jury

noun
ju·​ry | \ ˈju̇r-ē How to pronounce jury (audio) , ˈjər- \
plural juries

Definition of jury

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : a body of persons sworn to give a verdict on some matter submitted to them especially : a body of persons legally selected and sworn to inquire into any matter of fact and to give their verdict according to the evidence
2 : a committee for judging and awarding prizes at a contest or exhibition
3 : one (such as the public or test results) that will decide used especially in the phrase the jury is still out

jury

verb
juried; jurying

Definition of jury (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

: to select material as appropriate for exhibition in (something, such as an art show) used chiefly as a participle a juried show

jury

adjective

Definition of jury (Entry 3 of 3)

: improvised for temporary use especially in an emergency : makeshift a jury mast a jury rig

Examples of jury in a Sentence

Noun The jury failed to reach a verdict. She was selected to serve on a jury.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In a May 21 verdict following a trial, a six person jury found that race played a motivating factor in AdventHealth’s decision to terminate Rop from a radiology residency. Kalia Richardson, orlandosentinel.com, 4 June 2021 In 2016, a jury found former suburban Chicago police officer Drew Peterson guilty of trying to hire someone to kill the prosecutor who helped to convict him in the killing of his third wife, Kathleen Savio. BostonGlobe.com, 31 May 2021 The jury found Cristhian Bahena Rivera guilty of first-degree murder in the stabbing death of Mollie Tibbetts, who is remembered as a friendly 20-year-old who was studying to become a child psychologist. Ryan J. Foley, chicagotribune.com, 28 May 2021 For several months, Avenatti was held in a notorious New York City federal lockup until shortly after a jury found the 50-year old guilty of trying to extort Nike. Fox News, 28 May 2021 In that case, a jury found Kenneth Wayne Thompson carried out the slayings to protect his nephew from receiving psychiatric treatment, which his attorneys argued is barred by the church’s doctrines. James Queally, Los Angeles Times, 27 May 2021 During his opening statement at the trial on Wednesday, prosecutor Bart Klaver told the jury that an autopsy determined Tibbetts was stabbed seven to 12 times in the neck, head and chest. Bill Hutchinson, ABC News, 20 May 2021 Defense attorney John Mays told the jury of 12 with two alternates that Moss will testify in the trial. al, 19 May 2021 David Chesnoff, another lawyer on the defense team, told the jury. New York Times, 17 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb However, some courts have historically found that falsely accusing a person of treason is self-evidently injurious to an individual’s reputation and livelihood, lowering the bar to jury trial or damages. Washington Post, 8 Dec. 2020 However, some courts have historically found that falsely accusing a person of treason is self-evidently injurious to an individual’s reputation and livelihood, lowering the bar to jury trial or damages. Anchorage Daily News, 8 Dec. 2020 All jury trials will be rescheduled, as will jury selection on April 3. Joe Guillen, Detroit Free Press, 14 Mar. 2020 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective But Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kelly, after a non-jury trial, found that San Francisco had legitimate reasons, including costs and fairness, to charge higher rates for more expensive transactions. Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle, 26 May 2021 The non-jury trial is being heard by U.S. District Judge Xavier Rodriguez, who is to determine whether the government is liable. Guillermo Contreras, San Antonio Express-News, 9 Apr. 2021 But the appeals court said there was evidence to support a Ventura County Superior Court Judge Anthony Sabo’s conclusion, after a non-jury trial, that Hoffman should remain confined. Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle, 16 Mar. 2021 But after a non-jury trial, Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kelly found that San Francisco had legitimate reasons, including costs and fairness, to charge higher rates for more expensive transactions. Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle, 2 Mar. 2021 Judge Joseph Slights III has set a Jan. 5 non-jury trial to decide whether LVMH must consummate the deal. Kim Bhasin, Fortune, 29 Sep. 2020 While immigration judges wear black robes and preside over non-jury proceedings, they are considered federal attorneys with the Justice Department and can be removed from their positions by the U.S. Attorney General. Julie Watson, Star Tribune, 3 Nov. 2020 Judge Joseph Slights III has set a Jan. 5 non-jury trial to decide whether LVMH must consummate the deal. Kim Bhasin, Fortune, 29 Sep. 2020 Kallon, who held a non-jury trial and heard from witnesses in September, also ruled that the state could not prohibit counties from offering curbside voting as an option on Nov. 3. Mike Cason | Mcason@al.com, al, 29 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jury.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of jury

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1947, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for jury

Noun and Verb

Middle English jure, from Anglo-French juree, from jurer to swear, from Latin jurare, from jur-, jus

Adjective

Middle English jory (in jory saile improvised sail)

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Time Traveler for jury

Time Traveler

The first known use of jury was in the 15th century

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Statistics for jury

Last Updated

13 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Jury.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jury. Accessed 14 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for jury

jury

noun

English Language Learners Definition of jury

: a group of people who are members of the public and are chosen to make a decision in a legal case
: a group of people who decide the winners in a contest

jury

noun
ju·​ry | \ ˈju̇r-ē How to pronounce jury (audio) \
plural juries

Kids Definition of jury

1 : a group of citizens chosen to hear and decide the facts of a case in a court of law
2 : a committee that judges and awards prizes (as at an exhibition)

jury

noun
ju·​ry | \ ˈju̇r-ē How to pronounce jury (audio) \
plural juries

Legal Definition of jury

: a body of individuals sworn to give a decision on some matter submitted to them especially : a body of individuals selected and sworn to inquire into a question of fact and to give their verdict according to the evidence occasionally used with a pl. verb the jury are always to decide whether the inference shall be drawn — Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. — see also advisory jury, array, grand jury, inquest, jury nullification, petit jury, special jury, trial jury, venire

Note: The jury of American and English law most likely originated in early Anglo-Norman property proceedings, where a body of 12 knights or freemen who were from the area, and usually familiar with the parties, would take an oath and answer questions put to them by a judge in order to determine property rights. Jury verdicts began to be used in felony cases in the early 1200s as the use of the trial by ordeal declined. The questions put to those early juries were usually questions of fact or mixed questions of fact and law. Modern juries may deal with questions of law in addition to questions of fact when rendering general verdicts, or in specific cases under state law. Federal juries are usually limited to dealing with questions of fact. The modern jury can vary in size depending on the proceeding but is usually made up of 6 or 12 members. According to federal law, federal grand and petit juries must be “selected at random from a fair cross-section of the community in the district or division wherein the court convenes.” State jury selection varies and occasionally differs from federal, but the states still must meet constitutional requirements for due process. The U.S. Supreme Court has stated in a series of decisions that a jury is to be composed of “peers and equals,” and that systematic exclusion of a particular class (as on the basis of gender, race, or ancestry) from a jury violates the equal protection clause and the defendant's right to a jury trial. A defendant is not, however, entitled to a jury of any particular composition.

History and Etymology for jury

Anglo-French juree, from feminine past participle of Old French jurer to swear, from Latin jurare, from jur-, jus law

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