emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ˈe-mə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Definition of emanate 

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source a sweet scent emanating from the blossoms

transitive verb

: emit she seems to emanate an air of serenity

Keep scrolling for more

Choose the Right Synonym for emanate

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of emanate in a Sentence

Good smells emanated from the kitchen. Constant criticism has emanated from her opponents. Happiness seems to emanate from her. She seems to emanate happiness.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

Schellman pointed out that astronomers using regular telescopes can't see beneath the surface of the sun, but 30 years of observations of the low-energy neutrinos that emanate from our star's center have allowed scientists to peer into its core. Author: Sarah Kaplan, Anchorage Daily News, "In a cosmic first, scientists detect ‘ghost particles’ from a distant galaxy," 12 July 2018 Schellman pointed out that astronomers using regular telescopes can't see beneath the surface of the sun, but 30 years of observations of the low-energy neutrinos that emanate from our star's center have allowed scientists to peer into its core. Sarah Kaplan, chicagotribune.com, "In a cosmic first, scientists detect 'ghost particles' from a distant galaxy," 12 July 2018 What is perhaps most striking in Doherty’s instructive account is the Red Scare vitriol that emanated from observers, commentators, and the general public. Noah Isenberg, The New Republic, "Making the Movies Un-American," 3 July 2018 In addition to the stadium and buildings nearby, there are also some new hotels, including a Sheraton, closer to the city center, which emanates from the gold-domed, hilltop Cathedral of St. Theodore Ushakov. Brett Martel, Fox News, "Saransk swells from building boom of World Cup proportions," 22 June 2018 Though there was none of the guttural cheering and angry taunts that often emanate from Mr. Trump’s campaign-style rallies, the president’s hallmark rhetoric and propensity to stretch the truth was also ever-present. Astead W. Herndon, New York Times, "Trumpism Finds a Safe Space at Conservative Women’s Conference," 17 June 2018 Frank Gehry was a real sonuvabitch because this same amplification applies to the body and any sounds that may emanate from it. Yusef Roach, Los Angeles Magazine, "The Communal Experience of Going to the Symphony for the First Time," 31 May 2018 By turning the mic over to a new character each episode, the show is trying to convey the spokes coming off of the hub, the vibrations that emanate from one defining moment. Alison Caporimo, Seventeen, ""13 Reasons Why" Season 2 Has Not One, But 13 Different Narrators," 18 May 2018 Young fish find their ways to coral reefs, like the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia, through the cacophony of sound that emanate from these environments. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "The Great Barrier Reef Has Gone Silent. Here's Why That's So Dangerous.," 1 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emanate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of emanate

1756, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for emanate

Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about emanate

Statistics for emanate

Last Updated

6 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emanate

The first known use of emanate was in 1756

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for emanate

emanate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of emanate

: to come out from a source

: to send (something) out : to give out (something)

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ˈe-mə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Kids Definition of emanate

1 : to come out from a source Heat emanated from the fire.

2 : to give off or out The teacher's face emanated kindness.

emanate

verb
em·​a·​nate | \ˈem-ə-ˌnāt \
emanated; emanating

Medical Definition of emanate 

intransitive verb

: to come out from a source

transitive verb

: to give out or emit

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on emanate

What made you want to look up emanate? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

a private place of worship

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Difficult Vocab Quiz

  • the-education-of-achilles-eugne-delacroix
  • Which is a synonym of discomfit?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!