emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web This seasonal variation is natural, but if climate change increases the noise emanating from warming icebergs, whales may have to raise their voices even higher in the summer. Emily Anthes, New York Times, "The Sound of One Shrimp Snapping," 21 Apr. 2020 With the misinformation emanating from the Trump White House, the need for reliable, widely-accessible information and facts is more urgent than ever. Michael Luo, The New Yorker, "The Fate of the News in the Age of the Coronavirus," 29 Mar. 2020 Except that dad, judging by the noises emanating from son London and daughter Layla, is not playing nice: Layla also knows how to use her elbow to establish position. Elaine Sung, Detroit Free Press, "See Detroit Pistons' Derrick Rose play defense against his kids in a playhouse," 17 Mar. 2020 How bad must her life be to, like, emanate such hatred toward everyone? Lauren Groff, The Atlantic, "Birdie," 14 Jan. 2020 The Serbs were identified as the weakest side in the pool - something their fourth-place finish confirmed - yet a ferocious performance and the wall of noise emanating from the stands left the Reds staring down the barrel. SI.com, "Champions League: Ranking the 8 Scariest Groups of Death in the Competition's History," 29 Aug. 2019 The Nasdaq Composite index entered correction territory on Monday when several of its most influential stocks, especially Google, fell sharply because of noises emanating from Washington about possible antitrust action. Allan Sloan, Washington Post, "Instead of ranting about market’s ‘mistake,’ let me issue a warning about ‘correction’," 7 June 2019 The results, published in a paper in Scientific Reports in May 2019, reveal wild pigs have spread extensively over the past three decades, with sightings emanating outward from former boar farms. National Geographic, "THE BEST OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX," 3 Apr. 2020 Health care became expensive for various intersecting reasons, mainly emanating from wide-ranging and favorable regulations. Robin Kaiser-schatzlein, The New Republic, "Why Deaths of Despair Are Rising," 10 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Time Traveler for emanate

Time Traveler

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

21 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Emanate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emanate. Accessed 29 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb
How to pronounce emanate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source
: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.
2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

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More from Merriam-Webster on emanate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for emanate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with emanate

Spanish Central: Translation of emanate

Nglish: Translation of emanate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of emanate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on emanate

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