emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web In the concept art, two vertical lines emanate from the aircraft nose and are aimed upward, indicating connections to satellite and airborne communications nodes. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "This Is Our First Look at the Air Force’s Secret New Fighter Jet," 15 Apr. 2021 Soon after the Emorys arrive in Compton, terror begins to emanate from and surround their suburban home. Hannah Giorgis, The Atlantic, "Who Wants to Watch Black Pain?," 17 Apr. 2021 In 2017, an ad for Dove body wash showed a Black woman removing her shirt to reveal a White woman in the next frame — which seemed to emanate a racist trope from historical soap ads. BostonGlobe.com, "Kia tells owners of recalled cars to park them outside until repairs are made," 10 Mar. 2021 The shooting stars will emanate from the area around the Lyra constellation, for which the Lyrids are named, but they can be seen all across the sky. Stefanie Waldek, Travel + Leisure, "The Lyrid Meteor Shower Will Bring Dazzling Shooting Stars This Month," 4 Apr. 2021 But when shocks begin to emanate from the bond markets, which typically happens due to inflationary fears, diversification does not work as well. Vineer Bhansali, Forbes, "Avoiding The Coffin Corner: Get Ready For A Rate Increase Sooner Rather Than Later," 12 Mar. 2021 All of this points to the positive results that emanate from diversity in school leadership. Stanley S. Litow, The Conversation, "Meisha Porter is the first Black woman chancellor of NYC schools – here are the challenges she will face," 24 Mar. 2021 In 2017, an ad for Dove body wash showed a Black woman removing her shirt to reveal a White woman in the next frame — which seemed to emanate a racist trope from historical soap ads. BostonGlobe.com, "Kia tells owners of recalled cars to park them outside until repairs are made," 10 Mar. 2021 In 2017, an ad for Dove body wash showed a Black woman removing her shirt to reveal a White woman in the next frame — which seemed to emanate a racist trope from historical soap ads. Washington Post, "Unilever set to strip ‘normal’ from all its beauty products and advertising," 9 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Learn More about emanate

Time Traveler for emanate

Time Traveler

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

8 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Emanate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emanate. Accessed 17 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source
: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.
2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

Comments on emanate

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