grudge

verb
\ ˈgrəj How to pronounce grudge (audio) \
grudged; grudging

Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to be unwilling to give or admit : give or allow reluctantly or resentfully didn't grudge the time

grudge

noun

Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a feeling of deep-seated resentment or ill will held no grudge against those who mistreated him

Other Words from grudge

Verb

grudger noun

Synonyms for grudge

Synonyms: Noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for grudge

Noun

malice, malevolence, ill will, spite, malignity, spleen, grudge mean the desire to see another experience pain, injury, or distress. malice implies a deep-seated often unexplainable desire to see another suffer. felt no malice toward their former enemies malevolence suggests a bitter persistent hatred that is likely to be expressed in malicious conduct. a look of dark malevolence ill will implies a feeling of antipathy of limited duration. ill will provoked by a careless remark spite implies petty feelings of envy and resentment that are often expressed in small harassments. petty insults inspired by spite malignity implies deep passion and relentlessness. a life consumed by motiveless malignity spleen suggests the wrathful release of latent spite or persistent malice. venting his spleen against politicians grudge implies a harbored feeling of resentment or ill will that seeks satisfaction. never one to harbor a grudge

Examples of grudge in a Sentence

Verb I don't grudge paying my share. I don't grudge her the opportunities she has been given. Noun She still has a grudge against him for the way he treated her in school. He has nursed a grudge against his former boss for years. I don't bear him any grudges.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Their party was more likely to eschew deadly and costly violence in favor of grudging compromise and coexistence. Caitlin Fitz, The Atlantic, 8 Apr. 2020 Corbyn, meanwhile, began to win grudging praise from the guardians of established opinion for his willingness to coordinate the resistance. David Graeber, The New York Review of Books, 13 Jan. 2020 Summing up, Nixon called for the Chinese to be bold and not grudging. William Mcgurn, WSJ, 26 Nov. 2018 Instant coffee, often relegated to brownie recipes and steak rubs, is making a comeback and even winning grudging approval from connoisseurs. Los Angeles Times, 7 Sep. 2019 And finally, a grudging first welcome to … the new pass interference rule in the regular season. Jonathan Jones, SI.com, 5 Sep. 2019 Smith presents a more modulated relationship of mutual if often grudging esteem and uneasy collaboration toward common objectives. Jean Edward Smith, Washington Post, 22 Aug. 2019 After initial hesitation, President Obama declared that Assad must go, but without lending more than grudging assistance to rebel groups fighting to achieve that outcome. Brian Stewart, National Review, 10 Aug. 2019 But while there is some comic nature to booing and jeers aimed at Smith, there is also grudging respect. James Masters, CNN, 11 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This year, the Big Game was the Big Draw as the Cal Bears and Stanford Cardinal played their annual grudge match before actual fans — a stark departure from last year’s empty stadium at the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Lauren Hernández, San Francisco Chronicle, 20 Nov. 2021 The regular-season double overtime thriller had nothing on the mid-November playoff grudge match, the 51st meeting of the Akron-area Catholic school rivals. Jonathan X. Simmons, cleveland, 19 Nov. 2021 That actually includes the annual grudge match between Michigan football and Michigan State football; the Spartans have won 10 of the past 14, cutting the Wolverines’ edge to … 33 games (71-38-5). Ryan Ford, Detroit Free Press, 6 Nov. 2021 Henderson also held a grudge against his father-in-law, Kristin's father, because the father-in-law took Kristin in to live with him in his New Market home when the couple began having problems while throwing Henderson out, Gann says. Christine Pelisek, PEOPLE.com, 29 Oct. 2021 Georgia now gets set for rival Florida, in a grudge match that could turn ugly for the Gators. Paul Myerberg, USA TODAY, 25 Oct. 2021 Lauren Lide, 26, reportedly held a grudge against the flight-training company. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, 15 Oct. 2021 Meanwhile, an old acquaintance who still carries a grudge has just arrived in Arizona as well. oregonlive, 30 Oct. 2021 Except for one: Calvin Evans; the lonely, brilliant, Nobel-prize nominated grudge-holder who falls in love with—of all things—her mind. Seija Rankin, EW.com, 20 Oct. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'grudge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of grudge

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for grudge

Verb

Middle English grucchen, grudgen to grumble, complain, from Anglo-French grucer, grucher, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German grogezen to howl

Noun

derivative of grudge entry 1

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Time Traveler for grudge

Time Traveler

The first known use of grudge was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near grudge

grubworm

grudge

grudgeful

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Statistics for grudge

Cite this Entry

“Grudge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/grudge. Accessed 4 Dec. 2021.

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More Definitions for grudge

grudge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to give, do, or allow (something) in a reluctant or unwilling way : begrudge
: to dislike or feel angry toward (someone) for something

grudge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of anger toward someone that lasts for a long time

grudge

verb
\ ˈgrəj How to pronounce grudge (audio) \
grudged; grudging

Kids Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

grudge

noun

Kids Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a feeling of anger or dislike towards someone usually that lasts a long time She's held a grudge against me since kindergarten. …Lester welcomed us kids back onto his bus without a grudge— Ingrid Law, Savvy

More from Merriam-Webster on grudge

Nglish: Translation of grudge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of grudge for Arabic Speakers

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