bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Definition of bind 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make secure by tying His hands were bound with rope.

b : to confine, restrain, or restrict as if with bonds … she was not wholly bound in mind by her middle-class existence —Delmore Schwartz

c : to put under an obligation binds himself with an oath

d : to constrain with legal authority The court's decision binds them to pay the fine.

2a : to wrap around with something so as to enclose or cover A silk sash bound her waist.

b : bandage bind their wounds

3 : to fasten round about when wreaths of laurel bound them

4 : to tie together binding the wheat into sheaves

5a : to cause to stick together tuna and celery bound by mayonnaise

b : to take up and hold (as by chemical forces) : combine with cellulose binds water

6 : constipate Cheese tends to bind him.

7 : to make a firm commitment for a handshake binds the deal

8 : to protect, strengthen, or decorate by a band or binding a carpet bound with a gold edging

9 : to apply the parts of the cover to (a book)

10 : to set at work as an apprentice : indenture He was bound out to a tailor for one year.

11 : to cause to have an emotional attachment the emotional ties that bind us

12 : to fasten together a pin bound the ends of the scarf

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass A little milk will help the ingredients bind.

b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen

2 : to hamper free movement or natural action shorts that are guaranteed not to bind

3 : to become hindered from free operation Rust caused the door to bind in its frame.

4 : to exert a restraining or compelling effect a promise that binds

bind

noun

Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something that binds

b : the act of binding : the state of being bound

c : a place where binding occurs

2 music : tie sense 3

3 : a position or situation in which one is hampered, constrained, or prevented from free movement or action got a bind on his opponent

in a bind

: in trouble seem to have gotten myself in a bind

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Synonyms & Antonyms for bind

Synonyms: Verb

band, tie, truss

Synonyms: Noun

band, bond, bracelet, chain, cuff(s), fetter, handcuff(s), irons, ligature, manacle(s), shackle

Antonyms: Verb

unbind, untie

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Examples of bind in a Sentence

Verb

She bound her hair in a ponytail. The machine binds the hay into bales. He doesn't like to wear clothes that bind.

Noun

It's a real bind having to meet all these deadlines. with our vacation week fast approaching, and no arrangements for the care of our pets, we were in a serious bind
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced binding agreements with the companies — McDonald’s, Auntie Anne’s, Arby’s, Carl’s Jr., Jimmy John’s, Cinnabon, and Buffalo Wild Wings — at a news conference Thursday. Gene Johnson, BostonGlobe.com, "Fast-food chains agree to end ‘no-poaching’ policies," 12 July 2018 Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced the binding agreements with companies including Arby’s, Jimmy John’s and Cinnabon, at a news conference Thursday, July 12, 2018. Washington Post, "7 fast-food chains agree to end ‘no-poaching’ policies," 12 July 2018 Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced the binding agreements with companies including Arby's, Jimmy John's and Cinnabon, Thursday. Gene Johnson, chicagotribune.com, "Fast-food chains agree to end 'no-poaching' policies," 12 July 2018 Our liberation is bound and intertwined across age, race, gender, and all parts of our identities. Yamani Hernandez, Teen Vogue, "Abortion Funds Can Help Preserve Reproductive Rights With or Without the Supreme Court," 12 July 2018 Kallas argued no binding legal precedent requires that inmates' gender dysphoria must be treated promptly. Bruce Vielmetti, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Transgender inmate can sue over denial of hormone treatment, U.S. Appeals Court rules," 11 July 2018 China’s cooperation — implementing domestic controls on illicit substances — has occurred at the behest of the United States, not as a result of binding agreements. Matthew Garcia, USA TODAY, "What a U.S.-China trade war could mean for opioid epidemic," 6 July 2018 To continuously stoke their fires, tuna rely on a blush of iron in their muscles to bind and ferry oxygen back and forth from their ultra-efficient gills. Ali Bouzari, SFChronicle.com, "Housemade: The magic of Liholiho Yacht Club," 22 June 2018 Some Ethereum supporters believed that the theft was bound to spoil the public perception of the platform’s security, and suggested that Ethereum’s clock be rolled back. Gideon Lewis-kraus, WIRED, "The Blockchain: A Love Story—And a Horror Story," 18 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In its heyday, the newspaper was an essential institution in the city, helping bind together a vast metropolis. Tim Arango, New York Times, "Los Angeles Times, Searching for Stability, Names Norman Pearlstine Top Editor," 18 June 2018 The modified cells are infused back into the patient, bind to an antigen on the cancer cells, and kill them. Cindy Goodman, miamiherald, "Immunotherapy is giving some cancer patients a new life when they had all but given up," 25 May 2018 Crawford’s return will create a playing-time bind as Scott Kingery and Maikel Franco have both gained everyday roles from Crawford’s absence. Matt Breen, Philly.com, "J.P. Crawford takes next step toward return to Phillies," 17 May 2018 They are often used for things like helping a constituent in a bind pay a utility bill or to send flowers to someone in mourning. Fenit Nirappil, Washington Post, "D.C. lawmaker accused of anti-Semitism donated to event where Farrakhan denounced Jews," 20 Apr. 2018 Metropolitan believes farmers who don't pay for WaterFix's construction could find themselves in a bind as their water deliveries from the Delta diminish, and will turn to Metropolitan for help. Ryan Sabalow And Dale Kasler, sacbee, "Massive Delta tunnels project took a giant step forward – here’s what you need to know | The Sacramento Bee," 11 Apr. 2018 People with black hair have more melanin in general, but especially more of the subtype eumelanin, which studies have shown binds particularly well with cocaine and amphetamines. Ellen Airhart, WIRED, "The Hairy Problem With Drug Testing," 1 Apr. 2018 The artisanal production puts corporate behemoths in a public relations bind. William Clowes, Bloomberg.com, "Never Mind the Mines. In Congo, There’s Cobalt Under the House," 28 Mar. 2018 One side binds very well to the gold and keeps the serum proteins at bay. Angela Chen, The Verge, "How graphene and gold could help us test drugs and monitor cancer," 18 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bind

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for bind

Verb

Middle English, from Old English bindan; akin to Old High German bintan to bind, Greek peisma cable, Sanskrit badhnāti he ties

Noun

see bind entry 1

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Statistics for bind

Last Updated

21 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bind

The first known use of bind was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for bind

bind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to tie or wrap (something) with rope, string, etc.

: to tie the hands or feet of a person to prevent escape or movement

of clothing : to prevent free movement by fitting too tightly

bind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation

: an annoying problem

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Kids Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tie or wrap securely (as with string or rope) The machine binds the hay into bales.

2 : to hold or restrict by force or obligation The oath binds you.

3 : to wrap or cover with a bandage bind a wound

4 : to cause to be joined together closely … the increased affection which comes to bind households… —Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

5 : to fasten together and enclose in a cover bind a book

bind

noun

Kids Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation I'm in a real bind.

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Medical Definition of bind 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wrap up (an injury) with a cloth : bandage binding up the gash with clean gauze

2 : to take up and hold usually by chemical forces : combine with cellulose binds water

3 : to make costive : constipate

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass

b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen

2 : to hamper free movement

bind

noun

Medical Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that binds

2 : the act of binding : the state of being bound — see double bind

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\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Legal Definition of bind 

1a : to make responsible for an obligation (as under a contract) agents have the power to bind the insurer —R. I. Mehr

b : to burden with an obligation prevented married women from binding their property —J. H. Friedenthal et al.

2 : to exert control over : constrain by legal authority this court is bound by precedent

3 : to bring (an insurance policy) into effect by an oral communication or a binder

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Comments on bind

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