anger

noun
an·​ger | \ˈaŋ-gər \

Definition of anger 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of displeasure and usually of antagonism (see antagonism sense 1b) You could hear the anger in his voice. She found it hard to control her anger.

anger

verb
angered; angering\ -​g(ə-​)riŋ \

Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to make (someone) angry He was angered by the decision.

intransitive verb

: to become angry a man who angers easily

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Other Words from anger

Noun

angerless \ -​ləs \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for anger

Synonyms: Noun

angriness, birse [chiefly Scottish], choler, furor, fury, indignation, irateness, ire, lividity, lividness, mad, madness, mood [archaic], outrage, rage, spleen, wrath, wrathfulness

Synonyms: Verb

enrage, incense, inflame (also enflame), infuriate, ire, mad, madden, outrage, rankle, rile, roil, steam up, tick off

Antonyms: Noun

delight, pleasure

Antonyms: Verb

delight, gratify, please

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Choose the Right Synonym for anger

Noun

anger, ire, rage, fury, indignation, wrath mean an intense emotional state induced by displeasure. anger, the most general term, names the reaction but by itself does not convey cause or intensity. tried to hide his anger ire, more frequent in literary contexts, suggests an intense anger, often with an evident display of feeling. cheeks flushed with ire rage and fury suggest loss of self-control from violence of emotion. shook with rage could not contain his fury indignation stresses righteous anger at what one considers unfair, mean, or shameful. a comment that caused general indignation wrath is likely to suggest a desire or intent to punish or get revenge. I feared her wrath if I was discovered

Noun

anger, rage, and fury mean the feelings brought about by great displeasure. anger can be used of either a strong or a mild feeling. I was able to hide my anger. rage is used of strong violent feeling that is difficult to control. He was screaming with rage. fury is used of overwhelming rage that may cause a person to become violent. In their fury the people smashed windows.

Examples of anger in a Sentence

Noun

He couldn't hide his anger with us. You could hear the anger in his voice. The group expressed its anger over the company's arrogance. He said that he had no anger towards the person who shot him. He never raised his voice in anger. She was shaking in anger.

Verb

They were shocked and angered by the company's arrogance. He was angered to learn that he had been fired. It angered me that she would say something like that. He's a gentle man who's not easily angered.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Swim Ink 2/Corbis via Getty Images The populist anger at the heart of modern anti-Semitism may not be new. Tara Isabella Burton, Vox, "The centuries-old history of Jewish “puppet master” conspiracy theories," 2 Nov. 2018 It’s also why the picture of Kavanaugh at his confirmation hearings—his anger, his narcissism, his solipsism—was so familiar to us, as well. Jason Zengerle, Town & Country, "Brett Kavanaugh and the Private School Pecking Order," 16 Oct. 2018 This anger has been building for two years since Donald Trump was elected. Fox News, "McConnell on marshalling the votes to confirm Kavanaugh," 7 Oct. 2018 Righteous anger is the stuff of progress, while bitterness is fuel for stagnation and disease. Megan Feldman Bettencourt, Harper's BAZAAR, "How Forgiveness Has Been Weaponized Against Women," 25 Sep. 2018 The anger was palpable and about being tired of the violence and corruption that’s the only reality of Mexico the world sees. Elaine Ayala, San Antonio Express-News, "San Antonian’s front seat at Mexico’s historic presidential election," 8 July 2018 But anger at Trump’s family separations was still raw in Archer Park, a grassy oasis in the middle of McAllen. Kevin Sullivan, star-telegram, "In this Texas border town, immigration isn’t a problem — it’s a way of life," 7 July 2018 The anger provoked by the production had been visceral and swift as artists of all stripes asked why Mr. Lepage hadn’t bothered to hire more black actors and singers. Dan Bilefsky, New York Times, "Protests Shutter a Show That Cast White Singers as Black Slaves," 4 July 2018 But anger at Trump’s family separations was still raw in Archer Park, a grassy oasis in the middle of McAllen. Kevin Sullivan, Washington Post, "‘An all-American city that speaks Spanish’: Welcome to the Texas border town at the center of the immigration fight," 4 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Republicans are most angered by undocumented immigrants crossing the border and by calls to impeach Trump, according to a survey conducted by Reuters and Ipsos gauging emotional response toward the biggest headlines this month. Emily Stewart, Vox, "Fox News, NBC, and Facebook pulled Trump’s racist campaign ad. He’s not happy about it.," 5 Nov. 2018 Supporters of the ban have been angered by the state government’s decision not to seek a review of the Supreme Court’s ruling. Ashok Sharma, The Seattle Times, "Indian temple set to allow entry to females who menstruate," 17 Oct. 2018 Some are frustrating, angering and, frankly, incomprehensible. Shannon Tompkins, Houston Chronicle, "Boat ramps a gateway to fun or frustration," 28 June 2018 Microsoft appears terrified of changing anything and angering anyone. David Pierce, WSJ, "Microsoft Is Fixing Office, but Not Fast Enough," 17 June 2018 Millions have bailed on the NFL, angered that some NFL players chose to kneel during the National Anthem. Roy Bragg, San Antonio Express-News, "The XFL: Another failed league for SA? Or a chance to honor America?," 7 June 2018 Gaining the approval of one neighborhood can anger another. James Vaznis, BostonGlobe.com, "Next Boston superintendent will face a massive to-do list," 27 June 2018 The name alone would anger officials of the People's Republic of China. David Mckenzie And Brent Swails, CNN, "The kingdom that China just can't flip," 8 June 2018 Villaraigosa was hoping to mobilize Latino voters worried or angered about those policies. Joe Garofoli, San Francisco Chronicle, "Gavin Newsom, John Cox to face off in fall CA governor’s race," 5 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'anger.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of anger

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for anger

Noun

Middle English, affliction, anger, from Old Norse angr grief; akin to Old English enge narrow, Latin angere to strangle, Greek anchein

Verb

see anger entry 1

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Statistics for anger

Last Updated

16 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for anger

The first known use of anger was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for anger

anger

verb

English Language Learners Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make (someone) angry

anger

noun

English Language Learners Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of being upset or annoyed because of something wrong or bad : the feeling that makes someone want to hurt other people, to shout, etc. : the feeling of being angry

anger

verb
an·​ger | \ˈaŋ-gər \
angered; angering

Kids Definition of anger

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make strongly displeased : make angry

anger

noun

Kids Definition of anger (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of displeasure or annoyance and often of active opposition to an insult, injury, or injustice

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Comments on anger

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