craze

verb
\ ˈkrāz \
crazed; crazing

Definition of craze 

(Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 obsolete : break, shatter

2 : to produce minute cracks on the surface or glaze of crazed glass crazed pottery

3 : to make insane or as if insane crazed by pain and fear crazed addicts

intransitive verb

1 archaic : shatter, break

2 : to become insane

3 : to develop a mesh of fine cracks

craze

noun

Definition of craze (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an exaggerated and often transient enthusiasm : mania the latest craze in music

2 : a crack in a surface or coating (as of glaze or enamel)

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Choose the Right Synonym for craze

Noun

fashion, style, mode, vogue, fad, rage, craze mean the usage accepted by those who want to be up-to-date. fashion is the most general term and applies to any way of dressing, behaving, writing, or performing that is favored at any one time or place. the current fashion style often implies a distinctive fashion adopted by people of taste. a media baron used to traveling in style mode suggests the fashion of the moment among those anxious to appear elegant and sophisticated. slim bodies are the mode at this resort vogue stresses the wide acceptance of a fashion. short skirts are back in vogue fad suggests caprice in taking up or in dropping a fashion. last year's fad is over rage and craze stress intense enthusiasm in adopting a fad. Cajun food was the rage nearly everywhere for a time crossword puzzles once seemed just a passing craze but have lasted

Examples of craze in a Sentence

Verb

soldiers who had been crazed by months of combat and chaos in the countryside

Noun

if history is any guide, this latest diet for losing weight is just another craze

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Robert Mann, an airline consultant and former American Airlines executive, said windows are periodically polished to remove crazing, the formation of tiny cracks in the acrylic windows from exposure to chemicals and the sun’s rays. Mark Gillispie And David Koenig, BostonGlobe.com, "Southwest plane with cracked window diverted to Cleveland," 2 May 2018 Becker then built a stout wire fence around his reservation and lived in peace until last week when a killer whale, or orca, arrived and so harried the sea lions that, crazed with fright, the lions smashed down his fence and swarmed his lighthouse. Johnny Miller, San Francisco Chronicle, "Reporter Randy Shilts announces he has AIDS, 1993," 7 Feb. 2018 While the other characters explore romance and sexuality, Jamal explores desperation, getting increasingly crazed by the episode. Rebecca Farley, refinery29.com, "Rolling Deep With The On My Block RollerWorld Conspiracy," 28 Mar. 2018 Lesser clay bricks that might be used for construction of walls often craze and crumble after several winters in contact with soil. Courtney Ortega, star-telegram, "Great garden-path options to ponder," 1 Nov. 2017 In a nation as soccer-crazed yet World Cup-deprived as Peru has been, this is an absolutely massive deal. Daniel Rapaport, SI.com, "Peru's President Told Public Workers to Leave Work at 4 PM to Watch Crucial World Cup Qualifier," 10 Oct. 2017 Her face bursts into a grin at once crazed and innocent. Sarah Miller, The Cut, "I Think About This a Lot: The Cat Refrigerator Scene in The Secret Life of Pets," 2 Oct. 2017 My only thought on the motivational trash can craze sweeping the Brian Stultz, ajc, "LOOK: Texas A&M copies Tennessee with its own turnover trash can," 16 Sep. 2017 Then as now, Valdez and other small Alaska towns were basketball-crazed. Yereth Rosen, Alaska Dispatch News, "The big quake: New book explains how 1964 reshaped Alaska and the scientific world," 3 Sep. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The video, diving into the phonic craze, represented a rarity for the Trump White House, a jokey parody perhaps targeted at social media that did not delve deeply into anything overtly political. Eli Rosenberg, Washington Post, "Kellyanne Conway hears ‘Laurel’ but says she’s willing to tell others ‘Yanny’ in White House video," 17 May 2018 But Juul has become a controversial investment because vaping is a popular activity among teenagers, sparking a craze in many high schools. Bloomberg, latimes.com, "E-cigarette maker Juul is said to seek $1.2 billion in funding," 29 June 2018 Powered not just by electricity, but by volleys of venture money, e-scooters are the latest craze coming out of California. The Economist, "How two-wheelers are weaving their way into urban transport," 21 June 2018 In reality, Fortnite is not that different from past youth-centric cultural crazes, from Minecraft to Donkey Kong to Atari to pinball machines. Alex Salkever, Fortune, "Fortnite Is Poised to Rule the Summer. Are Parents Prepared?," 5 July 2018 That sudden rise in crypto created a mad dash by consumers who wanted in on the craze, and some shady businesses were trying to capitalize by promoting scams, hence the ban by Facebook. Kurt Wagner, Recode, "Facebook is reversing its ban on cryptocurrency ads," 26 June 2018 Watson and Brown join other duos who were hit by the dance craze, including Ciara and Russell Wilson and Valeisha Butterfield and Dahntay Jones. Essence.com, "The Quick Read: Another Woman Comes Forward Accusing Russell Simmons Of Rape," 11 July 2018 The Washington Post recently touched on the camel milk craze in its food and cooking blog, Voraciously, noting that U.S. camel milk farms are fairly small and uncommon. Justin L. Mack, Indianapolis Star, "Camel milk is the hot new trend and there is a farm right here in Indiana," 21 June 2018 The initial craze over personalized clothing boxes focused primarily on the market surrounding cisgender women. Makena Kelly, The Verge, "Amazon’s clothing try-on service opens up to all Prime subscribers today," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'craze.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of craze

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1812, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for craze

Verb

Middle English crasen to crush, craze, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish krasa to crush

Noun

see craze entry 1

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Statistics for craze

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Time Traveler for craze

The first known use of craze was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for craze

craze

noun

English Language Learners Definition of craze

: something that is very popular for a period of time

craze

noun
\ ˈkrāz \

Kids Definition of craze

: something that is very popular for a short while

craze

verb
\ ˈkrāz \
crazed; crazing

Medical Definition of craze 

transitive verb

: to make insane or as if insane crazed by pain and fear

intransitive verb

: to become insane

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