deduce

verb
de·​duce | \ di-ˈdüs How to pronounce deduce (audio) , dē-; chiefly British -ˈdyüs \
deduced; deducing

Definition of deduce

transitive verb

1 : to determine by reasoning or deduction deduce the age of ancient artifacts She deduced, from the fur stuck to his clothes, that he owned a cat. specifically, philosophy : to infer (see infer sense 1) from a general principle
2 : to trace the course of deduce their lineage

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Other Words from deduce

deducible \ di-​ˈd(y)ü-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce deduce (audio) , dē-​ \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for deduce

infer, deduce, conclude, judge, gather mean to arrive at a mental conclusion. infer implies arriving at a conclusion by reasoning from evidence; if the evidence is slight, the term comes close to surmise. from that remark, I inferred that they knew each other deduce often adds to infer the special implication of drawing a particular inference from a generalization. denied we could deduce anything important from human mortality conclude implies arriving at a necessary inference at the end of a chain of reasoning. concluded that only the accused could be guilty judge stresses a weighing of the evidence on which a conclusion is based. judge people by their actions gather suggests an intuitive forming of a conclusion from implications. gathered their desire to be alone without a word

Frequently Asked Questions About deduce

What is the difference between deduction and induction?

Deductive reasoning, or deduction, is making an inference based on widely accepted facts or premises. If a beverage is defined as "drinkable through a straw," one could use deduction to determine soup to be a beverage. Inductive reasoning, or induction, is making an inference based on an observation, often of a sample. You can induce that the soup is tasty if you observe all of your friends consuming it. Read more on the difference between deduction and induction

What is the difference between abduction and deduction?

Abductive reasoning, or abduction, is making a probable conclusion from what you know. If you see an abandoned bowl of hot soup on the table, you can use abduction to conclude the owner of the soup is likely returning soon. Deductive reasoning, or deduction, is making an inference based on widely accepted facts or premises. If a meal is described as "eaten with a fork" you may use deduction to determine that it is solid food, rather than, say, a bowl of soup.

What is the difference between deduction and adduction?

Adduction is "the action of drawing (something, such as a limb) toward or past the median axis of the body," and "the bringing together of similar parts." Deduction may be "an act of taking away," or "something that is subtracted." Both words may be traced in part to the Latin dūcere, meaning "to lead."

Examples of deduce in a Sentence

I can deduce from the simple observation of your behavior that you're trying to hide something from me.
Recent Examples on the Web Based on studies of natural immunity, experts can deduce that protection will last at least six to eight months. Chronicle Advice Team, San Francisco Chronicle, "Can I switch to a different COVID vaccine brand if booster shots are needed?," 7 May 2021 In other words, if the bus number were 13, Wizard B could not deduce the age of Wizard A from his negative answer because his age could be 36 or 48. Jean-paul Delahaye, Scientific American, "For Math Fans: Some Puzzles from Game of Life Creator John Conway," 28 Apr. 2021 For three to five rounds, your team's goal is to carry out missions while each player tries to deduce other players’ identities. Isabelle Kagan, USA TODAY, "10 board games and game night activities that are actually fun," 7 Apr. 2021 Whereas Deep Blue took down Kasparov via sheer computing power, newer computer technologies actually learn and deduce solutions on their own. Bret Stetka, Scientific American, "“Superhuman” AI Triumphs Playing the Toughest Board Games," 6 Dec. 2018 Privacy activists such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation have claimed otherwise, warning that FLoC would still allow third parties to deduce an individual's interests. David Meyer, Fortune, "Google beefs up privacy promises as it prepares to upend its ad model," 3 Mar. 2021 As numerous social-media users (as well as this writer) were able to deduce last night despite being wine drunk, Martin’s distinctive profile and backside were included in numerous panoramic shots of the studio. Devon Ivie, Vulture, "Heather Martin Is The Bachelor’s Kyle Mooney," 2 Mar. 2021 The recording was then played in the open gallery, leaving visitors to deduce his actions from sound alone: footsteps, impact and slowing pace. Roberta Smith, New York Times, "Barry Le Va, Whose Floor-Bound Art Defied Boundaries, Dies at 79," 22 Feb. 2021 Alcindor was able to deduce all that after the first day of Biden’s presidency! Isaac Schorr, National Review, "Jen Psaki Is Living Her Best Life," 25 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deduce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deduce

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for deduce

Middle English, from Latin deducere, literally, to lead away, from de- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Time Traveler for deduce

Time Traveler

The first known use of deduce was in the 15th century

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Statistics for deduce

Last Updated

11 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Deduce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deduce. Accessed 18 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for deduce

deduce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of deduce

formal : to use logic or reason to form (a conclusion or opinion about something) : to decide (something) after thinking about the known facts

deduce

verb
de·​duce | \ di-ˈdüs How to pronounce deduce (audio) , -ˈdyüs \
deduced; deducing

Kids Definition of deduce

: to figure out by using reason or logic What can we deduce from the evidence?

Comments on deduce

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