derive

verb
de·​rive | \ di-ˈrīv , dē-\
derived; deriving

Definition of derive

transitive verb

1a : to take, receive, or obtain especially from a specified source is said to derive its name from a Native American word meaning "wild onion"
b chemistry : to obtain (a chemical substance) actually or theoretically from a parent substance Petroleum is derived from coal tar.
2 : infer, deduce what was derived from their observations
3 archaic : bring … inconvenience that will be derived to them from stopping all imports …— Thomas Jefferson
4 : to trace the derivation of We can derive the word "chauffeur" from French.

intransitive verb

: to have or take origin : come as a derivative The novel's appeal derives entirely from the complexity of its characters.

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Other Words from derive

deriver noun

Choose the Right Synonym for derive

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of derive in a Sentence

The river derives its name from a Native American tribe. Much of the book's appeal derives from the personality of its central character.

Recent Examples on the Web

Acura is one of the more recent entrants into the GT3 scene, launching its NSX GT3 (derived from its NSX supercar) in 2016. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "Open mind, wide open throttle: We go to our first NASCAR race," 15 Nov. 2018 They are called chemotropic organisms, because the lifeform's growth is influenced by some sort of external chemical stimuli (a phototroph, meanwhile, lives on the surface and derives chemical energy from sunlight). Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "What Would Life on Mars Be Like?," 25 July 2018 For a guy whose derives much of his value from his ability to keep opposing ballhandlers in front of him — i.e., his lateral quickness — the injuries are worthy of consideration. David Murphy, Philly.com, "LeBron James or not, Sixers will have to fill these two needs | David Murphy," 6 June 2018 McLeod was arrested Friday in Maine on human trafficking and deriving support from prostitution charges, and is awaiting extradition. Chris Harris, PEOPLE.com, "Teen Allegedly Strangled Friend Who Was Found Topless in Hotel Room, Bound With Phone Cords," 1 May 2018 But scientists around the world are increasingly deploying treatments derived from stem cells, placing them in patients’ eyes in hopes of regenerating the lost tissue. Andrew Joseph, STAT, "Early trials of stem-cell therapies hint at potential to restore some vision," 25 Apr. 2018 This unconfirmed rumor started after sources told websites that the Bronx native refrained from drinking alcohol at the Super Bowl (her nickname, Cardi B, is literally derived from her love of Barcardi rum). Morgan Baila, refinery29.com, "If Cardi B Is Pregnant, What Does It Mean For Coachella?," 15 Mar. 2018 Time and critical opinion have been much kinder to this family melodrama—derived, like its successors in the Apu trilogy, Aparajito and The World of Apu, from a 30s novel by Bibhutibhusan Banerjee—than to Truffaut's remark. Patrick Friel, Chicago Reader, "Books / Film / Poverty / Television This Week on Filmstruck: Films about Hard Times," 2 Feb. 2018 Hemp is derived from the same plant as marijuana (Cannabis sativa) but uses strains low in the psychoactive compound THC. Kacy Burdette, Fortune, "How Red States Politicians Are Reviving Hemp," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'derive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of derive

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for derive

Middle English, from Anglo-French deriver, from Latin derivare, literally, to draw off (water), from de- + rivus stream — more at run

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Statistics for derive

Last Updated

4 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for derive

The first known use of derive was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for derive

derive

verb

English Language Learners Definition of derive

: to take or get (something) from (something else)
: to have something as a source : to come from something

derive

verb
de·​rive | \ di-ˈrīv \
derived; deriving

Kids Definition of derive

1 : to take or get from a source I derive great pleasure from reading.
2 : to come from a certain source Some modern holidays derive from ancient traditions.
3 : to trace the origin or source of We derive the word “cherry” from a French word.

derive

verb
de·​rive | \ di-ˈrīv \
derived; deriving

Medical Definition of derive

transitive verb

: to take, receive, or obtain, especially from a specified source specifically : to obtain (a chemical substance) actually or theoretically from a parent substance

intransitive verb

: to have or take origin

Other Words from derive

derivation \ ˌder-​ə-​ˈvā-​shən \ noun

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More from Merriam-Webster on derive

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with derive

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for derive

Spanish Central: Translation of derive

Nglish: Translation of derive for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of derive for Arabic Speakers

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