deduce

verb
de·duce | \ di-ˈdüs , dē- ; chiefly British -ˈdyüs \
deduced; deducing

Definition of deduce 

transitive verb

1 : to determine by reasoning or deduction deduce the age of ancient artifacts She deduced, from the fur stuck to his clothes, that he owned a cat. specifically, philosophy : to infer (see infer sense 1) from a general principle

2 : to trace the course of deduce their lineage

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Other words from deduce

deducible \-ˈd(y)ü-sə-bəl \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for deduce

infer, deduce, conclude, judge, gather mean to arrive at a mental conclusion. infer implies arriving at a conclusion by reasoning from evidence; if the evidence is slight, the term comes close to surmise. from that remark, I inferred that they knew each other deduce often adds to infer the special implication of drawing a particular inference from a generalization. denied we could deduce anything important from human mortality conclude implies arriving at a necessary inference at the end of a chain of reasoning. concluded that only the accused could be guilty judge stresses a weighing of the evidence on which a conclusion is based. judge people by their actions gather suggests an intuitive forming of a conclusion from implications. gathered their desire to be alone without a word

Examples of deduce in a Sentence

I can deduce from the simple observation of your behavior that you're trying to hide something from me.

Recent Examples on the Web

It's deduced that Davidson and Grande may have received these new finger tattoos together. Samantha Sasso, refinery29.com, "Tattoos Unlock The Mystery Of Ariana Grande & Pete Davidson's Relationship," 9 July 2018 Estimates about the holdings are deduced from orders placed by depository institutions, subsequent reports to the Fed’s Board of Governors and what can be discerned based on denominations in circulation. Jo Craven Mcginty, WSJ, "Cash Flow or Cash Stash? How Money Moves Around," 6 July 2018 The film never utters the word, but given the year and the general atmosphere of fear, the audience is given just enough to deduce the cause of Frida’s mother’s death. Barbara Vandenburgh, azcentral, "'Summer 1993' sees the world through the eyes of a child," 14 June 2018 Marine scientists at China’s Guangxi Key Laboratory recently deduced the strength of East Asian winter monsoons over the past 150 years by measuring levels of rare earth elements, such as lanthanum and cerium, in each layer of a Poritescoral core. Elizabeth Svoboda, Scientific American, "Cores from Coral Reefs Hold Secrets of the Seas’ Past and Future," 6 June 2018 If your math skills are solid, you’ve already deduced that left the Cowgirls’ with an 11-13 record heading into Friday’s game. Roy Bragg, San Antonio Express-News, "Mustangs buck Cowgirls out of the playoffs," 1 June 2018 Lauren deduced the reviewer’s identity almost immediately; the former client gave himself away with the same dialectical misspellings that littered previous negative reviews on other review websites. Rick Paulas, Longreads, "Sex Workers vs. The Internet," 15 June 2018 And ESA’s Characterizing Exoplanets Satellite (CHEOPS) will measure the diameters of alien planets whose masses are already known, allowing their approximate composition (rocky versus gaseous) to be deduced. Mike Wall, Scientific American, "European Space Agency Picks Exoplanet-Studying Spacecraft for 2028 Launch," 21 Mar. 2018 The script has never been taken particularly seriously — not even by Shakespeare scholars, who deduced that the bard had likely not even written its first two acts. Christopher Arnott, courant.com, "Outdoor Shakespeare This Summer: 'Pericles,' 'Love's Labour's Lost,' 'Hamlet' And...," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deduce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deduce

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deduce

Middle English, from Latin deducere, literally, to lead away, from de- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Dictionary Entries near deduce

dedition

dedolent

de dolo

deduce

deducement

deducibility

deduct

Statistics for deduce

Last Updated

25 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for deduce

The first known use of deduce was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for deduce

deduce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of deduce

: to use logic or reason to form (a conclusion or opinion about something) : to decide (something) after thinking about the known facts

deduce

verb
de·duce | \ di-ˈdüs , -ˈdyüs \
deduced; deducing

Kids Definition of deduce

: to figure out by using reason or logic What can we deduce from the evidence?

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More from Merriam-Webster on deduce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for deduce

Spanish Central: Translation of deduce

Nglish: Translation of deduce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of deduce for Arabic Speakers

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