judge

noun
\ ˈjəj How to pronounce judge (audio) \

Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: one who makes judgments: such as
a : a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court
b : one appointed to decide in a contest or competition : umpire
c : one who gives an authoritative opinion
d : critic
e often capitalized : a tribal hero exercising leadership among the Hebrews after the death of Joshua

judge

verb
judged; judging

Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to form an opinion about through careful weighing of evidence and testing of premises
2 : to form an estimate or evaluation of trying to judge the amount of time required especially : to form a negative opinion about shouldn't judge him because of his accent
3 : to hold as an opinion : guess, think I judge she knew what she was doing
4 : to sit in judgment on : try judge a case
5 : to determine or pronounce after inquiry and deliberation They judged him guilty.
6 : govern, rule used of a Hebrew tribal leader

intransitive verb

1 : to form an opinion
2 : to decide as a judge

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Other Words from judge

Noun

judgeship \ ˈjəj-​ˌship How to pronounce judgeship (audio) \ noun

Verb

judger noun

Choose the Right Synonym for judge

Verb

infer, deduce, conclude, judge, gather mean to arrive at a mental conclusion. infer implies arriving at a conclusion by reasoning from evidence; if the evidence is slight, the term comes close to surmise. from that remark, I inferred that they knew each other deduce often adds to infer the special implication of drawing a particular inference from a generalization. denied we could deduce anything important from human mortality conclude implies arriving at a necessary inference at the end of a chain of reasoning. concluded that only the accused could be guilty judge stresses a weighing of the evidence on which a conclusion is based. judge people by their actions gather suggests an intuitive forming of a conclusion from implications. gathered their desire to be alone without a word

Examples of judge in a Sentence

Noun

She's one of the strictest judges in the state. He served as a judge at the baking contest. “I don't think we should trust her.” “Let me be the judge of that.” She is a good judge of character.

Verb

You should not judge people by their appearance. He was trying to judge the strength of his opponent. We should do whatever we judge to be the right thing. Who are you to judge me? He feels that they have judged him unfairly. Don't judge her too severely. The jury will be asked to judge the defendant's guilt. If you are accused of a crime you have the right to be judged by a jury of your peers.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Michelle Visage, a close friend, Drag Race judge, and cohost of RuPaul’s podcast, uses the word otherworldly. Abby Aguirre, Vogue, "How the World Fell Head Over Heels for RuPaul," 15 Apr. 2019 Senate Republicans continue to confirm judges like planes lined up on a tarmac, with seven appellate nominees finished this year. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "A Ninth Circuit Test for the White House," 29 Mar. 2019 Advertising More than 1,400 federal lawsuits over the opioid crisis have been consolidated in front of a single judge in Cleveland who is pushing the drugmakers and distributors to reach a nationwide settlement. Geoff Mulvihill, The Seattle Times, "Maker of OxyContin agrees to $270M settlement in Oklahoma," 27 Mar. 2019 Margiela will be on a panel of judges who include M/M Paris founders Michaël Amzalag and Mathias Augustyniak, photographer Harley Weir, and Vogue Paris editor in chief Emmanuelle Alt. Steff Yotka, Vogue, "Elusive No More, Martin Margiela Will Judge This Year’s ANDAM Prize," 20 Mar. 2019 But instead of showing off designer outfits to a panel of judges, the competitors will be showing off designer rooms. Elizabeth Gulino, House Beautiful, "Genevieve Gorder’s New Show Is Like Project Runway for Interior Designers," 19 Mar. 2019 This year's judges consisted of Instyle magazine editor in chief Laura Brown, former Lanvin creative director Alber Elbaz, and Tim Blanks just to name a few. Chrissy Rutherford, Harper's BAZAAR, "Edward Crutchley and Colovos Take Home the 2019 Woolmark Prizes," 18 Feb. 2019 Kulis, the lawyer representing Roberson’s family, filed a motion with a judge that seeks to preserve any footage the departments may have. P.r. Lockhart, Vox, "A black security guard caught a shooting suspect — only to be shot by police minutes later," 23 Jan. 2019 Katy Perry, Luke Bryan, and Lionel Richie will all assume their posts as judges, while Ryan Seacrest hosts. Country Living Staff, Country Living, "Everything You Need to Know About 'American Idol' Season 17," 24 Feb. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

And judging by the ombré origami dress that Kelsey Lu wore onstage there last year, the dress code is just as progressive as the project’s conceit. Vogue, "Forget Coachella: These Far-Flung Alternatives Are Pushing Festival Style Forward," 9 Mar. 2019 Location: Piermont, New York Price: $469,000 Don’t judge a book by its cover, because this two-bedroom, two-bath midcentury gem about 40 minutes north of Manhattan could be a gorgeous home with a bit of sweat equity. Megan Barber, Curbed, "Midcentury fixer upper right outside of NYC asks $469K," 29 Aug. 2018 With that being said, judging is, of course, subjective and there were some agreeing with the Deal or No Deal host about Noah. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "'America's Got Talent' Viewers Were Fuming at “Party Pooper” Howie Mandel Last Night," 22 Aug. 2018 Best Room Wins—hosted by design maven Genevieve Gorder and judged by ELLE Decor Editor-in-Chief Whitney Robinson—will premiere on Thursday, May 2nd, at 9:30 p.m. EST. Lucia Tonelli, ELLE Decor, "A First Look at Best Room Wins, Bravo’s New Interior Design Competition Series," 14 Mar. 2019 Clearly, something ineffable has been lost in the shopping experience—and not only for me—judging from the revival and broadened scope of in-store dining. Alex Witchel, Town & Country, "The Best Department Stores Are All Opening Restaurants," 25 Feb. 2019 But judging from the fall 2018 runways, the Western style is about to go much more mainstream. Christina Draper, Glamour, "Cowboy Boots Are Definitely Coming Back (Like, for Real) for Fall 2018," 11 Sep. 2018 About 80 people attended a July 11 commission work session, and judging from public comment roughly 75 percent favored the petition. Bill Banks, ajc, "Avondale Estates residents sign petition advocating ‘smart growth’," 13 July 2018 After throwing for about 10 minutes, Danny increased the pace and — judging from the popping of the mitt — the velocity. David Haugh, chicagotribune.com, "Operating on Danny Farquhar's brain didn't change what was in White Sox pitcher's heart," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'judge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of judge

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for judge

Noun

Middle English juge, from Anglo-French, from Latin judex — see judge entry 2

Verb

Middle English juggen, from Anglo-French juger, from Latin judicare, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to decide, say — more at just, diction

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Statistics for judge

Last Updated

19 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for judge

The first known use of judge was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for judge

judge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

law : a person who has the power to make decisions on cases brought before a court of law
: a person who decides the winner in a contest or competition
: a person who makes a decision or judgment

judge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

: to form an opinion about (something or someone) after careful thought
: to regard (someone) as either good or bad
: to make an official decision about (a legal case)

judge

verb
\ ˈjəj How to pronounce judge (audio) \
judged; judging

Kids Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to form an opinion after careful consideration I judged the distance badly.
2 : to act with authority to reach a decision (as in a trial)
3 : think sense 1 What do you judge is the best solution?
4 : to form an opinion of in comparison with others She judged pies at the fair.

judge

noun

Kids Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a public official whose duty is to decide questions brought before a court
2 : a person appointed to decide in a contest or competition
3 : a person with the experience to give a meaningful opinion : critic He's a good judge of talent.

judge

verb
\ ˈjəj How to pronounce judge (audio) \
judged; judging

Legal Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to hear and decide (as a litigated question) in a court of justice judge a case
2 : to pronounce after inquiry and deliberation he was judged incompetent

intransitive verb

: to make a determination : decide judge between two accounts

judge

noun

Legal Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a public official vested with the authority to hear, determine, and preside over legal matters brought in court also : one (as a justice of the peace) who performs one or more functions of such an official

History and Etymology for judge

Verb

Old French jugier, from Latin judicare, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to decide, say

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More from Merriam-Webster on judge

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with judge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for judge

Spanish Central: Translation of judge

Nglish: Translation of judge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of judge for Arabic Speakers

Comments on judge

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