blind

adjective
\ˈblīnd \

Definition of blind 

(Entry 1 of 4)

1a(1) : sightless

(2) : having less than ¹/₁₀ of normal vision in the more efficient eye when refractive defects are fully corrected by lenses

b : of or relating to sightless persons

2a : unable or unwilling to discern or judge blind to a lover's faults

b : unquestioning blind loyalty

3a : having no regard to rational discrimination, guidance, or restriction blind choice

b : lacking a directing or controlling consciousness blind chance

c : drunk sense 1a

4a : made or done without sight of certain objects or knowledge of certain facts that could serve for guidance or cause bias a blind taste test — compare double-blind, single-blind

b : having no knowledge of information that may cause bias during the course of an experiment or test physicians blind to whether the test drug is administered

5 : defective: such as

a : lacking a growing point or producing leaves instead of flowers

b : lacking a complete or legible address blind mail

6a : difficult to discern, make out, or discover

b : hidden from sight : covered blind seam

7 : having but one opening or outlet blind sockets

8 : having no opening for light or passage : blank blind wall

blind

verb
blinded; blinding; blinds

Definition of blind (Entry 2 of 4)

transitive verb

1a : to make blind

b : dazzle

2a : to withhold light from

b : hide, conceal

blind

noun

Definition of blind (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : something to hinder sight or keep out light: such as

a : a window shutter

b : a roller window shade

c : venetian blind

d : blinder

2 : a place of concealment especially : a concealing enclosure from which one may shoot game or observe wildlife

3a : something put forward for the purpose of misleading : subterfuge

b : a person who acts as a decoy or distraction

blind

adverb

Definition of blind (Entry 4 of 4)

1 : blindly: such as

a : to the point of insensibility blind drunk

b : without seeing outside an airplane fly blind

c : without knowledge of certain facts that could serve for guidance or cause bias tasted the wine blind

2 used as an intensive was robbed blind

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Other Words from blind

Adjective

blindly \ ˈblīn(d)-​lē \ adverb
blindness \ ˈblīn(d)-​nəs \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for blind

Synonyms: Adjective

besotted, blasted [slang], blitzed [slang], blotto [slang], bombed, boozy, canned [slang], cockeyed, crocked, drunk, drunken, fried, gassed, hammered [slang], high, impaired, inebriate, inebriated, intoxicated, juiced [slang], lit, lit up, loaded [slang], looped, oiled [slang], pickled, pie-eyed, plastered, potted [slang], ripped [slang], sloshed [slang], smashed [slang], sottish, soused, sozzled, squiffed (or squiffy), stewed, stiff, stinking [slang], stoned, tanked [slang], tiddly [chiefly British], tight, tipsy, wasted [slang], wet, wiped out [slang]

Synonyms: Verb

bedazzle, daze, dazzle

Antonyms: Adjective

sober, straight

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Examples of blind in a Sentence

Adjective

our old blind cat kept walking into walls and furniture you'd have to be really blind to think that was a good idea

Verb

She was blinded as a child in a terrible fire. I was blinded by the sun as I came around the corner. He was blinded by love.

Noun

Some say the investigation is a blind to keep the public's attention off the governor.

Adverb

They had to fly blind through heavy smoke.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

The number of vehicles that come with lane-departure warnings and blind-spot warnings is also rising. Adrienne Roberts, WSJ, "U.S. Road Deaths Fell in 2017," 3 Oct. 2018 Lucia—nicknamed LuBird—is in a wheelchair, legally blind, and nonverbal. Megan Barber, Curbed, "Why cities need accessible playgrounds," 20 July 2018 Neymar orchestrated Brazil’s opener six minutes into the second half, cutting menacingly from left to right across the 18-yard line, tugging three defenders along with him, before smacking a blind, back heel pass to Willian, reversing the play. Andrew Keh, New York Times, "Brazil’s Joy Is Mexico’s Heartbreak in World Cup Knockout," 4 July 2018 His bunker shot was blind, as the lip was severe, but relatively straightforward. Daniel Rapaport, SI.com, "Tiger Woods Shoots 78 in First Round of U.S. Open at Shinnecock," 14 June 2018 The standard amenities in the GT range from safety electronics such as blind-spot monitoring, forward collision warning, and automatic emergency braking, to hedonism such as heated front seats, a sunroof, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto. Al Haas, Philly.com, "Volkswagen offers a roomy 2018 Passat GT that's fun to play with," 31 May 2018 Features like forward collision warning with auto-braking, blind-spot detection, and video backup cameras are now being offered as standard features or low-cost options on a growing number of models. NBC News, "What's new at this year's New York Auto Show," 3 Apr. 2018 There, the company’s adventurous new artistic director, Michelle Terry, is starring as the Prince of Denmark in a gender-blind production directed by the (female) team of Federay Holmes and Elle White. Ben Brantley, New York Times, "Women Set London’s Stages Ablaze," 9 July 2018 Patrons can choose their favorite and see who brewers choose from a double-blind tasting. Kathy Flanigan, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Start making pretzel necklaces now: Beer festival season is in full pour," 9 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

One family tried desperately to bleach themselves and their homes to keep away the contagion, blinding themselves in the process. Verge Staff, The Verge, "Seven scary stories to tell by the light of your screen," 31 Oct. 2018 The press continues to treat Mr. Trump’s election as a terrible accident that never should have been allowed to happen, yet blinds itself to the most interesting part of the story. WSJ, "Dogs Bite Men and Trumps Duck Taxes," 5 Oct. 2018 But to be equally clear, our refusal to acknowledge the drug war’s ever-present failure, including our refusal to consider abolishing the DEA, impoverishes analysis and blinds us to possible alternatives. Kathleen Frydl, Vox, "Why we should abolish ICE — and the DEA too," 14 Aug. 2018 The tiny lesions, which contain buildup from cell debris and calcium, even eroded through her conjunctival surface... and could have blinded her permanently. refinery29.com, "You'll Never Fall Asleep With Mascara On Again After Seeing This," 31 May 2018 On a more tactical note, don’t let discounts blind you to hard numbers. Charlotte Cowles, The Cut, "How Can I Shop a Sale Without Losing My Head?," 18 May 2018 The time, the money and the emotion parents invest in their children’s athletic success blinds them. Carlos Monarrez, Detroit Free Press, "Parents must be willing to crush athletic dreams to protect their kids," 28 Jan. 2018 Other soft ways to achieve a soft kill include destroying the engine of a car or truck, forcing it to stop, or precisely targeting sensors on ships and aircraft, blinding them to enemy attack. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "How the Military Will Be Revolutionized By Laser Weaponry," 11 Mar. 2016 By Robert Kurson A true story about a man, blinded at age 2, who grows up to become an accomplished entrepreneur, skier, and family man. Sarah Mupo, STAT, "The 39 best health and science books to read this summer," 25 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The other threats here are window blinds and their related parts. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Emergency Responders Share 9 of the Biggest Death Traps in Your Home," 14 July 2018 To clean blinds and lampshades, and for general dusting, opt for a microfiber duster, like OXO’s Delicate Duster ($6.99, oxo.com) over a feather duster. Microfibers trap dust rather than just moving it around, Johnson said. Debbie Carlson, chicagotribune.com, "5 areas to tackle during spring cleaning," 22 May 2018 The other involved a young hunter who fired at a rabbit from an elevated blind and the .22 caliber bullet hit, perhaps as a ricochet, and killed another young person who was about 150 yards away, walking unseen toward the blind. Shannon Thompkins, San Antonio Express-News, "There’s safety in numbers for Texas’ hunters," 8 Mar. 2018 At a certain point, one goes ivory blind and the attention afforded to you in a bridal consultation becomes addictive. Carrie Goldberg, Harper's BAZAAR, "10 Mistakes to Avoid When Shopping for a Wedding Dress," 5 June 2018 The Boston sports landscape is blooming wildly this spring, and yet everyone only seems predominantly interested in peeking between the blinds in Foxborough. Conor Orr, SI.com, "So What If Tom Brady Skips Patriots' OTAs?," 21 May 2018 Aside from one of those larger units being visible from our windows and a few hikers passing by on the road, there was ample privacy in our unit, especially with the blinds drawn. Chelsey Lewis, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "This tiny house in Wisconsin's Northwoods is a big escape," 1 Feb. 2018 Com, an online retailer that two years ago decided to quit selling corded blinds for safety reasons. Rick Schmitt, kansascity, "Fight to stop child strangulation deaths from window blinds reaches milestone," 26 Jan. 2018 According to a 2018 Pediatrics study, from 1990 to 2015, injuries related to window blinds sent nearly 17,000 children under 6 to the emergency room. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Emergency Responders Share 9 of the Biggest Death Traps in Your Home," 14 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'blind.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of blind

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1633, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Adverb

1698, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for blind

Adjective

Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German blint blind, Old English blandan to mix — more at blend

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Statistics for blind

Last Updated

13 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for blind

The first known use of blind was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for blind

blind

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of blind

 (Entry 1 of 4)

: unable to see

: unable to notice or judge something

: accepting the actions or decisions of someone or something without any questions or criticism

blind

verb

English Language Learners Definition of blind (Entry 2 of 4)

: to cause (someone) to be unable to see : to make (someone) blind

: to cause (someone) to be unable to see for a short time

: to cause (someone) to be unable to think clearly or to act reasonably

blind

noun

English Language Learners Definition of blind (Entry 3 of 4)

: something that is used to cover a window from the inside of a room; especially : a roll of cloth or plastic that is hung at the top of a window and pulled down over the window

: a place where hunters hide from animals while they are hunting

: something that is used to trick people or to prevent people from noticing a particular thing

blind

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of blind (Entry 4 of 4)

: without seeing outside of an airplane : using only a plane's instruments

: to the degree that you are unable to think clearly or to act reasonably

blind

adjective
\ˈblīnd \
blinder; blindest

Kids Definition of blind

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : unable or nearly unable to see

2 : lacking in judgment or understanding He is blind to his own faults.

3 : unquestioning blind faith

4 : closed at one end a blind alley

Other Words from blind

blindly adverb
blindness noun

blind

verb
blinded; blinding

Kids Definition of blind (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : to cause the permanent loss of sight in

2 : to make it impossible to see well for a short time Our driver was blinded by the sun.

blind

noun

Kids Definition of blind (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : a device to reduce sight or keep out light window blinds

2 : a place of hiding We watched the wildlife from a blind.

blind

adverb

Kids Definition of blind (Entry 4 of 4)

: with only instruments as guidance Fog made it necessary to fly blind.

blind

adjective
\ˈblīnd \

Medical Definition of blind 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : lacking or deficient in sight especially : having less than ¹/₁₀ of normal vision in the more efficient eye when refractive defects are fully corrected by lenses

b : of or relating to sightless persons blind care

2a : designed to prevent participants from having information that could cause bias a blind taste test a blind clinical trial — see double-blind, single-blind

b : having no knowledge of information that may cause bias during the course of an experiment or test researchers blind to whether the investigational drug is administered

3 : having but one opening or outlet the cecum is a blind pouch

Other Words from blind

blindly \ ˈblīn-​(d)lē \ adverb
blindness \ ˈblīn(d)-​nəs \ noun

Medical Definition of blind (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make blind

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Comments on blind

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