jury

noun
ju·​ry | \ ˈju̇r-ē How to pronounce jury (audio) , ˈjər- \
plural juries

Definition of jury

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : a body of persons sworn to give a verdict on some matter submitted to them especially : a body of persons legally selected and sworn to inquire into any matter of fact and to give their verdict according to the evidence
2 : a committee for judging and awarding prizes at a contest or exhibition
3 : one (such as the public or test results) that will decide used especially in the phrase the jury is still out

jury

verb
juried; jurying

Definition of jury (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

: to select material as appropriate for exhibition in (something, such as an art show) used chiefly as a participle a juried show

jury

adjective

Definition of jury (Entry 3 of 3)

: improvised for temporary use especially in an emergency : makeshift a jury mast a jury rig

Examples of jury in a Sentence

Noun The jury failed to reach a verdict. She was selected to serve on a jury.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Jones’ lawyer Andino Reynal told the jury during closing arguments that a large judgment would have a chilling effect on people seeking to hold governments accountable. Michael R. Sisak, Anchorage Daily News, 7 Aug. 2022 Jones’ lawyer Andino Reynal told the jury during closing arguments that a large judgment would have a chilling effect on people seeking to hold governments accountable. Michael R. Sisak, Hartford Courant, 7 Aug. 2022 Neil Heslin, Jesse’s father, told the jury there were gunshots fired into his house and car. Teresa M. Hanafin, BostonGlobe.com, 5 Aug. 2022 Victim impact statements add another layer, giving the families and friends of the victims their own day in court, though the judge told the jury the statements are not meant to be weighed as aggravating factors. Dakin Andone, Sara Weisfeldt And Leyla Santiago, CNN, 3 Aug. 2022 Isabel Dalu, a family friend for Denise and Damian Loughran, parents of Cara Loughran, 14, told the jury that the teenager was a straight-A student who loved to surf and perform Irish dance. Rafael Olmeda, Sun Sentinel, 3 Aug. 2022 Heslin told the jury about holding his son with a bullet hole through his head, even describing the extent of the damage to his son’s body. Jim Vertuno, Chicago Tribune, 2 Aug. 2022 Heslin told the jury about holding his son with a bullet hole through his head, even describing the extent of the damage to his son's body. CBS News, 2 Aug. 2022 Corcoran told the jury, turning his focus on Kristin Amerling, the House committee's chief counsel and the government's main witness. Kevin Johnson, USA TODAY, 22 July 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Debuting in May, the brand will consist of both cosmetics and tools — things Davy would jury rig on set and was able to make a reality — like a device to help achieve the ultimate sharp Maddy wing. Kirbie Johnson, Allure, 15 Feb. 2022 Dean will jury those works from over one hundred images that are being submitted to him. Myrna Petlicki, chicagotribune.com, 7 Feb. 2022 However, some courts have historically found that falsely accusing a person of treason is self-evidently injurious to an individual’s reputation and livelihood, lowering the bar to jury trial or damages. Washington Post, 8 Dec. 2020 However, some courts have historically found that falsely accusing a person of treason is self-evidently injurious to an individual’s reputation and livelihood, lowering the bar to jury trial or damages. Anchorage Daily News, 8 Dec. 2020 All jury trials will be rescheduled, as will jury selection on April 3. Joe Guillen, Detroit Free Press, 14 Mar. 2020 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 All submissions are reviewed by a jurying committee and acceptance notices are sent out. Courant Community, 10 July 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Many of the lawsuits that stem from these disputes wind up in the Delaware Court of Chancery, a non-jury court which has become a premier battleground for business disputes because of the state's business-friendly incorporation laws. Bailey Schulz, USA TODAY, 18 July 2022 Weber, a former public defender who was appointed to the bench in 2010, presided over the non-jury trial. oregonlive, 6 June 2022 Wright, 21, chose to have a non-jury trial, which took place over three days earlier this month. Kevin Grasha, The Enquirer, 25 May 2022 The judge wrote that the non-jury trial is expected to last six to eight weeks. Mike Cason | Mcason@al.com, al, 19 May 2022 Batali opted for a non-jury trial and left the decision in the judge's hands. Brendan Morrow, The Week, 10 May 2022 The non-jury trial will take place before U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan federal court. NBC News, 14 Dec. 2021 As for Zack Scott, who technically still is the Mets GM, his drunk driving case will go to a non-jury trial Dec. 8. BostonGlobe.com, 10 Oct. 2021 Theane Evangelis, a lawyer for Grubhub, noted that U.S. Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley of San Francisco had previously held a non-jury trial in the case and ruled that the drivers should be classified as contractors. Bob Egelko, San Francisco Chronicle, 20 Sep. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jury.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of jury

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1947, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for jury

Noun and Verb

Middle English jure, from Anglo-French juree, from jurer to swear, from Latin jurare, from jur-, jus

Adjective

Middle English jory (in jory saile improvised sail)

Learn More About jury

Time Traveler for jury

Time Traveler

The first known use of jury was in the 15th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near jury

jurupaite

jury

jury chancellor

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for jury

Last Updated

12 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Jury.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jury. Accessed 14 Aug. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for jury

jury

noun
ju·​ry | \ ˈju̇r-ē How to pronounce jury (audio) \
plural juries

Kids Definition of jury

1 : a group of citizens chosen to hear and decide the facts of a case in a court of law
2 : a committee that judges and awards prizes (as at an exhibition)

jury

noun
ju·​ry | \ ˈju̇r-ē How to pronounce jury (audio) \
plural juries

Legal Definition of jury

: a body of individuals sworn to give a decision on some matter submitted to them especially : a body of individuals selected and sworn to inquire into a question of fact and to give their verdict according to the evidence occasionally used with a pl. verb the jury are always to decide whether the inference shall be drawn — Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. — see also advisory jury, array, grand jury, inquest, jury nullification, petit jury, special jury, trial jury, venire

Note: The jury of American and English law most likely originated in early Anglo-Norman property proceedings, where a body of 12 knights or freemen who were from the area, and usually familiar with the parties, would take an oath and answer questions put to them by a judge in order to determine property rights. Jury verdicts began to be used in felony cases in the early 1200s as the use of the trial by ordeal declined. The questions put to those early juries were usually questions of fact or mixed questions of fact and law. Modern juries may deal with questions of law in addition to questions of fact when rendering general verdicts, or in specific cases under state law. Federal juries are usually limited to dealing with questions of fact. The modern jury can vary in size depending on the proceeding but is usually made up of 6 or 12 members. According to federal law, federal grand and petit juries must be “selected at random from a fair cross-section of the community in the district or division wherein the court convenes.” State jury selection varies and occasionally differs from federal, but the states still must meet constitutional requirements for due process. The U.S. Supreme Court has stated in a series of decisions that a jury is to be composed of “peers and equals,” and that systematic exclusion of a particular class (as on the basis of gender, race, or ancestry) from a jury violates the equal protection clause and the defendant's right to a jury trial. A defendant is not, however, entitled to a jury of any particular composition.

History and Etymology for jury

Anglo-French juree, from feminine past participle of Old French jurer to swear, from Latin jurare, from jur-, jus law

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

The Great British Vocabulary Quiz

  • union jack speech bubble
  • Named after Sir Robert Peel, what are British police called?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!