fury

noun
fu·​ry | \ ˈfyu̇r-ē How to pronounce fury (audio) , ˈfyər-\
plural furies

Definition of fury

1 : intense, disordered, and often destructive rage
2a capitalized : any of the avenging deities in Greek mythology who torment criminals and inflict plagues
b : an avenging spirit
c : one who resembles an avenging spirit especially : a spiteful woman
3 : extreme fierceness or violence
4 : a state of inspired exaltation : frenzy

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Choose the Right Synonym for fury

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Dire Straits and Furies

Dire and fury share a history in Roman mythology, as each of these words is connected to the Erinyes, the avenging and terrifying deities of ancient myth who tormented criminals. The Romans referred to these goddesses as either the Dirae or the Furiae. The former is from the Latin word dirus, from which dire is descended, and the latter comes from furere, from where we get fury. The word dire is often found in conjunction with straits; in dire straits is used of a situation that is very bad or difficult. Our records indicate that this phrase began to be used in English at the end of the 18th century, when it appeared in Francis Fawkes’s The Argonautics of Apollonius Rhodius: “When now the heroes through the vast profound, Reach the dire straits with rocks encompass’d round.”

Examples of fury in a Sentence

I could see the fury in her eyes. Nothing could contain his fury over their accusations. He turned away from them in fury. The hurricane unleashed its fury on hundreds of homes and businesses.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The 94-72 deficit quickly became 94-92 when Gillian Sullivan (Barbwire Gordon) charged out of the pack and unleashed a fury of point power. Rick Menning, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Gold Coast Derby Grrls double their dynamics in super skatefest," 23 Apr. 2018 Hell hath no fury like a New Yorker on the way to work in the morning. Brooke Bobb, Vogue, "In New York City, Where Style and Hustle Rule, This Is What Democracy Looks Like," 6 Nov. 2018 And the last ten minutes offer up a twist that had the entire theater erupting in a fury of obscenities. Ineye Komonibo, Marie Claire, "I Saw 'Us' and I Will Never Know Peace Again," 25 Mar. 2019 All that remains is to discover the reasons, the rationalizations, the engraved moments of fury and terror and passion that brought us from there to here. Laura Hudson, The Verge, "Why Return of the Obra Dinn is my game of the year," 21 Dec. 2018 As unemployment rises, household income would fall — two key triggers that contributed to public fury and revolts in other Arab countries nearly eight years ago. Aya Batrawy, The Seattle Times, "Saudi prince’s future put to the test at investment forum," 22 Oct. 2018 Those sentiments were also expressed by screenwriting guru Robert McKee, who sees Mildred’s arc as a new twist on Medea, known in legend as the woman who killed out of fury and spite — an action Mildred contemplates at the end of the movie. Gary Thompson, Philly.com, "Think these movies are too gory? The Greek myths they're based on are worse," 12 July 2018 After Wormley allows himself to be seduced by the old poet, repugnance turns to fury and finally, wrenchingly, to love. Mark Swed, latimes.com, "Walt Whitman's operatic America in 'Crossing' gets its West Coast premiere," 27 May 2018 The song is a gripping torrent of fury and resentment, levelled at a cheating lover—and the other woman—but bolstered by moments of sideways levity. Gary Shteyngart, The New Yorker, "Cardi B’s “Invasion of Privacy” Is as Studious as It Is Bombastic," 27 Sep. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fury.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fury

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fury

Middle English furie, from Latin furia, from furere to rage

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Dictionary Entries near fury

Furtwängler

furuncle

furunculosis

fury

furyl

furze

furzechat

Statistics for fury

Last Updated

6 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for fury

The first known use of fury was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for fury

fury

noun

English Language Learners Definition of fury

: violent anger
: wild and dangerous force

fury

noun
fu·​ry | \ ˈfyu̇r-ē How to pronounce fury (audio) \
plural furies

Kids Definition of fury

1 : violent anger : rage
2 : wild and dangerous force the fury of the storm

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More from Merriam-Webster on fury

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with fury

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fury

Spanish Central: Translation of fury

Nglish: Translation of fury for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fury for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about fury

Comments on fury

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