grudge

verb
\ ˈgrəj How to pronounce grudge (audio) \
grudged; grudging

Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

: to be unwilling to give or admit : give or allow reluctantly or resentfully didn't grudge the time

grudge

noun

Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a feeling of deep-seated resentment or ill will held no grudge against those who mistreated him

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Other Words from grudge

Verb

grudger noun

Synonyms for grudge

Synonyms: Noun

down [chiefly British], grievance, resentment, score

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Choose the Right Synonym for grudge

Noun

malice, malevolence, ill will, spite, malignity, spleen, grudge mean the desire to see another experience pain, injury, or distress. malice implies a deep-seated often unexplainable desire to see another suffer. felt no malice toward their former enemies malevolence suggests a bitter persistent hatred that is likely to be expressed in malicious conduct. a look of dark malevolence ill will implies a feeling of antipathy of limited duration. ill will provoked by a careless remark spite implies petty feelings of envy and resentment that are often expressed in small harassments. petty insults inspired by spite malignity implies deep passion and relentlessness. a life consumed by motiveless malignity spleen suggests the wrathful release of latent spite or persistent malice. venting his spleen against politicians grudge implies a harbored feeling of resentment or ill will that seeks satisfaction. never one to harbor a grudge

Examples of grudge in a Sentence

Verb

I don't grudge paying my share. I don't grudge her the opportunities she has been given.

Noun

She still has a grudge against him for the way he treated her in school. He has nursed a grudge against his former boss for years. I don't bear him any grudges.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Instant coffee, often relegated to brownie recipes and steak rubs, is making a comeback and even winning grudging approval from connoisseurs. Los Angeles Times, "Instant coffee is back, and snobs are paying $3.25 a cup," 7 Sep. 2019 And finally, a grudging first welcome to … the new pass interference rule in the regular season. Jonathan Jones, SI.com, "Welcome Back, NFL!," 5 Sep. 2019 Smith presents a more modulated relationship of mutual if often grudging esteem and uneasy collaboration toward common objectives. Jean Edward Smith, Washington Post, "The Allies who liberated Paris, and the Nazi who saved it," 22 Aug. 2019 After initial hesitation, President Obama declared that Assad must go, but without lending more than grudging assistance to rebel groups fighting to achieve that outcome. Brian Stewart, National Review, "For Sama: A Chronicle of the Syrian Tragedy," 10 Aug. 2019 But while there is some comic nature to booing and jeers aimed at Smith, there is also grudging respect. James Masters, CNN, "Australia vs. England: England ends 27-year wait to reach World Cup final," 11 July 2019 Other critics also gave Trump high marks, though some were grudging. John Fritze, USA TODAY, "'He can be a statesman': Trump's Normandy speech well-received by critics, Scarborough says, 'I hope he means it'," 6 June 2019 No reasonable person grudges Pakistanis their right to revere Muhammad. Sadanand Dhume, WSJ, "Pakistani Prior Restraint in Holland," 6 Sep. 2018 Still, the chaos in surrounding states seem to resign most Saudis to grudging patience with their prince. Karen Elliott House, WSJ, "Where Is Crown Prince Mohammed?," 11 Feb. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Trump has foolishly decided to act as his own exclusive spokesman, putting all his prejudices, misconceptions, resentments, insecurities, grudges and fears on ugly display. Eugene Robinson, The Mercury News, "Robinson: The unhinged presidency," 25 Aug. 2019 Dad was selfless, generous and caring and was a man who had no hidden agenda, ego or grudge. courant.com, "Emanuel Shluger," 30 July 2019 The political pull resurfaced in September 2018, fueled by an old grudge and the funeral of the late Sen. John McCain. Alden Woods, azcentral, "More cake, less scandal (and no UFOs): Ex-Gov. Fife Symington is still looking for his legacy," 7 July 2019 Tim Rohan picks Miami: This game features a grudge match between two coaches with history. The Si Staff, SI.com, "College Football Week 2 Picks: LSU-Texas, Clemson-Texas A&M and More," 5 Sep. 2019 That means that Dershowitz, the 80-year-old, and Boies, the 78-year-old, will tangle again as the elder party in the grudge match tries to get the younger one’s law firm barred from representing Giuffre in the defamation suit against Dershowitz. Tom Jackman, Washington Post, "It’s Alan Dershowitz vs. David Boies, again and again," 13 Aug. 2019 Jim Denomie has every right to hold a grudge against his high school counselor. Kathy Berdan, Twin Cities, "Scandia artist Jim Denomie is 2019 McKnight Distinguished Artist — though he was once advised against art as a career," 29 Aug. 2019 Ever since then, the union has treated the vehicle as a pariah and symbol of long-festering grudges against the automaker’s off-shoring strategy. David Welch, Los Angeles Times, "GM’s Mexico-made Chevy Blazer becomes a political pariah for auto workers," 1 Aug. 2019 The meeting started in a rather awkward way with a sense of old grudges still hanging in the air. Rong Xiaoqing, National Review, "The Rise of the Chinese-American Right," 17 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'grudge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of grudge

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for grudge

Verb and Noun

Middle English grucchen, grudgen to grumble, complain, from Anglo-French grucer, grucher, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German grogezen to howl

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Statistics for grudge

Last Updated

22 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for grudge

The first known use of grudge was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for grudge

grudge

verb

English Language Learners Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to give, do, or allow (something) in a reluctant or unwilling way
: to dislike or feel angry toward (someone) for something

grudge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong feeling of anger toward someone that lasts for a long time

grudge

verb
\ ˈgrəj How to pronounce grudge (audio) \
grudged; grudging

Kids Definition of grudge

 (Entry 1 of 2)

grudge

noun

Kids Definition of grudge (Entry 2 of 2)

: a feeling of anger or dislike towards someone usually that lasts a long time She's held a grudge against me since kindergarten. …Lester welcomed us kids back onto his bus without a grudge— Ingrid Law, Savvy

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More from Merriam-Webster on grudge

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with grudge

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for grudge

Spanish Central: Translation of grudge

Nglish: Translation of grudge for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of grudge for Arabic Speakers

Comments on grudge

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