judicial

adjective

ju·​di·​cial jü-ˈdi-shəl How to pronounce judicial (audio)
1
a
: of or relating to a judgment, the function of judging, the administration of justice, or the judiciary
judicial processes
judicial powers
b
: belonging to the branch of government that is charged with trying all cases that involve the government and with the administration of justice within its jurisdiction compare executive, legislative
2
: ordered or enforced by a court
a judicial sale
3
: belonging or appropriate to a judge or the judiciary
judicial robes
judicial dignity
4
: of, characterized by, or expressing judgment : critical sense 2d
5
: arising from a judgment of God
judicially adverb

Examples of judicial in a Sentence

the judicial branch of government
Recent Examples on the Web During his remarks Tuesday, MPA chief Charlie Rivkin announced a new initiative to work with members of the U.S. Congress to enact judicial site-blocking legislation in the United States (Rivkin has made fighting piracy the hallmark of his tenure). Pamela McClintock, The Hollywood Reporter, 9 Apr. 2024 But for more than a decade, the former president has been enmeshed in a witness-tampering scandal in the country’s judicial system. Samantha Schmidt, Washington Post, 9 Apr. 2024 Breyer sums up textualism and originalism as attempts to make judicial reasoning a science and to make law a list of rules. Louis Menand, The New Yorker, 8 Apr. 2024 Legal experts have warned that government attempts to police the truthfulness of news reports overstep judicial processes and endanger freedom of expression, a constitutional right that has existed since 1948 and weathered decades of military dictatorships. Max Kim, Los Angeles Times, 8 Apr. 2024 The case presents novel legal questions for the judicial system, as Trump is the first current or former president ever to be criminally indicted. Alexander Mallin, ABC News, 8 Apr. 2024 People who are accepted enter a guilty plea and then begin a period of treatment and judicial supervision. William K. Rashbaum, New York Times, 8 Apr. 2024 But while their numbers are growing, the protests have yet to come close to matching the scale of the protests opposing his judicial reform plans before the war. Jeremy Diamond, CNN, 5 Apr. 2024 His lawyers are saying that even using this law against him would require judicial gloss to charge him. Taylor Wilson, USA TODAY, 4 Apr. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'judicial.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Latin judicialis, from judicium judgment, from judex — see judge entry 2

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of judicial was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near judicial

Cite this Entry

“Judicial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/judicial. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

judicial

adjective
ju·​di·​cial ju̇-ˈdish-əl How to pronounce judicial (audio)
1
: of or relating to courts or judges
2
: ordered or enforced by a court
a judicial decision
judicially adverb

Legal Definition

judicial

adjective
ju·​di·​cial jü-ˈdi-shəl How to pronounce judicial (audio)
1
a
: of or relating to a judgment, the function of judging, the administration of justice, or the judiciary
b
: of, relating to, or being the branch of government that is charged with trying all cases that involve the government and with the administration of justice within its jurisdiction compare administrative sense 2, executive sense 1, legislative
2
: created, ordered, or enforced by a court
a judicial foreclosure
compare conventional sense 1, legal sense 2c
judicially adverb
Etymology

Latin judicialis, from judicium judgment, from judic-, judex judge, from jus right, law + dicere to determine, say

More from Merriam-Webster on judicial

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!