adjudicate

verb
ad·ju·di·cate | \ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Definition of adjudicate 

transitive verb

: to make an official decision about who is right in (a dispute) : to settle judicially The school board will adjudicate claims made against teachers.

intransitive verb

: to act as judge The court can adjudicate on this dispute.

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Other Words from adjudicate

adjudicative \-ˌkā-tiv, -kə- \ adjective
adjudicator \-ˌkā-tər \ noun
adjudicatory \-ˈjü-di-kə-ˌtȯr-ē \ adjective

Did You Know?

Adjudicate is one of several terms that give testimony to the influence of jus, the Latin word for "law," on our legal language. Adjudicate is from the Latin verb adjudicare, from judicare, meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun judex, meaning "judge." English has other judex words, such as judgment, judicial, judiciary, and prejudice. If we admit further evidence, we discover that the root of judex is jus, the word for "law." What's the verdict? Latin law words frequently preside in English-speaking courtrooms. In addition to the judex words, jury, justice, injury, and perjury are all ultimately from Latin jus.

Examples of adjudicate in a Sentence

The board will adjudicate claims made against teachers. The case was adjudicated in the state courts. The board will adjudicate when claims are made against teachers.
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Recent Examples on the Web

More important, some of the cases adjudicated by the tribunals are also getting bogged down in bitter, protracted legal challenges. Iain Marlow, Bloomberg.com, "India’s Push to Fast-Track Bankruptcies," 26 June 2018 Democrats generally prefer to release asylum seekers into the country while their claims are being adjudicated, as has been mostly the case in the Obama and Bush administrations. Siobhan Hughes, WSJ, "GOP Leaders Bracing for Second Defeat on Immigration," 25 June 2018 As a result, border agents are separating children from parents and detaining them separately as the cases are adjudicated. Jeff Manning, OregonLive.com, "Columbia Sportswear's Boyle blasts Trump immigration policies," 9 June 2018 Previously, unauthorized immigrants were usually charged with civil violations and allowed to stay with their children while their cases were adjudicated. The Star-telegram Editorial Board, star-telegram, "Separating immigrant children from their parents is inhumane and should end," 5 June 2018 But the Supreme Court hasn’t adjudicated a vertical merger since 1972 when a majority blocked Ford’s acquisition of a spark plug manufacturer. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "Trump’s Merger Appeal to Obama," 13 July 2018 Nearly all of the asylum seekers were placed in Florida jails while their status was adjudicated, many for months on end. Brianna Nofil, Time, "Family Separation Is Officially Over, but History Suggests the U.S. Won't Find a Good Solution for Migrant Children," 28 June 2018 In October, he was adjudicated not guilty by reason of insanity on all the charges and the judge appointed guardians to handle his care, court records show. Jerry Fallstrom, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Clermont police sergeant who missed bullet 'by inches' honored for valor, heroism," 7 June 2018 Since losing her parliamentary majority last year, May has been forced to adjudicate between warring factions within her Conservative Party, something that has led her to postpone a number of important decisions. Stephen Castle, BostonGlobe.com, "Facing defeat on Brexit, Theresa May gives ground to UK’s Parliament," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adjudicate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adjudicate

circa 1695, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for adjudicate

borrowed from Latin adjūdicātus, past participle of adjūdicāre "to adjudge"

Latin adjudicare to award in judgment, from ad to, for + judicare to judge — see judge

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Last Updated

7 Oct 2018

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Time Traveler for adjudicate

The first known use of adjudicate was circa 1695

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More Definitions for adjudicate

adjudicate

verb
ad·ju·di·cate | \ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkāt \
adjudicated; adjudicating

Legal Definition of adjudicate 

transitive verb

1 : to settle either finally or temporarily (the rights and duties of the parties to a judicial or quasi-judicial proceeding) on the merits of the issues raised

2 : to pass judgment on as a judge : settle judicially

3 : to pronounce judicially to be was adjudicated a bankrupt was adjudicated the child's father

4 : to convey by judicial sale

intransitive verb

: to come to a judicial decision : act as judge the court adjudicated upon the case

Other Words from adjudicate

adjudication \ə-ˌjü-di-ˈkā-shən \ noun
adjudicative \ə-ˈjü-di-ˌkā-tiv, -kə- \ noun
adjudicator \-ˌkā-tər \ noun

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