emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

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Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
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Recent Examples on the Web

What is most striking in these photographs is the expression of relief the marchers seem to emanate. Andrew Solomon, New York Times, "The First New York Pride March Was an Act of ‘Desperate Courage’," 27 June 2019 Notable among the projects is LightSail 2, a solar sailing experiment run by The Planetary Society that will attempt to orbit Earth using only the power of molecules emanating from the sun. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "How to Watch SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Air Force Debut," 24 June 2019 This is the kind emanating from a building engulfed in flames. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, "Celtics’ future hinges on what Danny Ainge does next," 21 June 2019 The optics are part of Republican efforts to make the border a more urgent national priority, with much of it emanating from Arizona. Ronald J. Hansen, azcentral, "Schweikert, Gosar cite Mexican bloodshed, U.S. border crossings to make case for crisis," 11 June 2019 The thought that appears to emanate from one person could just as easily belong to his closest companion, to a total stranger, to all individuals in history. Merve Emre, The New York Review of Books, "‘Dismembered, Relocated, Rearranged’," 6 June 2019 The gamma rays would appear to emanate from a thick dark-matter cloud that astronomers could infer separately from gravitational evidence. Quanta Magazine, "A Seeker of Dark Matter’s Hidden Light," 1 Sep. 2016 Wearing a pair of white leggings and a hoodie with the iconic Polo emblem rendered in rainbow colours, Harper just emanates talent, poise, and most of all, pride. Eliza Huber, refinery29.com, "Harper Watters On Pride, Stonewall & How Dancing In Heels Kickstarted His Career," 10 June 2019 The streets are winding, the boutiques sell colorful cotton dresses and crisp linen shirts, and emanating from here and there is distinctly Greek pop music, full of trebly bouzouki sounds and minor key warblings. Adam Gopnik, Town & Country, "My First Visit to the Greek Islands Turned Out to Be a Journey Home," 20 May 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

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Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

3 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emanate

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

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More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source
: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈe-mə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.
2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ ˈem-ə-ˌnāt How to pronounce emanate (audio) \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

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More from Merriam-Webster on emanate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with emanate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for emanate

Spanish Central: Translation of emanate

Nglish: Translation of emanate for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of emanate for Arabic Speakers

Comments on emanate

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