bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bound (audio) \; binding

Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make secure by tying His hands were bound with rope.
b : to confine, restrain, or restrict as if with bonds … she was not wholly bound in mind by her middle-class existence— Delmore Schwartz
c : to put under an obligation binds himself with an oath
d : to constrain with legal authority The court's decision binds them to pay the fine.
2a : to wrap around with something so as to enclose or cover A silk sash bound her waist.
b : bandage bind their wounds
3 : to fasten round about when wreaths of laurel bound them
4 : to tie together binding the wheat into sheaves
5a : to cause to stick together tuna and celery bound by mayonnaise
b : to take up and hold (as by chemical forces) : combine with cellulose binds water
6 : constipate Cheese tends to bind him.
7 : to make a firm commitment for a handshake binds the deal
8 : to protect, strengthen, or decorate by a band or binding a carpet bound with a gold edging
9 : to apply the parts of the cover to (a book)
10 : to set at work as an apprentice : indenture He was bound out to a tailor for one year.
11 : to cause to have an emotional attachment the emotional ties that bind us
12 : to fasten together a pin bound the ends of the scarf

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass A little milk will help the ingredients bind.
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement or natural action shorts that are guaranteed not to bind
3 : to become hindered from free operation Rust caused the door to bind in its frame.
4 : to exert a restraining or compelling effect a promise that binds

bind

noun

Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something that binds
b : the act of binding : the state of being bound
c : a place where binding occurs
2 music : tie sense 3
3 : a position or situation in which one is hampered, constrained, or prevented from free movement or action got a bind on his opponent
in a bind
: in trouble seem to have gotten myself in a bind

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Examples of bind in a Sentence

Verb She bound her hair in a ponytail. The machine binds the hay into bales. He doesn't like to wear clothes that bind. Noun It's a real bind having to meet all these deadlines. with our vacation week fast approaching, and no arrangements for the care of our pets, we were in a serious bind
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Get ready for: odes to the national pastime, paeans on how baseball can bind us together, will be a welcome distraction, is a symbol of unity and hope, an illustration of normalcy. Ann Killion, SFChronicle.com, "Get ready for A’s and Giants! As well as MLB’s patchwork protocol, trust issues," 28 June 2020 Some experts believe the drug might help control COVID-19 in part by blocking the virus’ ability to bind to the body’s cells. Alice Park, Time, "WHO Resumes Study of Hydroxychloroquine for Treating COVID-19," 3 June 2020 All of us as academic leaders can help to bind the gaping wounds of racial injustice that have, once again, been laid bare for all the world to see. Time, "The Righteous Revulsion Driving the Demands for Racial Change in America," 19 June 2020 That is an opportunity to bind yourself to other human beings. Polly Campbell, Cincinnati.com, "How to have better dinner table conversations, from someone who's done it for a living," 19 June 2020 The government has named only Bolton as a defendant in the lawsuit, but argued in Wednesday's filing that if a court enjoins Bolton then its order should also bind his publisher, Simon & Schuster. Anchorage Daily News, "Justice Department seeks emergency order to block publication of Bolton’s book," 18 June 2020 The fabric of our lives is indeed the total of the threads that bind us as a nation. Brenda Yenke, cleveland, "Honoring our national symbol: Yenke Peddler antiques column," 11 June 2020 To infect a host, the spikes on the outside of the novel coronavirus need to bind to the right receptor on a cell, much like a key and a keyhole. Amanda Morris, azcentral, "Mice can't catch COVID-19, so a UA lab is making new kind of mouse," 10 June 2020 These antibodies bind to the virus, potentially disabling it from attacking human cells. Eliza Mackintosh, CNN, "What you need to know about coronavirus on Wednesday, June 10," 10 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In most industries, this would absolutely not be considered appropriate to do and would burn a bridge as the first comany is now left in a bind. The Washington Post, "Color of Money: The racial wealth gap in America," 18 June 2020 That strain has a genetic mutation affecting what is called the spike protein - the structure that lets the virus bind to receptor cells in humans. Anchorage Daily News, "The ultimate COVID-19 mystery: Why does it spare some and kill others?," 17 June 2020 This has put her champions in a bind—upholding her letters as eloquently expressive of her character, but carving out exceptions for the nasty parts. Paul Elie, The New Yorker, "How Racist Was Flannery O’Connor?," 15 June 2020 To close entirely could mean a serious financial hit for camps, putting many parents who rely on them for child care during the summer in a bind. Corbett Smith, Dallas News, "Pandemic forces summer camps to re-think programming and families to adjust expectations," 2 June 2020 The pandemic and unrest together have trapped the country in a bind. Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic, "The Protests Will Spread the Coronavirus," 1 June 2020 That puts travelers like Shiellynn Cullin of suburban Atlanta in a bind. NBC News, "Coronavirus means an uncertain future for businesses and cities that depend on yearly black events," 11 June 2020 April McClung and her husband, Lacy, were in a bind. Bob Carlton | Bcarlton@al.com, al, "The inspiring story behind these heavenly Alabama cakes," 11 June 2020 This puts parents in a bind: Open the door to social media earlier than planned—or be the bad guy? Julie Jargon, WSJ, "Facebook Messenger Kids: How Young Is Too Young for a Chat App?," 12 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bind

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for bind

Verb and Noun

Middle English, from Old English bindan; akin to Old High German bintan to bind, Greek peisma cable, Sanskrit badhnāti he ties

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Time Traveler for bind

Time Traveler

The first known use of bind was before the 12th century

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Statistics for bind

Last Updated

4 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Bind.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bind. Accessed 14 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for bind

bind

verb
How to pronounce bind (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to tie or wrap (something) with rope, string, etc.
: to tie the hands or feet of a person to prevent escape or movement
of clothing : to prevent free movement by fitting too tightly

bind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation
British : an annoying problem

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Kids Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tie or wrap securely (as with string or rope) The machine binds the hay into bales.
2 : to hold or restrict by force or obligation The oath binds you.
3 : to wrap or cover with a bandage bind a wound
4 : to cause to be joined together closely … the increased affection which comes to bind households…— Louisa May Alcott, Little Women
5 : to fasten together and enclose in a cover bind a book

bind

noun

Kids Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation I'm in a real bind.

bind

verb
\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bound (audio) \; binding

Medical Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wrap up (an injury) with a cloth : bandage binding up the gash with clean gauze
2 : to take up and hold usually by chemical forces : combine with cellulose binds water
3 : to make costive : constipate

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass
b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen
2 : to hamper free movement

bind

noun

Medical Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that binds
2 : the act of binding : the state of being bound — see double bind

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\ ˈbīnd How to pronounce bind (audio) \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd How to pronounce bound (audio) \; binding

Legal Definition of bind

1a : to make responsible for an obligation (as under a contract) agents have the power to bind the insurer— R. I. Mehr
b : to burden with an obligation prevented married women from binding their property— J. H. Friedenthal et al.
2 : to exert control over : constrain by legal authority this court is bound by precedent
3 : to bring (an insurance policy) into effect by an oral communication or a binder

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More from Merriam-Webster on bind

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bind

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with bind

Spanish Central: Translation of bind

Nglish: Translation of bind for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bind for Arabic Speakers

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