judge

noun
\ ˈjəj \

Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: one who makes judgments: such as
a : a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court
b : one appointed to decide in a contest or competition : umpire
c : one who gives an authoritative opinion
d : critic
e often capitalized : a tribal hero exercising leadership among the Hebrews after the death of Joshua

judge

verb
judged; judging

Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to form an opinion about through careful weighing of evidence and testing of premises
2 : to form an estimate or evaluation of trying to judge the amount of time required especially : to form a negative opinion about shouldn't judge him because of his accent
3 : to hold as an opinion : guess, think I judge she knew what she was doing
4 : to sit in judgment on : try judge a case
5 : to determine or pronounce after inquiry and deliberation They judged him guilty.
6 : govern, rule used of a Hebrew tribal leader

intransitive verb

1 : to form an opinion
2 : to decide as a judge

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Other Words from judge

Noun

judgeship \ ˈjəj-​ˌship \ noun

Verb

judger noun

Choose the Right Synonym for judge

Verb

infer, deduce, conclude, judge, gather mean to arrive at a mental conclusion. infer implies arriving at a conclusion by reasoning from evidence; if the evidence is slight, the term comes close to surmise. from that remark, I inferred that they knew each other deduce often adds to infer the special implication of drawing a particular inference from a generalization. denied we could deduce anything important from human mortality conclude implies arriving at a necessary inference at the end of a chain of reasoning. concluded that only the accused could be guilty judge stresses a weighing of the evidence on which a conclusion is based. judge people by their actions gather suggests an intuitive forming of a conclusion from implications. gathered their desire to be alone without a word

Examples of judge in a Sentence

Noun

She's one of the strictest judges in the state. He served as a judge at the baking contest. “I don't think we should trust her.” “Let me be the judge of that.” She is a good judge of character.

Verb

You should not judge people by their appearance. He was trying to judge the strength of his opponent. We should do whatever we judge to be the right thing. Who are you to judge me? He feels that they have judged him unfairly. Don't judge her too severely. The jury will be asked to judge the defendant's guilt. If you are accused of a crime you have the right to be judged by a jury of your peers.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Typically, Chief Justice Roberts has used the occasion to comment on matters of concern to judges, from laments over lagging salaries to courtroom safety, and this year’s report largely followed that precedent. Jess Bravin, WSJ, "Chief Justice Roberts Addresses Misconduct in Judiciary, Avoids Politics," 31 Dec. 2018 The latest threat came last week when a federal judge in Texas ruled the ACA unconstitutional. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Almost Two-Thirds of Women in the U.S. Use Some Form of Birth Control," 20 Dec. 2018 Supermodel and America's Got Talent judge Heidi Klum spills all her tips for looking and feeling her best. Maddie Aberman, Redbook, "Heidi Klum Shares Her Trick for Glowing From Within," 14 Dec. 2018 Burroughs was nominated for the federal bench by Barack Obama, and distinguished herself in January 2017 as one of the judges who delayed or blocked the first iteration of Trump's travel ban. Chloe Foussianes, Town & Country, "A Timeline of the Harvard Affirmative Action Lawsuit," 2 Nov. 2018 Yu Ho-Jin also showed off his insane card skills to the judges in 2016. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "The Illusionists of 'America's Got Talent' Have a Surprisingly Familiar Face In Their Cast," 22 Aug. 2018 By classifying lynching and attempted lynching as a federal hate crime, the bill enables judges to impose additional sentencing enhancements on top of any other charges when determining the punishment for those convicted of such crimes. P.r. Lockhart, Vox, "By passing the Justice for Victims of Lynching Act this week, the Senate acknowledged its role in decades of racial terrorism.," 21 Dec. 2018 Texas does not have recall elections for judges, but Strother’s term expires in 2020. Nomaan Merchant, The Seattle Times, "Activists decry no-jail sentence for former frat president," 12 Dec. 2018 Everyone’s favorite judges are back to consider a crop of amateur (aka terrible) bakers who duke it out for a prize of $10,000. Michaela Bechler, Vogue, "The Best Holiday Specials to Watch (and Stream) Now," 7 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

And while 68% of people felt there was stigma around estrangement that made them feel judged, around 80% still felt there were at least some positive outcomes from ending that relationship. Ashley Edwards Walker, Good Housekeeping, "Modern Estrangement: What Does It Mean to Be Estranged, Anyway?," 21 Dec. 2018 There’s an old Parks and Recreation episode that finds Leslie and Tom judging the Miss Pawnee pageant; Leslie guns for Susan, a great student and an expert piano player and a volunteer at a children’s hospital. Megan Garber, The Atlantic, "Miss America 2.0: The Inner Beauty Pageant?," 5 June 2018 America’s preferential treatment and diversity programs are in blatant disregard of Martin Luther King’s dream about judging people by their character instead of by the color of their skin. WSJ, "To What Extent, if Any, Should Race Count?," 18 Dec. 2018 But it is not tasked with judging the credibility of the allegations, the Justice Department said. Kaitlyn Schallhorn, Fox News, "Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford wants FBI to investigate assault claim: Why the bureau likely won't," 19 Sep. 2018 The performance of Kilmarnock prison is judged by 42 indicators, none of which measures reoffending rates. The Economist, "Britain’s outsourcing model, copied around the world, is in trouble," 28 June 2018 Customs and Border Protection field chiefs over all nine Southwest border districts can use their discretion in judging how young is too young, officials said. NBC News, "Trump officials send migrant babies, toddlers to 'tender age' shelters," 20 June 2018 But that data hasn’t stopped politicians from trying to restrict what low-income people can purchase, or neighbors and cashiers from judging their grocery carts. Aubrey Nagle, Philly.com, "Shooting at Trenton arts fest, Jersey Shore feels the heat of climate change | Morning Newsletter," 18 June 2018 Or if, as Business Insider suggested, Facebook is backing away from CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s statements that the company wouldn’t be in the business of judging which news is trustworthy. Kevin Kelleher, Fortune, "Help Wanted: Facebook Needs People for 'News Credibility'," 8 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'judge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of judge

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for judge

Noun

Middle English juge, from Anglo-French, from Latin judex — see judge entry 2

Verb

Middle English juggen, from Anglo-French juger, from Latin judicare, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to decide, say — more at just, diction

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Statistics for judge

Last Updated

11 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for judge

The first known use of judge was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for judge

judge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to form an opinion about (something or someone) after careful thought

: to regard (someone) as either good or bad

law : to make an official decision about (a legal case)

judge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

law : a person who has the power to make decisions on cases brought before a court of law

: a person who decides the winner in a contest or competition

: a person who makes a decision or judgment

judge

verb
\ ˈjəj \
judged; judging

Kids Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to form an opinion after careful consideration I judged the distance badly.
2 : to act with authority to reach a decision (as in a trial)
3 : think sense 1 What do you judge is the best solution?
4 : to form an opinion of in comparison with others She judged pies at the fair.

judge

noun

Kids Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a public official whose duty is to decide questions brought before a court
2 : a person appointed to decide in a contest or competition
3 : a person with the experience to give a meaningful opinion : critic He's a good judge of talent.

judge

verb
\ ˈjəj \
judged; judging

Legal Definition of judge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to hear and decide (as a litigated question) in a court of justice judge a case
2 : to pronounce after inquiry and deliberation he was judged incompetent

intransitive verb

: to make a determination : decide judge between two accounts

judge

noun

Legal Definition of judge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a public official vested with the authority to hear, determine, and preside over legal matters brought in court also : one (as a justice of the peace) who performs one or more functions of such an official

History and Etymology for judge

Verb

Old French jugier, from Latin judicare, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to decide, say

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More from Merriam-Webster on judge

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with judge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for judge

Spanish Central: Translation of judge

Nglish: Translation of judge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of judge for Arabic Speakers

Comments on judge

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