bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make secure by tying His hands were bound with rope.
b : to confine, restrain, or restrict as if with bonds … she was not wholly bound in mind by her middle-class existence— Delmore Schwartz
c : to put under an obligation binds himself with an oath
d : to constrain with legal authority The court's decision binds them to pay the fine.
2a : to wrap around with something so as to enclose or cover A silk sash bound her waist.
b : bandage bind their wounds
3 : to fasten round about when wreaths of laurel bound them
4 : to tie together binding the wheat into sheaves
5a : to cause to stick together tuna and celery bound by mayonnaise
b : to take up and hold (as by chemical forces) : combine with cellulose binds water
6 : constipate Cheese tends to bind him.
7 : to make a firm commitment for a handshake binds the deal
8 : to protect, strengthen, or decorate by a band or binding a carpet bound with a gold edging
9 : to apply the parts of the cover to (a book)
10 : to set at work as an apprentice : indenture He was bound out to a tailor for one year.
11 : to cause to have an emotional attachment the emotional ties that bind us
12 : to fasten together a pin bound the ends of the scarf

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass A little milk will help the ingredients bind.
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement or natural action shorts that are guaranteed not to bind
3 : to become hindered from free operation Rust caused the door to bind in its frame.
4 : to exert a restraining or compelling effect a promise that binds

bind

noun

Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something that binds
b : the act of binding : the state of being bound
c : a place where binding occurs
2 music : tie sense 3
3 : a position or situation in which one is hampered, constrained, or prevented from free movement or action got a bind on his opponent
in a bind
: in trouble seem to have gotten myself in a bind

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Examples of bind in a Sentence

Verb

She bound her hair in a ponytail. The machine binds the hay into bales. He doesn't like to wear clothes that bind.

Noun

It's a real bind having to meet all these deadlines. with our vacation week fast approaching, and no arrangements for the care of our pets, we were in a serious bind
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Janet’s sphere of influence is bound by the four walls of her home, while her husband’s is as vast as 1960s American aeronautic technology will allow. Gavanndra Hodge, WSJ, "Claire Foy Steps Into the Spotlight," 9 Jan. 2019 If next week is anything like the premiere episode, there are bound to be lots of exciting surprises. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "Susan Boyle's Golden Buzzer on 'AGT: The Champions' Sparks Heated Debate," 8 Jan. 2019 Colton Underwood's search for love is bound to be a wild ride. Anna Moeslein, Glamour, "The Bachelor Season Premiere Recap: Did You Know Colton's a Virgin?," 7 Jan. 2019 Cancers, with their emotional side, are bound to get sucked into this relationship drama. De Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Which Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen Movie You Should Watch According to Your Zodiac Sign," 2 Jan. 2019 As more manufacturers hit the 200,000-car limit, the varying levels of available tax credits are bound to confuse buyers and complicate their decisions. Eric Limer, Popular Mechanics, "The $7,500 Tax Credit for Buying an Electric Chevy Might Be Disappearing," 2 Jan. 2019 Fourteen years after the show last aired, a lot of things are bound to have changed in the lives of Lizzie, Miranda, and Gordo. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Hillary Duff Just Pretty Much Confirmed a Lizzie McGuire Reboot is Happening," 31 Dec. 2018 Consider amping up any little black dress with Kylie Jenner's peony-colored lids, or artist Carolina Gonzalez's iridescent lip, as seen on Victoria's Secret angel Candice Swanepoel—the extra effort is bound to make fellow merry makers swoon. Jenna Rennert, Vogue, "7 Easy and Festive Makeup Ideas To Amp Up Any Holiday Party," 22 Dec. 2018 Which is bound to happen sometimes, even with the best filmmakers. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "Vice doesn’t want to humanize Dick Cheney. So instead, it (maybe) demonizes America.," 21 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

After an uneventful second inning, Peters put himself in another bind in the third when the Phillies loaded the bases one again. Clark Spencer, miamiherald, "Marlins get hammered by Phillies’ home run derby | Miami Herald," 7 Apr. 2018 Why did the mind that later turned stone into water bind this lush exoticism with such strong edges? Kenyon Gradert, WSJ, "Antoni Gaudí’s Surprisingly Straight Structure," 9 Mar. 2018 The resulting market shortage spiked prices, since suppliers knew their customers were suddenly in a bind. Diana Budds, Curbed, "How Trump’s tariffs are affecting the furniture industry," 7 Aug. 2018 In a paper published online on June 21st, also in Neuron, Moir and colleagues reported that amyloid beta peptides bind to and entrap HSV-1 and HHV-6, thereby helping to protect against infection. Melinda Wenner Moyer, Scientific American, "Harder Evidence Builds that Viruses Play a Role in Alzheimer’s," 21 June 2018 One is that data bind users to you; the other is that data give you an anti-competitive edge. The Economist, "A memo to big techThe techlash against Amazon, Facebook and Google—and what they can do," 20 Jan. 2018 In its heyday, the newspaper was an essential institution in the city, helping bind together a vast metropolis. Tim Arango, New York Times, "Los Angeles Times, Searching for Stability, Names Norman Pearlstine Top Editor," 18 June 2018 The modified cells are infused back into the patient, bind to an antigen on the cancer cells, and kill them. Cindy Goodman, miamiherald, "Immunotherapy is giving some cancer patients a new life when they had all but given up," 25 May 2018 Crawford’s return will create a playing-time bind as Scott Kingery and Maikel Franco have both gained everyday roles from Crawford’s absence. Matt Breen, Philly.com, "J.P. Crawford takes next step toward return to Phillies," 17 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bind

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for bind

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English bindan; akin to Old High German bintan to bind, Greek peisma cable, Sanskrit badhnāti he ties

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Learn More about bind

Statistics for bind

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bind

The first known use of bind was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for bind

bind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to tie or wrap (something) with rope, string, etc.

: to tie the hands or feet of a person to prevent escape or movement

of clothing : to prevent free movement by fitting too tightly

bind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation

: an annoying problem

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Kids Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tie or wrap securely (as with string or rope) The machine binds the hay into bales.
2 : to hold or restrict by force or obligation The oath binds you.
3 : to wrap or cover with a bandage bind a wound
4 : to cause to be joined together closely … the increased affection which comes to bind households…— Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
5 : to fasten together and enclose in a cover bind a book

bind

noun

Kids Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation I'm in a real bind.

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Medical Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wrap up (an injury) with a cloth : bandage binding up the gash with clean gauze
2 : to take up and hold usually by chemical forces : combine with cellulose binds water
3 : to make costive : constipate

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement

bind

noun

Medical Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that binds
2 : the act of binding : the state of being bound — see double bind

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\ ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Legal Definition of bind

1a : to make responsible for an obligation (as under a contract) agents have the power to bind the insurer— R. I. Mehr
b : to burden with an obligation prevented married women from binding their property— J. H. Friedenthal et al.
2 : to exert control over : constrain by legal authority this court is bound by precedent
3 : to bring (an insurance policy) into effect by an oral communication or a binder

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More from Merriam-Webster on bind

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with bind

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bind

Spanish Central: Translation of bind

Nglish: Translation of bind for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bind for Arabic Speakers

Comments on bind

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