outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an act of violence or brutality arranged outrages and assassinations— Anthony West
2a : injury, insult do no outrages on silly women or poor passengers— William Shakespeare
b : an act that violates accepted standards of behavior or taste an outrage alike against decency and dignity— John Buchan
3 : the anger and resentment aroused by injury or insult Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision.

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : rape
b : to violate the standards or principles of he has outraged respectability past endurance— John Braine
2 : to arouse anger or resentment in usually by some grave offense was outraged by the accusation

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Synonyms for outrage

Synonyms: Noun

affront, barb, brickbat, cut, dart, dig, dis (also diss) [slang], epithet, gird, indignity, insult, name, offense (or offence), personality, poke, put-down, sarcasm, slap, slight, slur

Synonyms: Verb

affront, dis (also diss) [slang], disrespect, insult, offend, slap, slight, wound

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Choose the Right Synonym for outrage

Verb

offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause hurt feelings or deep resentment. offend need not imply an intentional hurting but it may indicate merely a violation of the victim's sense of what is proper or fitting. hoped that my remarks had not offended her outrage implies offending beyond endurance and calling forth extreme feelings. outraged by their accusations affront implies treating with deliberate rudeness or contemptuous indifference to courtesy. deeply affronted by his callousness insult suggests deliberately causing humiliation, hurt pride, or shame. insulted every guest at the party

Examples of outrage in a Sentence

Noun

Many people expressed outrage at the court's decision. Public outrage over the scandal was great. The rule is an outrage against women. This is an outrage! I won't allow this kind of behavior to continue.

Verb

His comments outraged nearly everyone in the room. the spiteful comment outraged her so much that she's still holding a grudge
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Trump’s criticism of McRaven also triggered outrage among some current and former military and intelligence officials. Felicia Sonmez, The Seattle Times, "Trump again asserts bin Laden should have been caught more quickly," 19 Nov. 2018 Microsoft's decision to promote Edge within the operating system has prompted some amount of outrage and anger among certain kinds of Windows users and certain segments of the tech press. Peter Bright, Ars Technica, "Next Windows 10 update triggers outrage by continuing to promote Edge," 12 Sep. 2018 Trump cited national security concerns as a reason for imposing the tariffs, a justification that triggered outrage among U.S. allies while also angering some Republicans. Michael Collins, USA TODAY, "Senate takes step to push back on Trump over tariffs a day after China trade war escalates," 11 July 2018 Shaw caused outrage this week when a picture of him holidaying in Ibiza appeared across social media. SI.com, "Luke Shaw Determined to Prove Doubters Wrong as He Enters Final Year of Man Utd Contract," 1 July 2018 Poland is watering down its controversial law that criminalizes any suggestion the nation was responsible for the mass murder of Jews during World War II, five months after the legislation caused international outrage. Wojciech Moskwa, Bloomberg.com, "Poland Softens Holocaust Law That Caused an International Outcry," 27 June 2018 Die-hard Trump supporters remained steadfast, even as heart-rending photos of children held in cages and audio of terrified children crying out for their parents stoked outrage among Democrats and Republicans alike. Angie Wang And Dave Kolpack, Cincinnati.com, "Anderson Twp. Trustee Andrew Pappas among Trump supporters who backed policy to separate children," 21 June 2018 President Obama tried to hold families in detention indefinitely, in hopes of deterring new migrants, which caused public outrage at the time. refinery29.com, "Everything You Need To Know About Trump's Family Separation Policy," 20 June 2018 The new footage of Jiaku smoking caused outrage among animal lovers, who were shocked at the joy zoo visitors were taking from watching the ape smoke, and the fact that no keepers were present to stop guests from harassing the animal. Kelli Bender, PEOPLE.com, "Video Showing Zoo Guests Throwing Lit Cigarettes at Chimp Addicted to Smoking Causes Outrage," 7 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Despite their intentions, fans were outraged over Kelly and John's reactions. Blair Donovan, Country Living, "The Voice's Kelly Clarkson and John Legend Receive Backlash for Being 'Too Political'," 14 May 2019 The story outraged Musk, according to Bloomberg who turned to Gouthro, an ex-Marine who had previously worked security at Facebook. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "New Report Claims Tesla Engaged in Lies, Threats to Stop Leaks," 13 Mar. 2019 That agreement essentially forces Britain to retain close economic ties to the bloc for years to come—an outcome that has outraged euroskeptics. Max Colchester, WSJ, "Campaign to Oust U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May Fizzles—for Now," 20 Nov. 2018 The slayings devastated the wider Chinese community and outraged many who felt the university was not doing enough to protect the safety of students navigating a new country. Melissa Etehad, latimes.com, "USC's aggressive recruiting of Chinese students faces challenge amid gynecologist scandal," 18 May 2018 Nowarah’s family was outraged that their son’s killer was convicted of negligence, not murder. Washington Post, BostonGlobe.com, "After a killing, an Israeli soldier and an Arab family confront justice," 16 June 2018 The strategy is to invite someone with a history of making sexist or racist comments, like provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, with the express purpose of outraging campus liberals. Zack Beauchamp, Vox, "A conservative Stanford professor plotted to dig up dirt on a liberal student," 1 June 2018 United Airlines has managed a feat to which no company aspires: outraging the world twice in less than a year. Bloomberg, latimes.com, "United CEO under microscope after dog's death recalls last year's passenger-dragging scandal," 15 Mar. 2018 Puppy stored in overhead bin follows death of giant rabbit Airline CEO gets good marks for restoring internal morale United Airlines has managed a feat to which no company aspires -- outraging the world twice in less than a year. Michael Sasso, Bloomberg.com, "Outcry Over Dead Dog Intensifies Pressure on United CEO," 15 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'outrage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of outrage

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1590, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for outrage

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French utrage, outrage insult, excess, from outre, utre beyond, from Latin ultra — more at ultra-

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Dictionary Entries near outrage

output

output shaft

outrace

outrage

outrageous

outrager

outrance

Statistics for outrage

Last Updated

4 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for outrage

The first known use of outrage was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for outrage

outrage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: extreme anger : a strong feeling of unhappiness because of something bad, hurtful, or morally wrong
: something that hurts people or is morally wrong

outrage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone) very angry

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Kids Definition of outrage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : angry feelings caused by a hurtful, unjust, or insulting act
2 : an act that is hurtful or unjust or shows disrespect for a person's feelings

outrage

verb
outraged; outraging

Kids Definition of outrage (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to cause to feel anger or strong resentment We were outraged by the way we were treated.
2 : to cause to suffer great insult Her words outraged his dignity.

outrage

noun
out·​rage | \ ˈau̇t-ˌrāj How to pronounce outrage (audio) \

Legal Definition of outrage

1 : a deeply offensive or violent act
2 : the tort of intentionally inflicting emotional distress

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More from Merriam-Webster on outrage

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with outrage

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for outrage

Spanish Central: Translation of outrage

Nglish: Translation of outrage for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of outrage for Arabic Speakers

Comments on outrage

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