Antonio Express-News, "The dirtiest thing in your kitchen is your sponge, with as much bacteria as your intestines," 13 Feb. 2021 Fred Again, the song begs for compassion from a lover and system that refuses to take heed. Chelsey Sanchez, Harper's BAZAAR, "FKA Twigs’s “Don’t Judge Me” Music Video Displays Art Honoring the African Diaspora," 27 Jan. 2021 Biden officials want to build further confidence in the vaccines, which were developed at record pace under a president who otherwise paid little heed to science. Josh Wingrove, Anchorage Daily News, "Biden team retiring ‘Warp Speed’ name from vaccination push," 15 Jan. 2021 The marginalized folks on my Twitter timeline spoke of begging and pleading with tech and tech media to truly, finally take heed of the history of white supremacy and abuse. Sydette Harry, Wired, "Listening to Black Women: The Innovation Tech Can't Figure Out," 11 Jan. 2021 Now the prescient Gottlieb is sounding the alarm again, and Americans ought to take heed. Star Tribune, "A new viral threat, but still time to act," 18 Jan. 2021 For the most part, L.A. County residents have taken heed of the public health orders intended to slow the spread of the coronavirus in the community. Stephanie Lai, Los Angeles Times, "Dozens protest outside of home of L.A. County’s public health director," 29 Nov. 2020 As the world faces this crisis, Guterres urged countries to pay more heed to the knowledge held by indigenous communities, who are stewards of 80% of the world's biodiversity on land. Laura Smith-spark, CNN, "Humanity is waging a 'suicidal' war on nature, UN chief warns," 2 Dec. 2020 With the watchdog having just criticized Labour for a politicized complaints process, analysts said the party would have to take heed of due process and could very well end up reinstating him after its investigation. Benjamin Mueller, New York Times, "Labour Party Suspends Jeremy Corbyn Over Anti-Semitism Response," 29 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heed.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heed

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for heed

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English hēdan; akin to Old High German huota guard, Old English hōd hood

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Time Traveler for heed

Time Traveler

The first known use of heed was before the 12th century

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Statistics for heed

Last Updated

23 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Heed.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heed. Accessed 25 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for heed

heed

verb

English Language Learners Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to (advice, a warning, etc.)

heed

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention or notice

heed

verb
\ ˈhēd How to pronounce heed (audio) \
heeded; heeding

Kids Definition of heed

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pay attention to : mind Heed my warning.

heed

noun

Kids Definition of heed (Entry 2 of 2)

: attention sense 1 The wild dogs had been to the house … and he had paid no heed to them.— Scott O'Dell, Island of the Blue Dolphins

Other Words from heed

heedful adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on heed

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for heed

Nglish: Translation of heed for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of heed for Arabic Speakers

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