bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bind (audio) \; binding

Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make secure by tying His hands were bound with rope.
b : to confine, restrain, or restrict as if with bonds … she was not wholly bound in mind by her middle-class existence— Delmore Schwartz
c : to put under an obligation binds himself with an oath
d : to constrain with legal authority The court's decision binds them to pay the fine.
2a : to wrap around with something so as to enclose or cover A silk sash bound her waist.
b : bandage bind their wounds
3 : to fasten round about when wreaths of laurel bound them
4 : to tie together binding the wheat into sheaves
5a : to cause to stick together tuna and celery bound by mayonnaise
b : to take up and hold (as by chemical forces) : combine with cellulose binds water
6 : constipate Cheese tends to bind him.
7 : to make a firm commitment for a handshake binds the deal
8 : to protect, strengthen, or decorate by a band or binding a carpet bound with a gold edging
9 : to apply the parts of the cover to (a book)
10 : to set at work as an apprentice : indenture He was bound out to a tailor for one year.
11 : to cause to have an emotional attachment the emotional ties that bind us
12 : to fasten together a pin bound the ends of the scarf

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass A little milk will help the ingredients bind.
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement or natural action shorts that are guaranteed not to bind
3 : to become hindered from free operation Rust caused the door to bind in its frame.
4 : to exert a restraining or compelling effect a promise that binds

bind

noun

Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something that binds
b : the act of binding : the state of being bound
c : a place where binding occurs
2 music : tie sense 3
3 : a position or situation in which one is hampered, constrained, or prevented from free movement or action got a bind on his opponent
in a bind
: in trouble seem to have gotten myself in a bind

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Examples of bind in a Sentence

Verb She bound her hair in a ponytail. The machine binds the hay into bales. He doesn't like to wear clothes that bind. Noun It's a real bind having to meet all these deadlines. with our vacation week fast approaching, and no arrangements for the care of our pets, we were in a serious bind
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Blood clots are formed by platelets, which bind together to form a clot, and typically a lot of them are needed to do that. Jim Daley, Scientific American, 23 Apr. 2021 One of those mutations helps the virus bind more tightly to cells, potentially improving its chances of a successful infection. BostonGlobe.com, 7 June 2021 The lease extension would bind the Angels to Tempe for spring training through 2035, with options to play there through 2045. Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times, 28 May 2021 Tax language in the settlement agreement will not bind the IRS or the courts in any subsequent tax dispute. Robert W. Wood, Forbes, 19 Apr. 2021 Biden's bipartisan commission, which will have a six-month deadline, wouldn't bind the White House to action. John Fritze, USA TODAY, 9 Apr. 2021 Many of the coronavirus variants now in circulation have key mutations in their spike proteins that help the virus bind more tightly to human cells or evade some kinds of antibodies. New York Times, 28 Apr. 2021 Yet the ties that bind these two animals, though at first glance nonexistent, are on the contrary so strict that were they to be modified, the consequences would be so numerous and profound as to be unimaginable. Longreads, 23 Mar. 2021 These strains involve changes along the surface spike proteins that allow the pathogen to bind more tightly to healthy cells. Kayla Rivas, Fox News, 22 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The terrible bind that the belligerent and paranoid leaders of the past have placed us in is striking. Andre Pagliarini, The New Republic, 16 Apr. 2021 Alina ends up in quite the bind because of Reddington. Alamin Yohannes, EW.com, 3 Apr. 2021 That will create a particular bind for Georgia’s two incumbent Republican senators, David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler. Jordan Fabian, Bloomberg.com, 28 Dec. 2020 After spending six innings trying to rankle West Virginia starter Jackson Wolf, Texas finally had the wiry 6-foot-7 lefty in a bind. Nick Moyle, San Antonio Express-News, 26 May 2021 But when injuries left the Colts in a bind early in the 2018 season, the rookie started at right tackle. Mark Inabinett | Minabinett@al.com, al, 23 May 2021 The ongoing crisis in the Gaza region has put India’s right-wing in a bind. Manavi Kapur, Quartz, 21 May 2021 That advice puts budget airlines such as EasyJet, which makes about 80% of its revenues from leisure travel, in a bind. Jeremy Kahn, Fortune, 20 May 2021 This bind revealed the extent to which the female journalist’s power of exposure—of herself and of others—paled next to the powers that men enjoyed, including the power of the ballot. Katy Waldman, The New Yorker, 29 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bind

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for bind

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English bindan; akin to Old High German bintan to bind, Greek peisma cable, Sanskrit badhnāti he ties

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Time Traveler for bind

Time Traveler

The first known use of bind was before the 12th century

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Statistics for bind

Last Updated

23 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Bind.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bind. Accessed 24 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for bind

bind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to tie or wrap (something) with rope, string, etc.
: to tie the hands or feet of a person to prevent escape or movement
of clothing : to prevent free movement by fitting too tightly

bind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation
British : an annoying problem

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Kids Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tie or wrap securely (as with string or rope) The machine binds the hay into bales.
2 : to hold or restrict by force or obligation The oath binds you.
3 : to wrap or cover with a bandage bind a wound
4 : to cause to be joined together closely … the increased affection which comes to bind households…— Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
5 : to fasten together and enclose in a cover bind a book

bind

noun

Kids Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation I'm in a real bind.

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bind (audio) \; binding

Medical Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wrap up (an injury) with a cloth : bandage binding up the gash with clean gauze
2 : to take up and hold usually by chemical forces : combine with cellulose binds water
3 : to make costive : constipate

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement

bind

noun

Medical Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that binds
2 : the act of binding : the state of being bound — see double bind

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\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bind (audio) \; binding

Legal Definition of bind

1a : to make responsible for an obligation (as under a contract) agents have the power to bind the insurer— R. I. Mehr
b : to burden with an obligation prevented married women from binding their property— J. H. Friedenthal et al.
2 : to exert control over : constrain by legal authority this court is bound by precedent
3 : to bring (an insurance policy) into effect by an oral communication or a binder

More from Merriam-Webster on bind

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bind

Nglish: Translation of bind for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bind for Arabic Speakers

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