outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

affront, barb, brickbat, cut, dart, dig, dis (also diss) [slang], epithet, gird, indignity, insult, name, offense (or offence), personality, poke, put-down, sarcasm, slap, slight, slur

Synonyms: Verb

affront, dis (also diss) [slang], disrespect, insult, offend, slap, slight, wound

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun

Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue.

Verb

His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

While the new artist sparked outrage amongst fans, her coach was quick to defend her with a passionate speech. Kelly O'sullivan, Country Living, "Kelly Clarkson Shocked Fans by Singing With a Controversial 'Voice' Star at Her Concert," 28 Jan. 2019 Hillary feigns outrage over Trump’s locker room trash talk. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "Why Conservative Women Are Ok with Harassment," 26 Sep. 2018 The subsequent case sparked national outrage when the survivor published her court statement in full on BuzzFeed. Irene Hsu, The New Republic, "The judge in the Brock Turner case has been recalled.," 6 June 2018 That decision sparked outrage among family members, friends and other community members on social media, The Salt Lake City Tribune wrote. Josh Magness, kansascity, "Cops use stun gun on aggressive German Shepherd, video shows. Should it be euthanized? | The Kansas City Star," 19 May 2018 The trip was funded by a Holocaust memorial group, and King’s meeting with a party that has ties to neo-Nazis sparked outrage. Ella Nilsen, Vox, "Republican Rep. Steve King hangs on to his seat, but just barely," 7 Nov. 2018 Earlier this week, Megyn Kelly made comments about blackface and Halloween costumes that sparked outrage online. Megan Friedman, Good Housekeeping, "Here's Everything You Need to Know About Megyn Kelly’s NBC Exit," 26 Oct. 2018 Although the performance sparked outrage in the Brookhaven community, officials last week modulated their tone, saying Forest Hill’s students shouldn’t be punished for following the direction of their band director. Jeff Amy, The Seattle Times, "Sanctions upheld against band after questionable program," 23 Oct. 2018 At the same time, social media photos of children of the country's elite enjoying luxuries the average Iranian can't have similarly sparked outrage. Jon Gambrell, Fox News, "Iran's politicians under pressure, 40 years after revolution," 24 Sep. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Several of the women who came forward in the most recent exposé did so because they were outraged that Mr. Moonves might be so richly rewarded even in his disgraceful departure. Elizabeth Winkler, WSJ, "CBS After Moonves," 10 Sep. 2018 All pay the ultimate price for outraging this dangerous octogenarian. Tom Nolan, WSJ, "Mysteries: Tales to Warm a Cold Winter’s Night," 21 Dec. 2018 What ended up happening was, real people then join the conversation because they were outraged. Recode Staff, Recode, "How bots amplify hoaxes and propaganda on social media," 2 Aug. 2018 You can be outraged and, as a community, we should be disturbed and concerned by the comments. Emma Kate Fittes, Indianapolis Star, "Noblesville principal says he's 'appalled' by adults' reaction to teen in racist video," 23 Jan. 2018 Its scale is suggested by the degree of Trump outrages these voters have been willing to discount on behalf of a larger cultural and political cause. Daniel Henninger, WSJ, "The Right’s Resistance," 9 Jan. 2019 And perhaps at least some of them are wondering what other Trump era outrages may not be exactly as reported. *** Bottom Stories of the Day will return on Monday. James Freeman, WSJ, "The Internet Lives," 14 Dec. 2018 His steel and aluminum tariffs, most of which remain in place, outraged such allies as Canada. Greg Ip, WSJ, "Trump Didn’t Kill the Global Trade System. He Split It in Two.," 26 Dec. 2018 This rule can be stopped if all of us who were outraged on behalf of Blasey Ford submitted a comment that expressed our opposition to this regulation. Jess Davidson, Glamour, "Why Does the Department of Education Want to Put Sexual Assault Survivors on Trial?," 28 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Learn More about outrage

Dictionary Entries near outrage

output

output shaft

outrace

outrage

outrageous

outrager

outrance

Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

12 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outrage

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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More from Merriam-Webster on outrage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with outrage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for outrage

Spanish Central: Translation of outrage

Nglish: Translation of outrage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of outrage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on outrage

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