deduce

verb
de·​duce | \ di-ˈdüs How to pronounce deduce (audio) , dē-; chiefly British -ˈdyüs \
deduced; deducing

Definition of deduce

transitive verb

1 : to determine by reasoning or deduction deduce the age of ancient artifacts She deduced, from the fur stuck to his clothes, that he owned a cat. specifically, philosophy : to infer (see infer sense 1) from a general principle
2 : to trace the course of deduce their lineage

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Other Words from deduce

deducible \ di-​ˈd(y)ü-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce deducible (audio) , dē-​ \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for deduce

infer, deduce, conclude, judge, gather mean to arrive at a mental conclusion. infer implies arriving at a conclusion by reasoning from evidence; if the evidence is slight, the term comes close to surmise. from that remark, I inferred that they knew each other deduce often adds to infer the special implication of drawing a particular inference from a generalization. denied we could deduce anything important from human mortality conclude implies arriving at a necessary inference at the end of a chain of reasoning. concluded that only the accused could be guilty judge stresses a weighing of the evidence on which a conclusion is based. judge people by their actions gather suggests an intuitive forming of a conclusion from implications. gathered their desire to be alone without a word

Frequently Asked Questions About deduce

What is the difference between deduction and induction?

Deductive reasoning, or deduction, is making an inference based on widely accepted facts or premises. If a beverage is defined as "drinkable through a straw," one could use deduction to determine soup to be a beverage. Inductive reasoning, or induction, is making an inference based on an observation, often of a sample. You can induce that the soup is tasty if you observe all of your friends consuming it. Read more on the difference between deduction and induction

What is the difference between abduction and deduction?

Abductive reasoning, or abduction, is making a probable conclusion from what you know. If you see an abandoned bowl of hot soup on the table, you can use abduction to conclude the owner of the soup is likely returning soon. Deductive reasoning, or deduction, is making an inference based on widely accepted facts or premises. If a meal is described as "eaten with a fork" you may use deduction to determine that it is solid food, rather than, say, a bowl of soup.

What is the difference between deduction and adduction?

Adduction is "the action of drawing (something, such as a limb) toward or past the median axis of the body," and "the bringing together of similar parts." Deduction may be "an act of taking away," or "something that is subtracted." Both words may be traced in part to the Latin dūcere, meaning "to lead."

Examples of deduce in a Sentence

I can deduce from the simple observation of your behavior that you're trying to hide something from me.
Recent Examples on the Web Serologic surveys are a tool epidemiologists can use to deduce how many people have really contracted the virus, including people who never felt sick or who did but were never able to get a diagnostic test. Tim Mcdonnell, Quartz, "Covid-19 cases may be undercounted by 50-fold in LA County, antibody surveys show," 20 Apr. 2020 The reporters at the Times use their standards and perspectives, the 2019 models, to deduce, interpret, and judge what people thought and did hundreds of years ago. Brian T. Allen, National Review, "To the 1619 Project: Use More Art, Less Fake History," 25 Jan. 2020 He and a lab supervisor directed light at the side of the tube and then at the surface of the bubble and used the reflected rays of light to deduce the thickness of the film. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, "College Student Solves 100-Year-Old Physics Problem," 2 Dec. 2019 Pohl followed the same logic to deduce the proton radius from the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen in 2010. Quanta Magazine, "Physicists Finally Nail the Proton’s Size, and Hope Dies," 11 Sep. 2019 At times, callers deduce from rowdy background noise that Mr. Biden is working beside his German shepherds, Major and Champ. Alexander Burns, New York Times, "A Candidate in Isolation: Inside Joe Biden’s Cloistered Campaign," 25 Apr. 2020 From this, Frankel deduced that there must have been a quid pro quo: Russian election assistance in exchange for a more favorable foreign policy toward Russia that would include sanctions relief. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, "Trump’s Curious Libel Lawsuit against the New York Times," 28 Feb. 2020 Caldwell-Harris deduces this is because the foreign-language participants did not feel the emotions that would censor them from doing the unethical thing. Galadriel Watson, Washington Post, "Bilingual people may make different choices based on the language they’re thinking in. Here’s why.," 19 Feb. 2020 After more research and further analysis of the distress signal, Barnette and his team deduced that Bear Wreck was in fact the Cotopaxi. Daisy Hernandez, Popular Mechanics, "This 95-Year-Old Ghost Ship Has Been Hiding In Plain Sight," 30 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deduce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deduce

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deduce

Middle English, from Latin deducere, literally, to lead away, from de- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Time Traveler for deduce

Time Traveler

The first known use of deduce was in the 15th century

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Statistics for deduce

Last Updated

1 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Deduce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deduce. Accessed 5 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for deduce

deduce

verb
How to pronounce deduce (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of deduce

formal : to use logic or reason to form (a conclusion or opinion about something) : to decide (something) after thinking about the known facts

deduce

verb
de·​duce | \ di-ˈdüs How to pronounce deduce (audio) , -ˈdyüs \
deduced; deducing

Kids Definition of deduce

: to figure out by using reason or logic What can we deduce from the evidence?

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More from Merriam-Webster on deduce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deduce

Spanish Central: Translation of deduce

Nglish: Translation of deduce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deduce for Arabic Speakers

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