fury

noun
fu·​ry | \ ˈfyu̇r-ē How to pronounce fury (audio) , ˈfyər-\
plural furies

Definition of fury

1 : intense, disordered, and often destructive rage
2a capitalized : any of the avenging deities in Greek mythology who torment criminals and inflict plagues
b : an avenging spirit
c : one who resembles an avenging spirit especially : a spiteful woman
3 : extreme fierceness or violence
4 : a state of inspired exaltation : frenzy

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Choose the Right Synonym for fury

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Dire Straits and Furies

Dire and fury share a history in Roman mythology, as each of these words is connected to the Erinyes, the avenging and terrifying deities of ancient myth who tormented criminals. The Romans referred to these goddesses as either the Dirae or the Furiae. The former is from the Latin word dirus, from which dire is descended, and the latter comes from furere, from where we get fury. The word dire is often found in conjunction with straits; in dire straits is used of a situation that is very bad or difficult. Our records indicate that this phrase began to be used in English at the end of the 18th century, when it appeared in Francis Fawkes’s The Argonautics of Apollonius Rhodius: “When now the heroes through the vast profound, Reach the dire straits with rocks encompass’d round.”

Examples of fury in a Sentence

I could see the fury in her eyes. Nothing could contain his fury over their accusations. He turned away from them in fury. The hurricane unleashed its fury on hundreds of homes and businesses.
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Recent Examples on the Web

And nearly every year, the rains come with a fury that destroys public infrastructure and croplands, displaces millions of residents and, in extreme cases, has a huge human toll. Manavi Kapur, Quartz India, "In photos: Assam, Bihar, and Mumbai reel under the fury of the great Indian monsoon," 18 July 2019 The play is never more electrifying than when Schreck’s charisma curdles into fury over how the entire American legal framework has rendered women’s lives worthless. Naureen Khan, The Atlantic, "The Tony-Nominated Play That Savages the U.S. Constitution," 8 June 2019 May curses blast thee; and in thee the breed Which forces, which compels, a world to bleed; May that destruction, which ’tis thine to spread, Descend with ten-fold fury on thy head. Eric Powell, The New York Review of Books, "Shelley’s Anti-Boney Fides," 6 June 2019 Mideast peace talks have been stalled for years because of Israeli anger over unrelenting attacks by Palestinians and Palestinian fury over Israel's often violent control of the West Bank. Kim Hjelmgaard, USA TODAY, "Trump demands Palestinian 'respect' to receive U.S. aid," 25 Jan. 2018 On one such occasion, triggered by a random event, my father flew into a blind rage and unleashed his fury on our male attendant. Vikram Zutshi, Quartz India, "Why do abusive men (and the women who support them) behave the way they do?," 19 July 2019 There's another reason all this sound and fury might not mean very much. Andrew Moseman, Popular Mechanics, "Why a Judge Ruled the Males-Only Military Draft Unconstitutional," 25 Feb. 2019 After all the sound and fury, what has the Heat gained? Ira Winderman, sun-sentinel.com, "ASK IRA: Is DeMarcus Cousins a viable play for the Heat?," 3 July 2019 The fastest way to get the fire and fury of the U.S. military unleashed on you is to interfere with the freedom of navigation on the open seas and in the air. Camilo Montoya-galvez, CBS News, "Tom Cotton calls for "retaliatory military strike" on Iran over oil tanker attacks," 16 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fury.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fury

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fury

Middle English furie, from Latin furia, from furere to rage

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Dictionary Entries near fury

Furtwängler

furuncle

furunculosis

fury

furyl

furze

furzechat

Statistics for fury

Last Updated

12 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for fury

The first known use of fury was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for fury

fury

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fury

: violent anger
: wild and dangerous force

fury

noun
fu·​ry | \ ˈfyu̇r-ē How to pronounce fury (audio) \
plural furies

Kids Definition of fury

1 : violent anger : rage
2 : wild and dangerous force the fury of the storm

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More from Merriam-Webster on fury

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fury

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fury

Spanish Central: Translation of fury

Nglish: Translation of fury for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fury for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about fury

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