premise

noun
prem·​ise | \ ˈpre-məs How to pronounce premise (audio) \
variants: or less commonly premiss

Definition of premise

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a proposition antecedently supposed or proved as a basis of argument or inference specifically : either of the first two propositions of a syllogism from which the conclusion is drawn
b : something assumed or taken for granted : presupposition
2 premises also premisses plural : matters previously stated specifically : the preliminary and explanatory part of a deed or of a bill in equity

3 premises also premisses plural [ from its being identified in the premises of the deed ]

a : a tract of land with the buildings thereon
b : a building or part of a building usually with its appurtenances (such as grounds)

premise

verb
pre·​mise | \ ˈpre-məs also pri-ˈmīz How to pronounce premise (audio) \
premised; premising

Definition of premise (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to set forth beforehand as an introduction or a postulate
b : to offer as a premise in an argument
2 : postulate
3 : to base on certain assumptions

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Examples of premise in a Sentence

Noun

Called behavioral ecology, it starts from the premise that social and environmental forces select for various behaviors that optimize people's fitness in a given environment. Different environment, different behaviors—and different human "natures." — Sharon Begley, Newsweek, 29 June 2009 Although the Voting Rights Act served, in some measure, to formalize the notion of racial representation, its consequences undermined its premise—that a transparency of interests existed between the representative and the represented. — Henry Louis Gates, Jr., New Yorker, 24 Oct. 1994 Thirty years ago the modesty of the general expectation was still consistent with the original American premise of self-government. — Lewis H. Lapham, Harper's, November 1992 They were asked to leave the premises. The company leases part of the premises to smaller businesses. The premises were searched by the police. He disagreed with her premise. the basic premises of the argument a theory based on the simple premise that what goes up must come down

Verb

Niebuhr … adhered to a form of liberalism more premised on a realistic assessment of human nature than Rauschenbusch's naïve progressivism was. — Alan Wolfe, New York Times Book Review, 21 Oct. 2007 Fears of a nuclear holocaust were fueled by President Nixon's "madman" theory of diplomacy. The madman theory was premised on the assumption that if the Soviets thought that Nixon was crazy enough to drop the bomb, they would leave us alone. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 & 15 June 2006 let us premise certain things, such as every person's need for love, before beginning our line of reasoning
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The second premise is that climate science is peripheral, not central, to climate politics. David Roberts, Vox, "We might get a climate debate after all. Here are 10 questions to ask candidates.," 3 July 2019 An investigation resulted in the arrest of the suspect for trespassing after previous admonishments not to return to the premises. Rachel Spacek, The Mercury News, "Saratoga crime report for the week of July 12," 3 July 2019 NetApp provides hybrid cloud data services that simplify management of applications and data across cloud and on-premises environments to accelerate digital transformation for companies of all sizes. Fortune, "NetApp," 1 July 2019 There are not any clear premises for the fighting, nor any sense of what may prove lethal or disabling. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, "Review: “Spider-Man: Far from Home” Presents the Illusion of a Good Movie," 1 July 2019 His base might buy the tired premise, but more and more people don’t. Hal Boedeker, orlandosentinel.com, "Trump has himself to blame for negative coverage," 29 June 2019 Kawhi Leonard Rob Mahoney: There are some players effective enough to blot out questions of fit, so talented as to render the premise irrelevant. The Si Staff, SI.com, "Who Should the Lakers Target as Their Third Star?," 28 June 2019 After seeing the store clerk put his hands up, the officers approached the store, prompting the suspects to flee the premises. Dallas News, "Armed robbery suspects nabbed in Irving, Grapevine after pursuit involving four DFW police agencies," 28 June 2019 Super Mario Maker 2 takes an already solid premise and builds on it with new tools and a fantastic story mode and tutorial. Andrew Webster, The Verge, "Super Mario Maker 2 is a great sequel that makes me miss the Wii U," 26 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But Warren’s advisers say her campaign was always premised on the long game. Jess Bidgood, BostonGlobe.com, "As Elizabeth Warren makes gains in the primary, Trumpworld takes notice," 18 June 2019 All of this, however, is premised on Facebook having access to the payment data of its users. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "How Facebook's Libra Will Turbo-Charge Its Ad Empire," 18 June 2019 This piston strategy is premised on the two models being equivalent. Quanta Magazine, "In Quantum Games, There’s No Way to Play the Odds," 1 Apr. 2019 Lawyers for the oil companies have sought to dismiss the suits by San Francisco and Oakland, arguing among other things that they were premised on an overreaching interpretation of public-nuisance law. Miguel Bustillo, WSJ, "Judge Demands More Information from Oil Companies in Climate-Change Suits," 24 May 2018 These aren’t huge percentages, but enough to disrupt Democratic strategies that have been premised for years on overwhelming support among African-Americans. James Freeman, WSJ, "Art of the Deal: 2020," 16 Nov. 2018 Encouraging a movement premised on lies vs. police. Jennifer Hansler, CNN, "Sen. Tammy Duckworth expresses support for protesters in wake of new NFL National Anthem policy," 26 May 2018 And speaking of the FISA court, isn't your whole investigation premised on a fake dossier paid for by Hillary, created by a man who hates Donald Trump and used two con a FISA court judge? Fox News, "Judge Jeanine: I want the Mueller probe to go on and on," 12 Aug. 2018 Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Democracy is premised on the idea that political power is only legitimate when exercised with the consent of the governed. Zack Beauchamp, Vox, "The Wisconsin power grab is part of a bigger Republican attack on democracy," 6 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'premise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of premise

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1526, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for premise

Noun and Verb

in sense 1, from Middle English premisse, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin praemissa, from Latin, feminine of praemissus, past participle of praemittere to place ahead, from prae- pre- + mittere to send; in other senses, from Middle English premisses, from Medieval Latin praemissa, from Latin, neuter plural of praemissus

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Learn More about premise

Dictionary Entries near premise

premineral

premio

premisal

premise

premised on/upon

premit

premium

Statistics for premise

Last Updated

6 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for premise

The first known use of premise was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for premise

premise

noun

English Language Learners Definition of premise

: a building and the area of land that it is on
formal : a statement or idea that is accepted as being true and that is used as the basis of an argument

premise

noun
prem·​ise | \ ˈpre-məs How to pronounce premise (audio) \

Kids Definition of premise

1 : a statement or idea taken to be true and on which an argument or reasoning may be based
2 premises plural : a piece of land with the buildings on it

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Comments on premise

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