bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bind (audio) \; binding

Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make secure by tying His hands were bound with rope.
b : to confine, restrain, or restrict as if with bonds … she was not wholly bound in mind by her middle-class existence— Delmore Schwartz
c : to put under an obligation binds himself with an oath
d : to constrain with legal authority The court's decision binds them to pay the fine.
2a : to wrap around with something so as to enclose or cover A silk sash bound her waist.
b : bandage bind their wounds
3 : to fasten round about when wreaths of laurel bound them
4 : to tie together binding the wheat into sheaves
5a : to cause to stick together tuna and celery bound by mayonnaise
b : to take up and hold (as by chemical forces) : combine with cellulose binds water
6 : constipate Cheese tends to bind him.
7 : to make a firm commitment for a handshake binds the deal
8 : to protect, strengthen, or decorate by a band or binding a carpet bound with a gold edging
9 : to apply the parts of the cover to (a book)
10 : to set at work as an apprentice : indenture He was bound out to a tailor for one year.
11 : to cause to have an emotional attachment the emotional ties that bind us
12 : to fasten together a pin bound the ends of the scarf

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass A little milk will help the ingredients bind.
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement or natural action shorts that are guaranteed not to bind
3 : to become hindered from free operation Rust caused the door to bind in its frame.
4 : to exert a restraining or compelling effect a promise that binds

bind

noun

Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something that binds
b : the act of binding : the state of being bound
c : a place where binding occurs
2 music : tie sense 3
3 : a position or situation in which one is hampered, constrained, or prevented from free movement or action got a bind on his opponent
in a bind
: in trouble seem to have gotten myself in a bind

Examples of bind in a Sentence

Verb She bound her hair in a ponytail. The machine binds the hay into bales. He doesn't like to wear clothes that bind. Noun It's a real bind having to meet all these deadlines. with our vacation week fast approaching, and no arrangements for the care of our pets, we were in a serious bind
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Her team realized that those early antibodies that had once seemed so powerful would bind to the outermost region of the RBD. Wired, 28 July 2022 Nothing is sacred, except the one rule that no Parliament can bind the next. Tom Mctague, The Atlantic, 15 July 2022 Instead, both the inability to abide by the norms which bind everyone else and the casual and foolish falsehood which followed speak to flaws in Johnson's makeup. Rosa Prince, CNN, 7 July 2022 Some mosses even use the ammonia from car exhaust as a nutrient, while others bind heavy metals and metabolize fine dust. Jamie Hailstone, Forbes, 20 June 2022 Face serums are meant to absorb into the skin and offer replenishing active ingredients, while a moisturizer works on the surface to create a barrier and bind skin cells together. Grooming Playbook, The Salt Lake Tribune, 7 June 2022 As long as the risk of getting caught dispensing misinformation does not outweigh the reward of using a fib to get a huge threat out of the way and bind an important player closer to you and your cause, then let 'er rip! Dalton Ross, EW.com, 5 May 2022 Arizona’s arid climate means the discs can bind carbon dioxide when left outside for about 30 minutes to an hour, sucking the pervasive greenhouse gas out of the air. Zayna Syed, The Arizona Republic, 22 Apr. 2022 It’s a Mexican form of kinship that can bind even unrelated people tighter than blood. San Diego Union-Tribune, 12 Apr. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The purchases are putting residents in a bind, since most mobile homes — despite the name — cannot be moved easily or cheaply. Laura Blasey, Los Angeles Times, 27 July 2022 The purchases are putting residents in a bind, since most mobile homes — despite the name — cannot be moved easily or cheaply. CBS News, 26 July 2022 The purchases are putting residents in a bind, since most mobile homes — despite the name — cannot be moved easily or cheaply. Michael Casey And Carolyn Thompson, Anchorage Daily News, 25 July 2022 Adolescent girls are subject to a cascade of simultaneous and often conflicting stressors—a veritable unreasonable bind of elevated expectations. Jessica L. Borelli, Scientific American, 17 June 2022 Black Violin at Wolf Trap: With its audience base shrinking, classical music is in a bind to maintain its relevance — and Black Violin may hold the key to its future. Chris Kelly, Washington Post, 2 June 2022 Russia’s war in Ukraine, helmed by an apparently psychopathic Vladimir Putin, rages on as the atrocities mount and the Western world finds itself in a horrible bind. Erik Kain, Forbes, 15 Mar. 2022 With Indiana's roster in flux, and rumblings of Suns star and restricted free agent Deandre Ayton potentially joining the team, Carlisle was in a bind. James Boyd, The Indianapolis Star, 13 July 2022 This bind is impossible to negotiate, and there are significant mental health costs of having to do so. Jessica L. Borelli, Scientific American, 17 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of bind

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for bind

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English bindan; akin to Old High German bintan to bind, Greek peisma cable, Sanskrit badhnāti he ties

Learn More About bind

Time Traveler for bind

Time Traveler

The first known use of bind was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near bind

Binche lace

bind

binder

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for bind

Last Updated

10 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Bind.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bind. Accessed 12 Aug. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for bind

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Kids Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tie or wrap securely (as with string or rope) The machine binds the hay into bales.
2 : to hold or restrict by force or obligation The oath binds you.
3 : to wrap or cover with a bandage bind a wound
4 : to cause to be joined together closely … the increased affection which comes to bind households…— Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
5 : to fasten together and enclose in a cover bind a book

bind

noun

Kids Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation I'm in a real bind.

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bind (audio) \; binding

Medical Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wrap up (an injury) with a cloth : bandage binding up the gash with clean gauze
2 : to take up and hold usually by chemical forces : combine with cellulose binds water
3 : to make costive : constipate

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement

bind

noun

Medical Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that binds
2 : the act of binding : the state of being bound — see double bind

bind

transitive verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bind (audio) \; binding

Legal Definition of bind

1a : to make responsible for an obligation (as under a contract) agents have the power to bind the insurer— R. I. Mehr
b : to burden with an obligation prevented married women from binding their property— J. H. Friedenthal et al.
2 : to exert control over : constrain by legal authority this court is bound by precedent
3 : to bring (an insurance policy) into effect by an oral communication or a binder

More from Merriam-Webster on bind

Nglish: Translation of bind for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bind for Arabic Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Odd Habits and Quirks

  • image1926873504
  • Which of the following best describes an easily irritated person?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!