outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue. Verb His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The idea of the protests started with a tweet from a Melbourne woman, Janine Hendry, who suggested that a group of women meet outside Parliament House on Monday to express their outrage. NBC News, "As rape allegations rock Australia's Parliament, thousands of women say enough is enough," 15 Mar. 2021 London's mayor demanded an explanation and politicians from the left and right expressed their outrage at the disproportionate use of force, some even requesting the head of the Met, herself a woman, resign. Nina Dos Santos, CNN, "Crowd shouts 'Shame on you' as London police break up a peaceful vigil for Sarah Everard," 13 Mar. 2021 His outrage hasn't extended to the state's Public Utility Commission, which oversees ERCOT and is led by Abbott appointees. CBS News, "Texas power grid CEO Bill Magness getting fired in wake of deadly blackouts," 4 Mar. 2021 Trump retaliated the next day, broadcasting his outrage and derision for McConnell in a statement released by the Save America PAC. Washington Post, "Trump called McConnell a ‘hack.’ But McConnell says he would ‘absolutely’ back him if he wins 2024 nomination.," 26 Feb. 2021 Punishing workers for using weed touched off an outrage cycle among the public as well as members of Congress and at least one top former Obama Administration official. Chris Roberts, Forbes, "Biden White House Admits Firing Staffers For Marijuana, But Still Employs Some Past Pot Users," 19 Mar. 2021 Long’s statements spurred outrage and widespread skepticism in the Asian American community, which has increasingly been targeted for violence during the coronavirus pandemic. Jeff Amy And Kate Brumback, chicagotribune.com, "Atlanta spa shootings: Victims ID’d as Biden, Harris to meet with Asian American community leaders," 19 Mar. 2021 Will the outrage fueling the Newsom recall subside along with the pandemic? Michael Smolens Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: With pandemic on the run, Newsom’s odds of defeating recall improve," 19 Mar. 2021 Long’s statements spurred outrage and widespread skepticism in the Asian American community, which has increasingly been targeted for violence during the coronavirus pandemic. BostonGlobe.com, "Spa shooting victims identified as Biden, Harris head to Atlanta," 19 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Collins responded Saturday to outrage over the tweets, saying her words had been were misunderstood. Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle, "What split on S.F. school board over racist tweets means for the district: 'Crisis of governance'," 22 Mar. 2021 This is a fun way to outrage your pointing-dog friends. Alex Robinson, Outdoor Life, "How to Kill Pheasants with Your Wild-Ass Retriever," 4 Dec. 2020 Those are the kinds of facts that will outrage the public. Sy Mukherjee, Fortune, "Bristol Myers Squibb and Celgene got a beating in Congress on drug prices—but only Congress can fix the problem," 1 Oct. 2020 The mood in the country had turned from the anxious sadness surrounding covid-19 to outrage over police brutality and the killing of George Floyd. Geoff Edgers, Washington Post, "Entertainers promised to see us through the quarantine. Even they are running out of steam.," 10 July 2020 Will outrage lead to lasting change? Pushed by a left-leaning workforce, big tech now regularly takes an activist stance on important issues, from immigration to the pandemic. The Economist, "Beyond the pale Will Silicon Valley face up to its diversity problem?," 20 June 2020 Pointing to outrage in the community, Brooks again called for Sanders to resign. Sarah Fowler, USA TODAY, "Mississippi GOP condemns local official for racist comments, but he won't resign," 17 June 2020 My social media feeds are full of complaints from parents who are still restricting in-person interaction for their kids and are outraged that others are not. Lisa Selin Davis, CNN, "Playdates and the pandemic: Can kids safely meet up?," 30 May 2020 Count Machine Gun Kelly as yet another celebrity outraged after the death of George Floyd. Troy L. Smith, cleveland, "Machine Gun Kelly says ‘(expletive) the police’ in response to George Floyd’s death," 28 May 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Time Traveler for outrage

Time Traveler

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

3 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Outrage.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/outrage. Accessed 14 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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Comments on outrage

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