accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate | \ ik-ˈse-lə-ˌrāt How to pronounce accelerate (audio) , ak- \
accelerated; accelerating

Definition of accelerate

intransitive verb

1 : to move faster : to gain speed The car slowly accelerated. The pace of change has accelerated in recent months.
2 : to progress from grade to grade more rapidly than usual : to follow a speeded-up educational program

transitive verb

1 : to bring about at an earlier time Circumstances accelerated their departure.
2 : to cause to move faster accelerated his steps also : to cause to undergo acceleration
3a : to hasten the progress or development of accelerate our efforts
b : increase accelerate food production
4a : to enable (a student) to complete a course in less than usual time
b : to speed up (something, such as a course of study)

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Examples of accelerate in a Sentence

She stepped on the gas and the car accelerated. The plane accelerated down the runway. She stepped on the gas and accelerated the car. He says that cutting taxes will help to accelerate economic growth. The rate of economic growth has continued to accelerate.
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Recent Examples on the Web With the pool of infections getting bigger every week, health experts are concerned that colder weather, as well as the holiday season, could further accelerate case growth. Glenn Howatt, Star Tribune, "1,632 new Minnesota COVID-19 infections as case growth outpaces testing," 19 Oct. 2020 The move toward renewable power could accelerate if Joe Biden wins the U.S. presidential election in November, analysts say, as the Democratic nominee has proposed extending tax credits to promote the adoption of green technologies. Tim Mullaney, WSJ, "Investors, Beware: Utility Stocks Could Become Less Predictable," 18 Oct. 2020 Biden’s climate plan would only accelerate that outcome, with massive investments in wind, solar and battery storage giving those energy sources a leg up. Jennifer A Dlouhy, Bloomberg.com, "Biden Won’t Ban Fracking, But His Clean Grid Would Choke Gas," 17 Oct. 2020 For campuses that originally planned to open but then shut down, housing predicaments can accelerate relationships. Washington Post, "College students are still finding romance in a pandemic, through Zoom crushes and actual dates," 13 Oct. 2020 This term that pace of change could accelerate – especially if Judge Barrett is confirmed. Henry Gass, The Christian Science Monitor, "With Amy Coney Barrett, a once-fringe legal philosophy goes mainstream," 6 Oct. 2020 Third don’t accelerate the flight of capital by implementing new overreaching taxes on businesses. Anchorage Daily News, "Candidate Q&A: Alaska House District 27 — Lance Pruitt," 3 Oct. 2020 That money would accelerate construction to a more palatable 15-year timeline. Lillian Reed, baltimoresun.com, "Study of Baltimore County high school buildings calls for $1.2 billion in renovations and expansions, but not rebuilds," 30 Sep. 2020 The pandemic has plunged aviation into its worst ever slump and is expected to accelerate the shift towards renewable forms of energy, as governments use the opportunity to promote a green recovery. Hanna Ziady, CNN, "Airbus wants to build zero-emission planes by 2035. Here's how," 21 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accelerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of accelerate

circa 1522, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for accelerate

borrowed from Latin accelerātus, past participle of accelerāre "to add speed to, hasten the occurrence of, go quickly," from ad- ad- + celerāre "to hasten," verbal derivative of celer "swift, speedy," perhaps going back to *keli-li-/ri-, derivative from the Indo-European base of Greek kélomai, kelésthai "urge, exhort," kelēt-, kélēs "swift horse, charger"

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Learn More about accelerate

Time Traveler for accelerate

Time Traveler

The first known use of accelerate was circa 1522

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Statistics for accelerate

Last Updated

22 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Accelerate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/accelerate. Accessed 22 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for accelerate

accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate | \ ak-ˈse-lə-ˌrāt How to pronounce accelerate (audio) \
accelerated; accelerating

Kids Definition of accelerate

1 : to move or cause to move faster The car accelerated going downhill.
2 : to cause to happen more quickly Using plant food accelerates growth.

accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate | \ ik-ˈsel-ə-ˌrāt, ak- How to pronounce accelerate (audio) \
accelerated; accelerating

Medical Definition of accelerate

transitive verb

: to cause to move faster or speed up accelerated speech and motor activity in manic patients also : to cause to undergo acceleration

intransitive verb

: to move faster : gain speed

accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate
accelerated; accelerating

Legal Definition of accelerate

transitive verb

: to bring about at an earlier time: as
a : to advance (the maturity date of a security agreement) so that payment of the debt in full is due immediately — see also acceleration clause
b : to cause (a future interest in property) to vest by removing the preceding interests (as by failure or premature termination)

intransitive verb

: to enforce an acceleration clause held that the creditor's right to accelerate was suspended— J. J. White and R. S. Summers

Other Words from accelerate

acceleration noun

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Comments on accelerate

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