judiciary

noun

ju·​di·​cia·​ry jü-ˈdi-shē-ˌer-ē How to pronounce judiciary (audio) -ˈdi-shə-rē How to pronounce judiciary (audio)
1
a
: a system of courts of law
b
: the judges of these courts
2
: a branch of government in which judicial power is vested
judiciary adjective

Examples of judiciary in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Experts on the independence of the judiciary have long argued for appointments rather than direct elections. Nick Corasaniti, New York Times, 20 Feb. 2024 López Obrador has also attacked journalists in hours-long press briefings, has frequently attacked Mexico’s judiciary and claimed judges are part of a conservative conspiracy against his administration. Amaranta Marentes, Fortune, 20 Feb. 2024 Israeli tech companies raised around $10 billion in 2023, roughly half the level of the previous year, amid a global slowdown in fundraising for startups and as the Israeli government’s plans to weaken the judiciary spooked investors. Hanna Ziady, CNN, 19 Feb. 2024 Which is why Alameda County voters should elect Michael Johnson, an attorney and pro tem judge with a long list of professional accomplishments and a deep respect for the ethical canons of the judiciary, to the only court seat on the March 5 ballot. East Bay Times Editorial, The Mercury News, 15 Feb. 2024 Members of the judiciary may have received more than one threat. Robert Legare, CBS News, 14 Feb. 2024 Put simply, people support the court less when politicians attack it, and Trump frequently attacks the judiciary. Jessica A. Schoenherr, The Conversation, 6 Feb. 2024 Like Williams, other political figures and members of the judiciary have been ensnared in swatting incidents in recent weeks — what law enforcement experts say is a product of a hostile political climate during an intense presidential election season. Gabe Gutierrez, NBC News, 1 Feb. 2024 The cause was the Netanyahu government’s attempt to undermine the country’s judiciary. Yair Rosenberg, The Atlantic, 7 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'judiciary.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

judiciary, adjective, from Latin judiciarius judicial, from judicium

First Known Use

1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of judiciary was in 1623

Dictionary Entries Near judiciary

Cite this Entry

“Judiciary.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/judiciary. Accessed 27 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

judiciary

noun
ju·​di·​cia·​ry ju̇-ˈdish-ē-ˌer-ē How to pronounce judiciary (audio) -ˈdish-ə-rē How to pronounce judiciary (audio)
1
a
: a system of courts of law
b
: the judges of these courts
2
: a branch of government in which judicial power is vested
judiciary adjective

Legal Definition

judiciary

noun
ju·​di·​cia·​ry ju̇-ˈdi-shē-ˌer-ē, -ˈdi-shə-rē How to pronounce judiciary (audio)
plural judiciaries
1
a
: a system of courts of law
b
: the judges of these courts
2
: a branch of government in which judicial power is vested compare executive, legislature
judiciary adjective
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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