judicial

adjective
ju·​di·​cial | \ jü-ˈdi-shəl How to pronounce judicial (audio) \

Definition of judicial

1a : of or relating to a judgment, the function of judging, the administration of justice, or the judiciary judicial processes judicial powers
b : belonging to the branch of government that is charged with trying all cases that involve the government and with the administration of justice within its jurisdiction — compare executive, legislative
2 : ordered or enforced by a court a judicial sale
3 : belonging or appropriate to a judge or the judiciary judicial robes judicial dignity
4 : of, characterized by, or expressing judgment : critical sense 2d
5 : arising from a judgment of God

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Other Words from judicial

judicially \ jü-​ˈdi-​sh(ə-​)lē How to pronounce judicially (audio) \ adverb

Examples of judicial in a Sentence

the judicial branch of government
Recent Examples on the Web In the meantime, courts can move forward with all other judicial proceedings, provided they can be conducted legally and safely. Christian Boone, ajc, "GA Supreme Court extends COVID-19 judicial emergency," 10 July 2020 Meanwhile, Xochil’s father, former Congressman (and current Justice of the Peace) Ciro Rodriguez, has been something of a shadow presence, risking judicial-conduct violations by campaigning for his daughter. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Garcia: Family feuds define Democratic runoffs," 10 July 2020 The Secretary of State was listed as a party in the other two cases, which more directly involved Marion County's handling of early voting and judicial elections. Chris Sikich, The Indianapolis Star, "Lawsuit: Indiana election law on polling hours strips Hoosiers of Constitutional rights," 8 July 2020 The law, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993, says that government requirements placing a substantial burden on religious practices are subject to an exceptionally demanding form of judicial scrutiny. Adam Liptak, BostonGlobe.com, "Supreme Court lets employers opt out of birth control coverage," 8 July 2020 Roberts is described as a minimalist judge who seeks to keep judicial changes small. Paul Bedard, Washington Examiner, "Hugs and kisses from Democrats for Justice Roberts after his anti-Trump decisions," 7 July 2020 The Helping Families Initiative has proven successful in Mobile and underway in six judicial districts state wide, including Birmingham. Roy S. Johnson | Rjohnson@al.com, al, "Johnson: Black people, we’ve got work to do -- the killing must stop," 6 July 2020 The two kept in touch, and after a series of high-profile shootings by Black men by police officers in 2016, Moore began lobbying for changes to policing and judicial system. Nancy Armour, USA TODAY, "Opinion: Like Muhammad Ali, Maya Moore was willing to sacrifice her career for what's right," 3 July 2020 Because the law is silent on whether courts must consider a defendant’s ability to pay, DeWine argued, the state’s high court shouldn’t engage in judicial activism and create such a requirement. Jeremy Pelzer, cleveland, "Judges need not consider defendants’ ability to pay when charging them for court costs, Ohio Supreme Court rules," 2 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'judicial.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of judicial

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for judicial

Middle English, from Latin judicialis, from judicium judgment, from judex — see judge entry 2

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Time Traveler for judicial

Time Traveler

The first known use of judicial was in the 14th century

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Statistics for judicial

Last Updated

31 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Judicial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/judicial. Accessed 10 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for judicial

judicial

adjective
How to pronounce judicial (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of judicial

: of or relating to courts of law or judges
: ordered or done by a court
: responsible for dealing with all legal cases involving the government

judicial

adjective
ju·​di·​cial | \ jü-ˈdi-shəl How to pronounce judicial (audio) \

Kids Definition of judicial

1 : of courts or judges the judicial branch
2 : ordered or done by a court judicial review

Other Words from judicial

judicially adverb

judicial

adjective
ju·​di·​cial | \ jü-ˈdi-shəl How to pronounce judicial (audio) \

Legal Definition of judicial

1a : of or relating to a judgment, the function of judging, the administration of justice, or the judiciary
b : of, relating to, or being the branch of government that is charged with trying all cases that involve the government and with the administration of justice within its jurisdiction — compare administrative sense 2, executive sense 1, legislative
2 : created, ordered, or enforced by a court a judicial foreclosure — compare conventional sense 1, legal sense 2c

Other Words from judicial

judicially adverb

History and Etymology for judicial

Latin judicialis, from judicium judgment, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to determine, say

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More from Merriam-Webster on judicial

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with judicial

Spanish Central: Translation of judicial

Nglish: Translation of judicial for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of judicial for Arabic Speakers

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