outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

affront, barb, brickbat, cut, dart, dig, dis (also diss) [slang], epithet, gird, indignity, insult, name, offense (or offence), personality, poke, put-down, sarcasm, slap, slight, slur

Synonyms: Verb

affront, dis (also diss) [slang], disrespect, insult, offend, slap, slight, wound

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun

Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue.

Verb

His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Aside from its official statement, Logitech hasn't responded further to the online outrage about the removal of local access. Valentina Palladino, Ars Technica, "Logitech disables local access on Harmony Hubs, breaks automation systems [Update]," 19 Dec. 2018 Taking it off air would be a gigantic shock and likely spark all sorts of outrage. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "'This Is Us' Fans Are Getting Super Nervous That the Show May Not Be Renewed for Season 4," 5 Mar. 2019 In light of the outrage against him, Hart bowed out of the role. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "Why There Isn't a Host for the Academy Awards Ceremony This Year," 23 Feb. 2019 Friends and allies urged fellow cisgender people, whether part of the LGBTQ community or not, to step up and share in the outrage, and to fight to protect transgender people’s rights. Elly Belle, Teen Vogue, "Transgender People and Allies React to Trump Memo on Limiting Gender Definition," 22 Oct. 2018 After the outrage settles, people walk off into the sunset to their respective corners. Fabiola Santiago, miamiherald, "A conversation about racism in Miami should include all groups – not just Cubans," 1 June 2018 International outrage over other incidents, like Saudi Arabia’s bombing of innocent children in Yemen and kidnapping of Lebanon’s prime minister, decreased with time. Alex Ward, Vox, "Why Jared Kushner reportedly wants Trump to stand by Saudi Arabia," 18 Oct. 2018 Sadly, outrage over these arrests has been largely overshadowed by the kingdom’s timely overturn of the ban — which came into effect just a month after the activists’ arrests. Rauza Khan, Teen Vogue, "Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince and Princess Have Been Praised For Being “Progressive” While Our Friend Spent Her Birthday in Jail," 10 Sep. 2018 The parental outrage over that test led Netflix to quickly remove it. Shannon Liao, The Verge, "Netflix is testing video promos that play in between episodes," 17 Aug. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The story outraged Musk, according to Bloomberg who turned to Gouthro, an ex-Marine who had previously worked security at Facebook. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "New Report Claims Tesla Engaged in Lies, Threats to Stop Leaks," 13 Mar. 2019 That agreement essentially forces Britain to retain close economic ties to the bloc for years to come—an outcome that has outraged euroskeptics. Max Colchester, WSJ, "Campaign to Oust U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Fizzles—for Now," 20 Nov. 2018 The slayings devastated the wider Chinese community and outraged many who felt the university was not doing enough to protect the safety of students navigating a new country. Melissa Etehad, latimes.com, "USC's aggressive recruiting of Chinese students faces challenge amid gynecologist scandal," 18 May 2018 Nowarah’s family was outraged that their son’s killer was convicted of negligence, not murder. Washington Post, BostonGlobe.com, "After a killing, an Israeli soldier and an Arab family confront justice," 16 June 2018 The strategy is to invite someone with a history of making sexist or racist comments, like provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, with the express purpose of outraging campus liberals. Zack Beauchamp, Vox, "A conservative Stanford professor plotted to dig up dirt on a liberal student," 1 June 2018 United Airlines has managed a feat to which no company aspires: outraging the world twice in less than a year. Bloomberg, latimes.com, "United CEO under microscope after dog's death recalls last year's passenger-dragging scandal," 15 Mar. 2018 Puppy stored in overhead bin follows death of giant rabbit Airline CEO gets good marks for restoring internal morale United Airlines has managed a feat to which no company aspires -- outraging the world twice in less than a year. Michael Sasso, Bloomberg.com, "Outcry Over Dead Dog Intensifies Pressure on United CEO," 15 Mar. 2018 Of course, the man’s new fans were outraged and blamed the pay cut on his looks. Andrea Romano, ajc, "25-year-old airport employee gets pay cut after going viral for being hot," 27 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Dictionary Entries near outrage

output

output shaft

outrace

outrage

outrageous

outrager

outrance

Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

7 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outrage

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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More from Merriam-Webster on outrage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with outrage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for outrage

Spanish Central: Translation of outrage

Nglish: Translation of outrage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of outrage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on outrage

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