outrage

noun
out·rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj \

Definition of outrage 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations —Anthony West

2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers —William Shakespeare

b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity —John Buchan

3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape

b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance —John Braine

2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

Keep scrolling for more

Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun

Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue.

Verb

His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Then, a little later that month, Cantaloupe decided to go ahead and recommend charges against the teens, following the storm of public outrage. Breanna Edwards, The Root, "Teens Who Laughed at, Mocked, Failed to Help Florida Man Who Drowned Will Not Face Charges," 26 June 2018 There's also been outrage over a controversial deal between the Coastal Commission and wealthy homeowners at Hollister Ranch Beach near Santa Barbara, which is only accessible by sea. CBS News, "Locals residents and state officials battle over access to public California beach," 13 July 2018 So far, most of the anger sparked by Trump’s immigration policies — opposed by about 59 percent of Americans, according to the latest polls — has been moral outrage, and understandably so. Will Bunch, Philly.com, "Can Trump's slow-motion ethnic cleansing keep whites in U.S. majority? | Will Bunch," 12 July 2018 In Germany, as details about the murders emerged, there was widespread outrage that a neo-Nazi group could have existed for so long, carrying out violent attacks, mainly on Turkish men, without police intervention. Siobhán O'grady, Washington Post, "German court sentences woman nicknamed ‘Nazi bride’ to life in prison for role in racially motivated murders," 11 July 2018 There was outrage this year when Mr Trump made a modest tweak to tradition at one of his clubs near Aberdeen. The Economist, "How women and children might save golf in Scotland," 5 July 2018 The phone was buzzing nonstop and the 32-mile, 90-minute commute home was an outrage in itself. Carolyne Zinko, SFChronicle.com, "Outrage is everywhere — and we want to know how you’re coping," 26 June 2018 But on Monday night, with outrage over the treatment of immigrant families at the U.S. border pushing Democrats and Republicans further apart, his words felt especially pointed. Kenneth Partridge, Billboard, "U2 Brings Experience + Innocence to New York's Madison Square Garden," 26 June 2018 There has been bipartisan outrage over Trump's policy of taking children away from their parents at the border has grown in recent days as reports from the detainment camps continue to surface. Phillip M. Bailey, The Courier-Journal, "McConnell, Yarmuth back immigration fix as outrage crosses party lines," 19 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Word got out on social media, and people were outraged by how the school treated Michael. Marlisse Cepeda, Woman's Day, "School Forces Student with Down Syndrome and Autism to Remove Sports Jacket," 31 Mar. 2015 Costco members were outraged over news that the major chain is pulling the Polish dog from the menu at select stores, and many took to Twitter to vent their rage -- and maybe even try to save the beloved hot dog. Michelle Gant, Fox News, "Sam's Club offering Polish dogs in response to Costco's news," 13 July 2018 China was outraged and denounced the Nobel committee as celebrating a criminal. Washington Post, "Nobel widow’s release is short-lived human rights triumph," 13 July 2018 People around the country were outraged when word spread about the after-school feeding. Katy Moeller, idahostatesman, "Idaho teacher accused of animal cruelty pleads not guilty at court appearance Tuesday," 10 July 2018 Deep dives and late takes California Democrats are outraged over the Trump administration’s separation of migrant children from their parents. Joe Garofoli, SFChronicle.com, "What transgender legislator Danica Roem learned from Metallica," 19 June 2018 Across their political spectrum, Canadians were outraged. Rob Gillies And David Crary, Houston Chronicle, "Canada-US relations at a low after Trudeau-Trump trade tiff," 17 June 2018 Last year, residents near Grenfell Tower in London were outraged that visitors were taking selfies at the site of the deadly fire. Gianluca Mezzofiore, CNN, "A selfie taken against backdrop of injured woman causes backlash," 5 June 2018 When her campaign wooed Republican voters by circulating an endorsement letter from George Shultz, a former secretary of state under Ronald Reagan, many left-wing activists were outraged. The Economist, "Can a new mayor fix San Francisco’s housing and homelessness problems?," 31 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

Verb

see outrage entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about outrage

Dictionary Entries near outrage

output

output shaft

outrace

outrage

outrageous

outrager

outrance

Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

24 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outrage

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong

: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act

2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.

2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj \

Legal Definition of outrage 

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act

2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on outrage

What made you want to look up outrage? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

an open space surrounded by woods

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Food Quiz

Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!