rage

noun
\ ˈrāj How to pronounce rage (audio) \

Definition of rage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : violent and uncontrolled anger
b : a fit of violent wrath
c archaic : insanity
2 : violent action (as of wind or sea)
3 : an intense feeling : passion
4 : a fad pursued with intense enthusiasm was all the rage

rage

verb
raged; raging

Definition of rage (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to be in a rage
2 : to be in tumult
3 : to prevail uncontrollably

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Choose the Right Synonym for rage

Noun

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

fashion, style, mode, vogue, fad, rage, craze mean the usage accepted by those who want to be up-to-date. fashion is the most general term and applies to any way of dressing, behaving, writing, or performing that is favored at any one time or place. the current fashion style often implies a distinctive fashion adopted by people of taste. a media baron used to traveling in style mode suggests the fashion of the moment among those anxious to appear elegant and sophisticated. slim bodies are the mode at this resort vogue stresses the wide acceptance of a fashion. short skirts are back in vogue fad suggests caprice in taking up or in dropping a fashion. last year's fad is over rage and craze stress intense enthusiasm in adopting a fad. Cajun food was the rage nearly everywhere for a time crossword puzzles once seemed just a passing craze but have lasted

Examples of rage in a Sentence

Noun Her note to him was full of rage. He was shaking with rage. She was seized by a murderous rage. His rages rarely last more than a few minutes. Verb She raged about the injustice of their decision. The manager raged at the umpire. A storm was raging outside, but we were warm and comfortable indoors. The fire raged for hours.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Throughout the Wednesday assault, there were signs of rage directed at journalists. Brittany Shammas, Anchorage Daily News, "Journalists were attacked, threatened and detained during the Capitol siege," 10 Jan. 2021 The conversations were public, easily observable, and egged on by the president, who often engaged with them directly, and whose political career has been defined by whipping up paranoia and rage on the internet. Kaitlyn Tiffany, The Atlantic, "Trump’s Tweets Were Never Just Tweets," 7 Jan. 2021 Trump’s rage is unlikely to go away when Jan. 21 arrives, either. Philip Elliott, Time, "Why Republican Lawmakers Are Dividing Into Two Camps Over Election Reality," 5 Jan. 2021 The other big part of the episode is about Robbie’s rage. Brian Moylan, Vulture, "Cobra Kai Recap: Tournament of Lies," 4 Jan. 2021 Clemson is somewhat new to the conversation, but the cheesy one-liners and arrogance ignited a rage to my core. Doug Lesmerises, cleveland, "Dabo Swinney is the villain that Jim Harbaugh should be: Ranking the coaches that annoy Ohio State fans the most," 30 Dec. 2020 The collective rage directed this year at the likes of Garcetti and his New York counterpart, de Blasio, stemmed at least in part from their aspirations to ascend the very office to which voters elected them. Jennifer Swann, The New Republic, "The Year When Everyone Bullied Their Mayor," 28 Dec. 2020 As the coronavirus pandemic was just beginning to rage in March, and stay-home orders were coming down from Whitmer, all Christine McCalebb wanted to do was relax in her yard with her family around a bonfire. Freep.com, "Free Press stories a driver of change in Michigan," 27 Dec. 2020 And so that rage felt much more internalized and much less prone to violence. Los Angeles Times, "‘Promising Young Woman’ isn’t asking for your approval. But it’ll keep you talking," 24 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The president’s decision to sign the bill caps days of uncertainty and confusion in Washington as the coronavirus pandemic continued to rage in the U.S., with experts raising concerns about increasing hospitalizations in many parts of the country. Natalie Andrews, WSJ, "Trump Signs Covid-19 Aid Bill Averting Government Shutdown," 28 Dec. 2020 As the pandemic continued to rage on, Hernandez had a new business idea. Andrea Kramar, USA TODAY, "How this California small-business owner came up with creative ways to help community during pandemic," 14 Dec. 2020 Clashes in front of the Justice Center continued to rage as others slowly began to fan out deeper into downtown. Adam Ferrise, cleveland, "9 hours of violence: Peaceful protest on May 30 turned to chaos as police tried to keep up," 3 Dec. 2020 The pandemic continued to rage on and earlier this month, parts of the midwest started becoming overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients. Caitlin O'kane, CBS News, "New Orleans nurses return favor to Kansas City nurses who helped them during COVID-19 surge," 30 Nov. 2020 The debate over reopening schools has continued to rage along with the spread of COVID-19 around the U.S., with the CDC offering shifting guidance over the past few months. Billy Kobin, The Courier-Journal, "Private Louisville school will ignore Beshear's order on in-person classes, official says," 20 Nov. 2020 October marked the mass return of Texas high school athletics, even as COVID-19 continued to rage across the state. ExpressNews.com, "Express Briefing: Video of Schertz police using Taser on teen prompts investigation," 5 Nov. 2020 For people in the Middle East, his presidency is associated with the conflicts that began in Yemen, Libya and Syria, and continued to rage in Iraq during his tenure. Tamara Qiblawi, CNN, "What a Trump or a Biden win would mean for the Middle East," 1 Nov. 2020 The product was ready, and the pandemic was starting to rage. Neil Senturia, San Diego Union-Tribune, "The rise and fall of Quibi and what entrepreneurs can learn from its demise," 23 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for rage

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin rabia, from Latin rabies rage, madness, from rabere to be mad; akin to Sanskrit rabhas violence

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Time Traveler for rage

Time Traveler

The first known use of rage was in the 14th century

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Statistics for rage

Last Updated

16 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Rage.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rage. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for rage

rage

noun
How to pronounce rage (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of rage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a strong feeling of anger that is difficult to control
: a sudden expression of violent anger
: something that is suddenly very popular

rage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of rage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to talk in an extremely angry way : to shout loudly and angrily
: to happen or continue in a destructive, violent, or intense way

rage

noun
\ ˈrāj How to pronounce rage (audio) \

Kids Definition of rage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : very strong and uncontrolled anger : fury I was filled with rage.
2 : a fit of anger The rude remark sent him into a rage.
3 : violent action (as of wind or sea)
4 : fad

rage

verb
raged; raging

Kids Definition of rage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to feel or show extreme or uncontrolled anger
2 : to continue out of control The fire raged for hours.

rage

noun
\ ˈrāj How to pronounce rage (audio) \

Medical Definition of rage

: violent and uncontrolled anger

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Comments on rage

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