double-blind

adjective

dou·​ble-blind ˌdə-bəl-ˈblīnd How to pronounce double-blind (audio)
: of, relating to, or being an experimental procedure in which neither the subjects nor the experimenters know which subjects are in the test and control groups during the actual course of the experiments compare open-label, single-blind

Examples of double-blind in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web An herbal supplement containing Ma Huang-Guarana for weight loss: a randomized, double-blind trial. Amber Smith, Discover Magazine, 3 Apr. 2024 The double-blind clinical study was conducted at North Carolina State University Veterinary College, a leading vet school. Alex Zhavoronkov, Forbes, 29 Feb. 2024 Rigorous research that informed the California ban, including double-blind studies that control for variations in children’s diets, has found an association between various artificial color additives and hyperactivity. Ali Francis, Bon Appétit, 9 Feb. 2024 The suspect was identified through surveillance footage and multiple eyewitnesses who reviewed a double-blind lineup, police said. Nate Gartrell, The Mercury News, 5 Feb. 2024 The researchers then conducted a double-blind trial in which neither the participants nor the health care workers who administered the doses knew who received the malaria vaccine and who received a rabies vaccine that acted as the control. Rupendra Brahambhatt, Ars Technica, 18 Aug. 2023 There have also been promising studies on the use of Ayurvedic methods compared to Western therapies in treating knee osteoarthritis, though researchers have yet to isolate which specific factors were most beneficial, and say that further double-blind research with larger sample sizes is required. Hasina Khatib, Allure, 5 Jan. 2024 Oña is part of a group conducting the world’s first double-blind phase 2 clinical trial on ibogaine for opioid dependence. Kaitlin Sullivan, NBC News, 13 Dec. 2023 The study involved 783 participants from the U.S., Argentina, Brazil and Taiwan for 36 weeks before 670 were split for a double-blind study, in which neither the participants nor the researchers knew what the participants were taking. Ty Roush, Forbes, 11 Dec. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'double-blind.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1950, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of double-blind was in 1950

Dictionary Entries Near double-blind

Cite this Entry

“Double-blind.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/double-blind. Accessed 21 Jun. 2024.

Medical Definition

double-blind

adjective
dou·​ble-blind ˌdəb-əl-ˈblīnd How to pronounce double-blind (audio)
: of, relating to, or being an experimental procedure in which neither the subjects nor the experimenters know which subjects are in the test and control groups during the actual course of the experiments compare open-label, single-blind
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!