judiciary

noun
ju·​di·​cia·​ry | \ jü-ˈdi-shē-ˌer-ē, -ˈdi-shə-rē \

Definition of judiciary

1a : a system of courts of law
b : the judges of these courts
2 : a branch of government in which judicial power is vested

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Other Words from judiciary

judiciary adjective

Examples of judiciary in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

There’s the constituent breakfast, followed by a judiciary committee markup. Julia Felsenthal, Vogue, "Personable, Popular, Pragmatic: Is Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar the Democrat’s Secret Weapon?," 15 Jan. 2019 Under pressure, Poland reversed a purge of the judiciary. Jen Kirby, Vox, "The 7 biggest foreign news stories to watch in 2019, from Brexit to North Korea," 24 Dec. 2018 The Kavanaugh battle showed the extent to which the left will engage in smear politics to get their way with the judiciary. Kimberley A. Strassel, WSJ, "The ABA Strikes Back," 29 Nov. 2018 The woman who wrote two books on corruption in the judiciary, the woman who wrote a book on corruption in the military. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Memo from a ‘Facebook nation’ to Mark Zuckerberg: You moved fast and broke our country.," 26 Nov. 2018 Critics say the new system undermines impartiality and could lead to one-man rule with limited checks and balances, especially with a weakened judiciary and parliament. Zeynep Bilginsoy, The Seattle Times, "Erdogan names Cabinet for Turkish presidency with new powers," 9 July 2018 After the Supreme Court handed President Trump a huge victory by upholding his travel ban on Tuesday, the day ended with him losing a separate battle with the judiciary. Margaret Hartmann, Daily Intelligencer, "Judge Orders Trump Administration to Reunite Migrant Families Within 30 Days," 27 June 2018 As an administrative law judge, Kellogg works for the executive branch’s Office of Administrative Hearings and is not affiliated with the Kansas judiciary. Andy Marso, kansascity, "Judge called mom of disabled woman ‘snotty,’ chastised her for exercising a basic right," 23 Jan. 2018 But advocates say there are smaller-bore efforts that could help bring social change, in addition to a focus on ending day-to-day corruption in the police or the judiciary, as opposed to targeting the big drug kingpins. Will Bunch, Philly.com, "The place to save desperate, crying kids isn't the U.S. border. It's Honduras and Guatemala | Will Bunch," 21 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'judiciary.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of judiciary

1623, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for judiciary

judiciary, adjective, from Latin judiciarius judicial, from judicium

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Statistics for judiciary

Last Updated

23 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for judiciary

The first known use of judiciary was in 1623

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More Definitions for judiciary

judiciary

noun
ju·​di·​cia·​ry | \ ju̇-ˈdi-shē-ˌer-ē, -ˈdi-shə-rē \
plural judiciaries

Legal Definition of judiciary

1a : a system of courts of law
b : the judges of these courts
2 : a branch of government in which judicial power is vested — compare executive, legislature

Other Words from judiciary

judiciary adjective

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