bind

verb
\ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Definition of bind 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to make secure by tying His hands were bound with rope.

b : to confine, restrain, or restrict as if with bonds … she was not wholly bound in mind by her middle-class existence— Delmore Schwartz

c : to put under an obligation binds himself with an oath

d : to constrain with legal authority The court's decision binds them to pay the fine.

2a : to wrap around with something so as to enclose or cover A silk sash bound her waist.

b : bandage bind their wounds

3 : to fasten round about when wreaths of laurel bound them

4 : to tie together binding the wheat into sheaves

5a : to cause to stick together tuna and celery bound by mayonnaise

b : to take up and hold (as by chemical forces) : combine with cellulose binds water

6 : constipate Cheese tends to bind him.

7 : to make a firm commitment for a handshake binds the deal

8 : to protect, strengthen, or decorate by a band or binding a carpet bound with a gold edging

9 : to apply the parts of the cover to (a book)

10 : to set at work as an apprentice : indenture He was bound out to a tailor for one year.

11 : to cause to have an emotional attachment the emotional ties that bind us

12 : to fasten together a pin bound the ends of the scarf

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass A little milk will help the ingredients bind.

b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen

2 : to hamper free movement or natural action shorts that are guaranteed not to bind

3 : to become hindered from free operation Rust caused the door to bind in its frame.

4 : to exert a restraining or compelling effect a promise that binds

bind

noun

Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : something that binds

b : the act of binding : the state of being bound

c : a place where binding occurs

2 music : tie sense 3

3 : a position or situation in which one is hampered, constrained, or prevented from free movement or action got a bind on his opponent

in a bind

: in trouble seem to have gotten myself in a bind

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Examples of bind in a Sentence

Verb

She bound her hair in a ponytail. The machine binds the hay into bales. He doesn't like to wear clothes that bind.

Noun

It's a real bind having to meet all these deadlines. with our vacation week fast approaching, and no arrangements for the care of our pets, we were in a serious bind
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In that sense, Orlando feels like an artifact from and for the future, a character who refuses to be bound by conventions, and who invites us to consider the possibility that all of our certainties are in fact contingencies. Constance Grady, Vox, "Judy Blume’s seminal Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret is becoming a movie," 20 Oct. 2018 DJ'ing has become less about your skills as a DJ and more about your social media following, and being that bound to followers and likes takes a toll on you. Lindsey Caldwell, Glamour, "My $15 Online Pilates Class Is the Best Thing I Spend Money On," 8 Oct. 2018 And for that, her kin hunted him down, kidnapped and lynched him before binding his body to a 75-pound cotton gin fan with barbed wire and throwing him into the Tallahatchie River. Petula Dvorak, Washington Post, "Funeral for Emmett Till, lynched in 1955, unfolds every day in the nation’s capital," 12 July 2018 Carter notes how commands were sewn into their clothing, posted on their doorposts, and bound to their wrists. Harry Bruinius, The Christian Science Monitor, "In Plains, Ga., an evangelical politician like no other," 11 July 2018 Elements of the Temple service were therefore repeated in some form in order to bind Jews to their glorious past. Rabbi Avi Weiss, Jewish Journal, "Why do we pray with a set text?," 2 July 2018 Other times, Houdini allowed his arms and legs to be bound and then was nailed into a packing crate weighted with lead. Mary Carole Mccauley, baltimoresun.com, "Behind the magic of Harry Houdini at the Jewish Museum of Maryland," 29 June 2018 Gooch wasn't knocked out with the Taser, so Lipka had to bind and gag her. refinery29.com, "American Animals," 20 June 2018 No community in the bay is so identified with the blue crab, so economically bound to the small but com-bative creature, as Tangier. Earl Swift, Outside Online, "The Incredible True Story of the Henrietta C.," 20 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The resulting market shortage spiked prices, since suppliers knew their customers were suddenly in a bind. Diana Budds, Curbed, "How Trump’s tariffs are affecting the furniture industry," 7 Aug. 2018 In a paper published online on June 21st, also in Neuron, Moir and colleagues reported that amyloid beta peptides bind to and entrap HSV-1 and HHV-6, thereby helping to protect against infection. Melinda Wenner Moyer, Scientific American, "Harder Evidence Builds that Viruses Play a Role in Alzheimer’s," 21 June 2018 One is that data bind users to you; the other is that data give you an anti-competitive edge. The Economist, "A memo to big techThe techlash against Amazon, Facebook and Google—and what they can do," 20 Jan. 2018 In its heyday, the newspaper was an essential institution in the city, helping bind together a vast metropolis. Tim Arango, New York Times, "Los Angeles Times, Searching for Stability, Names Norman Pearlstine Top Editor," 18 June 2018 The modified cells are infused back into the patient, bind to an antigen on the cancer cells, and kill them. Cindy Goodman, miamiherald, "Immunotherapy is giving some cancer patients a new life when they had all but given up," 25 May 2018 Crawford’s return will create a playing-time bind as Scott Kingery and Maikel Franco have both gained everyday roles from Crawford’s absence. Matt Breen, Philly.com, "J.P. Crawford takes next step toward return to Phillies," 17 May 2018 They are often used for things like helping a constituent in a bind pay a utility bill or to send flowers to someone in mourning. Fenit Nirappil, Washington Post, "D.C. lawmaker accused of anti-Semitism donated to event where Farrakhan denounced Jews," 20 Apr. 2018 Metropolitan believes farmers who don't pay for WaterFix's construction could find themselves in a bind as their water deliveries from the Delta diminish, and will turn to Metropolitan for help. Ryan Sabalow And Dale Kasler, sacbee, "Massive Delta tunnels project took a giant step forward – here’s what you need to know | The Sacramento Bee," 11 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bind

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1b

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for bind

Verb

Middle English, from Old English bindan; akin to Old High German bintan to bind, Greek peisma cable, Sanskrit badhnāti he ties

Noun

see bind entry 1

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Statistics for bind

Last Updated

16 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bind

The first known use of bind was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for bind

bind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to tie or wrap (something) with rope, string, etc.

: to tie the hands or feet of a person to prevent escape or movement

of clothing : to prevent free movement by fitting too tightly

bind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation

: an annoying problem

bind

verb
\ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Kids Definition of bind

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to tie or wrap securely (as with string or rope) The machine binds the hay into bales.

2 : to hold or restrict by force or obligation The oath binds you.

3 : to wrap or cover with a bandage bind a wound

4 : to cause to be joined together closely … the increased affection which comes to bind households…— Louisa May Alcott, Little Women

5 : to fasten together and enclose in a cover bind a book

bind

noun

Kids Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

: a difficult situation I'm in a real bind.

bind

verb
\ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Medical Definition of bind 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to wrap up (an injury) with a cloth : bandage binding up the gash with clean gauze

2 : to take up and hold usually by chemical forces : combine with cellulose binds water

3 : to make costive : constipate

intransitive verb

1a : to form a cohesive mass

b : to combine or be taken up especially by chemical action antibody binds to a specific antigen

2 : to hamper free movement

bind

noun

Medical Definition of bind (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something that binds

2 : the act of binding : the state of being bound — see double bind

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\ˈbīnd \
bound\ ˈbau̇nd \; binding

Legal Definition of bind 

1a : to make responsible for an obligation (as under a contract) agents have the power to bind the insurer— R. I. Mehr

b : to burden with an obligation prevented married women from binding their property— J. H. Friedenthal et al.

2 : to exert control over : constrain by legal authority this court is bound by precedent

3 : to bring (an insurance policy) into effect by an oral communication or a binder

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Comments on bind

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