emanate

verb
em·a·nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate 

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Videos and photos posted on Twitter by Brevard County Fire Rescue, which had crews at the scene to assist the Rockledge Fire Department, showed massive flames emanating from the one-story home. Jeff Weiner, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Videos show Rockledge home engulfed in flames," 2 June 2018 Don’t worry / About a thing ’Cause every little thing / Gonna be all right The sound emanates from a cupholder, where Klinsmann’s iPhone rests in a scuffed case. Chris Ballard, SI.com, "The Reflection, Future and Duality of Post-USMNT Jurgen Klinsmann," 16 May 2018 On stage the guy radiates charisma and emanates a personality that can’t be ignored. Timothy Finn, kansascity, "Jack White gives a big Kansas City crowd plenty to phone home about," 25 Apr. 2018 Trubisky has touted the energized team's new culture and a positive vibe emanating from Nagy, 40, whose persona should better suit this young roster than old school predecessor John Fox's demeanor did. Nate Davis, USA TODAY, "Bears training camp questions: Can Mitchell Trubisky take off under rookie coach Matt Nagy?," 10 July 2018 No one wants to make a connection between those horrendous moments at the Capital Gazette in Annapolis and the campaign to end press freedom emanating from the White House. Rochelle Riley, Detroit Free Press, "Rochelle Riley: Threats to journalists are threats to America," 8 July 2018 According to reports emanating from Italy, West Ham have entered into negotiations to sign Shakhtar Donetsk's Brazilian playmaker Bernard as Manuel Pellegrini looks to strengthen the Hammers squad ahead of the 2017/18 campaign. SI.com, "Italian Reports Suggest West Ham Have Opened Talks to Sign Shakhtar Donetsk Playmaker," 26 June 2018 In the last month, he's added another step to his routine: donning Bose white noise headphones in an attempt to drown out the noise emanating from Golden Road Brewing Co. six stories below. Benjy Egel, sacbee, "Golden Road Brewing keeps its neighbors up at night. Is the city partially to blame?," 21 June 2018 Nothing more than a gentle breeze stirs the air, as fireflies dance and occasional growls emanate from the storm cloud. Matthew Cappucci, Washington Post, "Bolts from the blue: Here’s how lightning can strike when a storm is tens of miles away," 27 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

28 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emanate

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source

: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·a·nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.

2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·a·nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate 

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

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Comments on emanate

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