raise

verb
\ ˈrāz \
raised; raising

Definition of raise 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to cause or help to rise to a standing position
2a : awaken, arouse
b : to stir up : incite raise a rebellion
c : to flush (game) from cover
d : to recall from or as if from death
3a : to set upright by lifting or building raise a monument
b : to lift up raise your hand raise sunken treasure
c : to place higher in rank or dignity : elevate
d : heighten, invigorate raise the spirits
e : to end or suspend the operation or validity of raise a siege
4 : to get together for a purpose : collect raise funds
5a : grow, cultivate raise cotton
b : to bring to maturity : rear raise a child
c : to breed and bring (an animal) to maturity
6a : to give rise to : provoke raise a commotion
b : to give voice to raise a cheer
7 : to bring up for consideration or debate raise an issue
8a : to increase the strength, intensity, or pitch of don't raise your voice
b : to increase the degree of
c : to cause to rise in level or amount raise the rent
d(1) : to increase the amount of (a poker bet)
(2) : to bet more than (a previous bettor)
e(1) : to make a higher bridge bid in (a partner's suit)
(2) : to increase the bid of (one's partner)
9 : to make light and porous raise dough
10 : to cause to ascend raise the dust
11 : to multiply (a quantity) by itself a specified number of times raise two to the fourth power
12 : to bring in sight on the horizon by approaching raise land
13a : to bring up the nap of (cloth)
b : to cause (something, such as a blister) to form on the skin
14 : to increase the nominal value of fraudulently raise a check
15 : to articulate (a sound) with the tongue in a higher position
16 : to establish radio communication with

intransitive verb

1 dialect : rise
2 : to increase a bet or bid
raise Cain or raise hell
1 : to act wildly : create a disturbance
2 : to scold or upbraid someone especially loudly raised hell with the umpire
raise eyebrows
: to cause surprise or mild disapproval
raise the bar
: to set a higher standard new software that raises the bar for competitors

raise

noun

Definition of raise (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an act of raising or lifting
2 : a rising stretch of road : an upward grade : rise
3 : an increase in amount: such as
a : an increase of a bet or bid
b : an increase in wages or salary
4 : a vertical or inclined opening or passageway connecting one mine working area with another at a higher level

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Other Words from raise

Verb

raiser noun

Choose the Right Synonym for raise

Verb

lift, raise, rear, elevate, hoist, heave, boost mean to move from a lower to a higher place or position. lift usually implies exerting effort to overcome resistance of weight. lift the chair while I vacuum raise carries a stronger implication of bringing up to the vertical or to a high position. scouts raising a flagpole rear may add an element of suddenness to raise. suddenly reared itself up on its hind legs elevate may replace lift or raise especially when exalting or enhancing is implied. elevated the taste of the public hoist implies lifting something heavy especially by mechanical means. hoisted the cargo on board heave implies lifting and throwing with great effort or strain. heaved the heavy crate inside boost suggests assisting to climb or advance by a push. boosted his brother over the fence

Examples of raise in a Sentence

Verb

Raise your hand if you know the answer. Raise your arms above your head. He raised his head and looked around. She raised her eyes from her book and stared at him. He raised the cup to his lips and drank. I raised the lid and peeked inside. Let's raise the windows and get some fresh air in here. We raised the flag to the top of the pole. I carefully raised her to a sitting position. She raised herself onto her knees.

Noun

the school board approved a raise in the maximum family income for students qualifying for reduced-price lunches
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Whether that raises Nintendo's notoriously litigious legal eyebrows remains to be seen. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "You can now download the long-lost (and unfinished) SimCity NES port," 26 Dec. 2018 There are a few possibilities that scientists have already raised, but none of them are particularly compelling. Avery Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "Something Weird Is Going on With New Horizons' Next Target," 21 Dec. 2018 The game was funded by fans via Kickstarter, raising over $900,000. Amanda Mitchell, Marie Claire, "Chrissy Teigen Loves Shantae: Half-Genie Hero, But What Exactly Is It?," 21 Dec. 2018 In a mirror of the original show, DJ enlists Stephanie, along with her best friend Kimmy (Andrea Barber) to live with her and help raise her children. Emma Dibdin, Country Living, "All About Hallmark Star Jodie Sweetin's Difficult Journey to Find Love After Divorce," 15 Dec. 2018 Tennessee License Plate Born and raised in Franklin, Tennessee, Miley makes a small nod to her home state with her car's license plate. Tamara Fuentes, Seventeen, "13 Hidden Easter Eggs in Miley Cyrus' New 'Nothing Breaks Like a Heart' Music Video That’ll Give You Chills," 30 Nov. 2018 Under Obama, the U.S. Interior Department was considering raising those royalty rates to offset the effects of climate change from burning coal. Matthew Brown, The Seattle Times, "States ask court to stop Trump from reviving US coal sales," 12 Dec. 2018 The following November, Calabria had moved on to actively urging that the Fed start raising interest rates. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "Trump keeps complaining about the Fed while appointing people who don’t agree with his complaints," 12 Dec. 2018 The theory: As the Fed continues to raise rates, parking cash in money-market funds and other similar ultrashort and ultrasafe vehicles could earn investors as much as 3%. Suzanne Mcgee, WSJ, "Where to Put Your Money in 2019," 9 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

For seasons 11 and 12, it was reported by Deadline that Kaley, Jim, Johnny, Simon, and Kunal each took a pay cut of $100,000 an episode in order to give Mayim Bialik and Melissa Rauch a pay raise. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "How Kaley Cuoco Became One of the Highest-Paid Women on TV," 23 Aug. 2018 And now the police union is clamoring for a hefty raise for these officers? Fabiola Santiago, miamiherald, "Want a big raise, BSO cops? Next school shooting, act with competence, not cowardice. | Miami Herald," 26 Apr. 2018 Women came into the company paid less than men, then they are ranked more harshly and, as a result, got smaller raises and bonuses. Christopher Carbone, Fox News, "Nike hit with gender discrimination lawsuit," 12 Aug. 2018 Milbank lawyers in their first eight years of practice will get raises of between 4.8% and 6.4% this year. Sara Randazzo, WSJ, "Starting Law Firm Associate Salaries Hit $190,000," 12 June 2018 While total spending will be lower than 2018 and the employees will be getting raises, there will be no reduction in services, Town Administrator Jesse Bane said. Allan Vought, The Aegis, "Bel Air's final budget set at $16.6 million, tax rates unchanged," 25 May 2018 Those with a college degree have gotten bigger raises in recent years than those without one. NBC News, "Meet the Press -May 20, 2018," 20 May 2018 So far under his leadership, here's what the district has done: For the first time in years, nearly all employees are getting raises. Lori Higgins, Detroit Free Press, "Vitti's 1st year: Amid challenges, his promise is still to serve schools' kids," 18 May 2018 Two other players got big raises with new contracts. Jonathan Tannenwald, Philly.com, "MLS player salaries 2018: How do the Union compare to the rest of the league?," 10 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'raise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of raise

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1538, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for raise

Verb

Middle English reisen, raisen, from Old Norse reisa — more at rear

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Statistics for raise

Last Updated

29 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for raise

The first known use of raise was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for raise

raise

verb

English Language Learners Definition of raise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to lift or move (something or someone) to a higher position

: to lift or move (something or someone) to a standing or more upright position

: to increase the amount or level of (something)

raise

noun

English Language Learners Definition of raise (Entry 2 of 2)

: an increase in the amount of your pay

raise

verb
\ ˈrāz \
raised; raising

Kids Definition of raise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to cause to rise : lift Please raise your hand.
2 : collect sense 1 The school is trying to raise money.
3 : to look after the growth and development of : grow The farmer raised hogs.
4 : to bring up a child : rear He was raised by his grandmother.
5 : to bring to notice No one raised any objection.
6 : increase entry 1 They're raising the rent.
7 : to make louder Don't raise your voice.
8 : to give life to : arouse The children made enough noise to raise the dead.
9 : to set upright by lifting or building A monument was raised.
10 : promote sense 1, elevate She was raised to captain.
11 : to give rise to : provoke The joke raised a laugh.
12 : to make light and airy Yeast can raise dough.
13 : to cause to form on the skin The burn raised a blister.

Other Words from raise

raiser noun

raise

noun

Kids Definition of raise (Entry 2 of 2)

: an increase in amount (as of pay)

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More from Merriam-Webster on raise

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for raise

Spanish Central: Translation of raise

Nglish: Translation of raise for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of raise for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about raise

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