eye

1 of 2

noun

1
a
: a specialized light-sensitive sensory structure of animals that in nearly all vertebrates, most arthropods, and some mollusks is the image-forming organ of sight
especially : the nearly spherical usually paired hollow organ of sight in vertebrates that is filled with a jellylike material, is lined with a photosensitive retina, and is lodged in a bony orbit in the skull
b
: all the visible structures within and surrounding the orbit and including eyelids, eyelashes, and eyebrows
c(1)
: the faculty of seeing with eyes
(2)
: the faculty of intellectual or aesthetic perception or appreciation
an eye for beauty
(3)
: skill or ability dependent upon eyesight
a batter with a good eye
d
: look, glance
cast an eager eye
e(1)
: an attentive look
kept an eye on his valuables
(2)
: attention, notice
caught his eye
(3)
: close observation : scrutiny
works under the eye of her boss
in the public eye
f
: point of view, judgment
beauty is in the eye of the beholder
often used in plural
an offender in the eyes of the law
2
: something having an appearance suggestive of an eye: such as
a
: the hole through the head of a needle
b
: a usually circular marking (as on a peacock's tail)
c
: loop
especially : a loop or catch to receive a hook
d
: an undeveloped bud (as on a potato)
e
: an area like a hole in the center of a tropical cyclone marked by only light winds or complete calm with no precipitation
f
: the center of a flower especially when differently colored or marked
specifically : the disk of a composite
g(1)
: a triangular piece of beef cut from between the top and bottom of a round
(2)
: the chief muscle of a chop
(3)
: a compact mass of muscular tissue usually embedded in fat in a rib or loin cut of meat
h
: a device (such as a photoelectric cell) that functions in a manner analogous to human vision
3
: something central : center
the eye of the problemNorman Mailer
4
: the direction from which the wind is blowing
eyeless adjective
eyelike adjective

Illustration of eye

Illustration of eye
  • 1 optic nerve
  • 2 blind spot
  • 3 fovea
  • 4 sclera
  • 5 choroid
  • 6 retina
  • 7 ciliary body
  • 8 posterior chamber
  • 9 anterior chamber
  • 10 cornea
  • 11 lens
  • 12 iris
  • 13 suspensory ligament
  • 14 conjunctiva
  • 15 vitreous humor

eye

2 of 2

verb

eyed; eyeing or eying

transitive verb

1
a(1)
: to fix the eyes on : look at
they eyed him suspiciously
(2)
: contemplate, consider
eyeing the choices
b
: to watch or study closely
eyeing changes in the stock market
2
: to furnish with an eye
eyer noun
Phrases
an eye for an eye
: retribution in kind
my eye
used to express mild disagreement or sometimes surprise
a diamond, my eye! That's glass
with an eye to or less commonly with an eye toward
1
: with awareness or contemplation of
with an eye to the future
2
: with the object of
built the house with an eye to adding on later

Did you know?

The eye is an organ that receives light and visual images. Non-image forming eyes (also called direction eyes) are found among worms, mollusks, cnidarians, echinoderms, and other invertebrates. Image-forming eyes are found in certain mollusks, most arthropods, and nearly all vertebrates. Arthropods are unique in possessing a compound eye, which results in their seeing a multiple image that is partially integrated in the brain. Lower vertebrates, such as fish, have eyes on either side of the head, allowing a maximum view of the surroundings, but producing two separate fields of vision. In predatory birds and mammals, binocular vision is more important. The placement of both eyes on the front of the head permits a larger overlap of the two visual fields, resulting in a parallel line of direct sight.

Examples of eye in a Sentence

Noun Her eyes slowly became accustomed to the dark. He wears a patch over one eye. I have something in my eye. Only a trained eye can tell the difference between the original painting and a good copy. For decorating, they rely on her discerning eye. He has an artist's eye for color. He reviewed the proposal with a jaundiced eye. The biographer cast a cold eye on the artist's life. Verb I saw someone eyeing me from across the street. a lot of his backyard bird watching was spent eyeing the squirrels as they depleted the bird feeder of seeds See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The viewers, on the other hand, can’t seem to keep their eyes off the star. Krystie Lee Yandoli, Rolling Stone, 16 Feb. 2024 His eyes are shut, a flower pressed against his chest. Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times, 16 Feb. 2024 The brighter side of the picture is that within a few months, California will require teacher preparation programs to stress the science of reading with an eye on meeting the state’s new literacy standards. Dan Walters, The Mercury News, 16 Feb. 2024 Where Pedro clings to the idea that their child could be the only good thing to come out of their toxic workplace, Julia’s eyes remain open to reality and to the daily struggle for survival shared by most of the characters. David Rooney, The Hollywood Reporter, 16 Feb. 2024 Large brands have made famously tone-deaf commercials that left viewers wondering why the decision-makers lacked eyes to see the problem. Gregory Crawford, Forbes, 16 Feb. 2024 The inclusion of AHAs in any scrub is a bonus in our dermatologist and esthetician’s books, so it’s encouraged to keep an eye out for those key ingredients. Alyssa Brascia, Peoplemag, 16 Feb. 2024 Its body looks moist, and its eyes look almost black. Aspen Pflughoeft, Miami Herald, 16 Feb. 2024 The lo-fi video approach to these interviews, which lack finesse and careful lighting setups, not only imbues with a sense of danger and immediacy, but draws the eye to digital artifacts. Siddhant Adlakha, Variety, 16 Feb. 2024
Verb
Target could also be eyeing dollar-store customers, particularly after Dollar Tree raised prices above $1. Sasha Rogelberg, Fortune, 16 Feb. 2024 According to a report in The Athletic on Friday, the A’s are eyeing Sutter Health Park, the 14,000-capacity Triple-A home of the San Francisco Giants, to host them until their ballpark in Las Vegas is ready in 2028. Jason Mastrodonato, The Mercury News, 16 Feb. 2024 In Asia, the company is eyeing a $1.3 billion investment to set up an electric vehicle factory in Indonesia, and is also expected to start production in Thailand this year. Lionel Lim, Fortune Asia, 14 Feb. 2024 These will be among the last high school games played by Flagg and Edgecombe, who are both eyeing a title at the National High School Invitational (NHSI) set for April 4-6 in Brownsburg, Indiana. Adam Zagoria, Forbes, 12 Feb. 2024 Keep scrolling to explore the other comfortable, supportive, and durable travel-ready styles that our editors are eyeing. Emily Belfiore, Travel + Leisure, 10 Feb. 2024 Already, Meg could be eying another big hit, after teasing a new song with 41’s Kyle Richh, which sounded pretty promising. Carl Lamarre, Billboard, 7 Feb. 2024 Then, Speaker Mike Johnson announced on Saturday that the House would vote on a standalone bill on aid to Israel, setting a showdown between the two chambers, as the Senate is eyeing an initial vote on the supplemental funding package this week. Kaia Hubbard, CBS News, 4 Feb. 2024 Details about which correspondent might have been eyed for the assignment could not be learned, but the CBS News offer was believed to have been for a 15-minute interview, three or four minutes of which would have aired during the network’s pre-game coverage. Brian Steinberg, Variety, 3 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'eye.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English, from Old English ēage; akin to Old High German ouga eye, Latin oculus, Greek ōps eye, face, Sanskrit akṣi eye

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a(1)

Time Traveler
The first known use of eye was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near eye

Cite this Entry

“Eye.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eye. Accessed 25 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

eye

1 of 2 noun
1
a
: an organ of sight
especially : a rounded hollow organ that is filled with a jellylike material, is lined with a sensitive retina, and is located in a bone-lined cavity in the skull of a vertebrate
b
: all the visible parts (as the eyelids) within and surrounding the bone-lined cavity
2
a
: ability to see or appreciate
a good eye for painting
b
: glance entry 2 sense 3
cast an eager eye
c
: close attention or observation
keep an eye on it
d
: judgment sense 1
guilty in the eyes of the law
3
: something like or suggestive of an eye: as
a
: the hole through the head of a needle
b
: a loop to catch or receive a hook
c
: an undeveloped bud (as on a potato)
d
: a device (as a photoelectric cell) that functions somewhat like human vision
4
: the center of something
the eye of a hurricane
eyed
ˈīd
adjective
eyeless adjective
eyelike adjective

eye

2 of 2 verb
eyed; eyeing or eying
: to watch or study closely

Medical Definition

eye

noun
1
: an organ of sight
especially : a nearly spherical hollow organ that is lined with a sensitive retina, is lodged in a bony orbit in the skull, is the vertebrate organ of sight, and is normally paired
2
: all the visible structures within and surrounding the orbit and including eyelids, eyelashes, and eyebrows
3
: the faculty of seeing with eyes
eyeless adjective
eyelike adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on eye

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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