grudge

verb
\ ˈgrəj How to pronounce grudge (audio) \
grudged; grudging

Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to be unwilling to give or admit : give or allow reluctantly or resentfully didn't grudge the time

grudge

noun

Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a feeling of deep-seated resentment or ill will held no grudge against those who mistreated him

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from grudge

Verb

grudger noun

Synonyms for grudge

Synonyms: Noun

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Choose the Right Synonym for grudge

Noun

malice, malevolence, ill will, spite, malignity, spleen, grudge mean the desire to see another experience pain, injury, or distress. malice implies a deep-seated often unexplainable desire to see another suffer. felt no malice toward their former enemies malevolence suggests a bitter persistent hatred that is likely to be expressed in malicious conduct. a look of dark malevolence ill will implies a feeling of antipathy of limited duration. ill will provoked by a careless remark spite implies petty feelings of envy and resentment that are often expressed in small harassments. petty insults inspired by spite malignity implies deep passion and relentlessness. a life consumed by motiveless malignity spleen suggests the wrathful release of latent spite or persistent malice. venting his spleen against politicians grudge implies a harbored feeling of resentment or ill will that seeks satisfaction. never one to harbor a grudge

Examples of grudge in a Sentence

Verb I don't grudge paying my share. I don't grudge her the opportunities she has been given. Noun She still has a grudge against him for the way he treated her in school. He has nursed a grudge against his former boss for years. I don't bear him any grudges.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Their party was more likely to eschew deadly and costly violence in favor of grudging compromise and coexistence. Caitlin Fitz, The Atlantic, "Conquerors Armed With Spreadsheets," 8 Apr. 2020 Corbyn, meanwhile, began to win grudging praise from the guardians of established opinion for his willingness to coordinate the resistance. David Graeber, The New York Review of Books, "The Center Blows Itself Up: Care and Spite in the ‘Brexit Election’," 13 Jan. 2020 Summing up, Nixon called for the Chinese to be bold and not grudging. William Mcgurn, WSJ, "Nixon, Now More Than Ever," 26 Nov. 2018 Instant coffee, often relegated to brownie recipes and steak rubs, is making a comeback and even winning grudging approval from connoisseurs. Los Angeles Times, "Instant coffee is back, and snobs are paying $3.25 a cup," 7 Sep. 2019 And finally, a grudging first welcome to … the new pass interference rule in the regular season. Jonathan Jones, SI.com, "Welcome Back, NFL!," 5 Sep. 2019 Smith presents a more modulated relationship of mutual if often grudging esteem and uneasy collaboration toward common objectives. Jean Edward Smith, Washington Post, "The Allies who liberated Paris, and the Nazi who saved it," 22 Aug. 2019 After initial hesitation, President Obama declared that Assad must go, but without lending more than grudging assistance to rebel groups fighting to achieve that outcome. Brian Stewart, National Review, "For Sama: A Chronicle of the Syrian Tragedy," 10 Aug. 2019 But while there is some comic nature to booing and jeers aimed at Smith, there is also grudging respect. James Masters, CNN, "Australia vs. England: England ends 27-year wait to reach World Cup final," 11 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Ohio State, holding no grudge about the way the first recruitment fell apart, decided to bring him back. Nathan Baird, cleveland, "Ohio State football’s Antwuan Jackson has pivotal role in final season of his second chance with Buckeyes," 8 Oct. 2020 Both the Bulldogs and Gators are likely to stay at near the top of the Amway Coaches Poll before their grudge match in Jacksonville with the winner in position to reach the SEC title game. Erick Smith, USA TODAY, "Bowl projections: Florida remains ahead of Georgia in the College Football Playoff race," 6 Oct. 2020 In an earlier episode Negan had infiltrated the group and used that access to kill its leader Alpha (Samantha Morton), setting the stage for the grudge match. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'The Walking Dead' finale closed the Whisperers chapter, starting the beginning of the end," 5 Oct. 2020 The woman who shot three people at YouTube in April 2018 proved there were people out there with a grudge against tech. David Streitfeld, New York Times, "Inside eBay’s Cockroach Cult: The Ghastly Story of a Stalking Scandal," 26 Sep. 2020 Brown and his Tigers teammates will host rival Trinity at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the schools’ annual grudge match. Jason Frakes, The Courier-Journal, "St. Xavier lineman Evan Brown excited to continue Kentucky pipeline to Navy football team," 23 Sep. 2020 Sometimes a politician needs to hold a grudge to enforce norms and protect his or her dignity and the power to get things done. Holman W. Jenkins, WSJ, "The Last Race Card?," 21 Aug. 2020 When the 1988 convention rolled into Atlanta with Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis as the presumptive nominee, Biden's home state delegation still bore a grudge. Bo Erickson, CBS News, "Highlights from Joe Biden's almost 50 years at Democratic conventions. He's now center stage.," 18 Aug. 2020 But Biden, unlike the current White House occupant, doesn’t hold a grudge. Star Tribune, "Still much on the line for online conventions," 14 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'grudge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of grudge

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for grudge

Verb and Noun

Middle English grucchen, grudgen to grumble, complain, from Anglo-French grucer, grucher, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German grogezen to howl

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about grudge

Time Traveler for grudge

Time Traveler

The first known use of grudge was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for grudge

Cite this Entry

“Grudge.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/grudge. Accessed 30 Oct. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for grudge

grudge

verb
How to pronounce grudge (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to give, do, or allow (something) in a reluctant or unwilling way
: to dislike or feel angry toward (someone) for something

grudge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of anger toward someone that lasts for a long time

grudge

verb
\ ˈgrəj How to pronounce grudge (audio) \
grudged; grudging

Kids Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

grudge

noun

Kids Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a feeling of anger or dislike towards someone usually that lasts a long time She's held a grudge against me since kindergarten. …Lester welcomed us kids back onto his bus without a grudge— Ingrid Law, Savvy

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on grudge

What made you want to look up grudge? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Here Be Dragons: A Creature Identification Quiz

  • monster werewolf photo
  • Which is a synonym of werewolf?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!