spring

verb (1)
\ ˈspriŋ How to pronounce spring (audio) \
sprang\ ˈspraŋ How to pronounce sprang (audio) \ or sprung\ ˈsprəŋ How to pronounce sprung (audio) \; sprung; springing\ ˈspriŋ-​iŋ How to pronounce springing (audio) \

Definition of spring

 (Entry 1 of 3)

intransitive verb

1a(1) : dart, shoot sparks sprang out from the fire
(2) : to be resilient or elastic also : to move by elastic force the lid sprang shut
b : to become warped
2 : to issue with speed and force or as a stream tears spring from our eyes
3a : to grow as a plant
b : to issue by birth or descent sprang from the upper class
c : to come into being : arise towns sprang up across the plains
d archaic : dawn
e : to begin to blow used with up a breeze quickly sprang up
4a : to make a leap or series of leaps springing across the lawn
b : to leap or jump up suddenly sprang from their seats
5 : to stretch out in height : rise
6 : pay used with for I'll spring for the drinks

transitive verb

1 : to cause to spring
2a : to undergo or bring about the splitting or cracking of wind sprang the mast
b : to undergo the opening of (a leak)
3a : to cause to operate suddenly spring a trap
b : to apply or insert by bending
c : to bend by force
4 : to leap over
5 : to produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly
6 : to make lame
7 : to release or cause to be released from confinement or custody sprung them from jail

spring

noun, often attributive

Definition of spring (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : a source of supply especially : a source of water issuing from the ground
b : an ultimate source especially of action or motion
3 : a time or season of growth or development specifically : the season between winter and summer comprising in the northern hemisphere usually the months of March, April, and May or as reckoned astronomically extending from the March equinox to the June solstice
4 : an elastic body or device that recovers its original shape when released after being distorted
5a : the act or an instance of leaping up or forward : bound
b(1) : capacity for springing : resilience
(2) : energy, bounce
6 : the point or plane at which an arch or vault curve springs from its impost

spring

verb (2)
sprung\ ˈsprəŋ How to pronounce sprung (audio) \; springing\ ˈspriŋ-​iŋ How to pronounce springing (audio) \

Definition of spring (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to fit with springs

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Other Words from spring

Noun

springlike \ ˈspriŋ-​ˌlīk How to pronounce springlike (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for spring

Synonyms: Noun

bound, hop, jump, leap, vault

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Choose the Right Synonym for spring

Verb (1)

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of spring in a Sentence

Noun

We'll plant the seeds next spring. We've had a rainy spring. a beautiful day in early spring The first few weeks of spring were unusually warm. The mattress is old and some of the springs are broken. The cushion has lost its spring.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Within hundreds of years of first contact in Iron Gates, complex agricultural societies sprang up in southeastern Europe, along with other advances, such as intricate metalwork. Mark Barna, Discover Magazine, "When Farmers and Foragers First Met," 24 Oct. 2018 The Republican Party’s comfort with the crude authoritarianism of its president, though, did not spring out of nowhere. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "The Republican Court and the Era of Minority Rule," 27 June 2018 By the end of this month, the city has said, two of the heroin encampments that have sprung up in Kensington will be cleared. Aubrey Nagle, Philly.com, "Starbucks gets racial bias training, city clears Kensington heroin camps | Morning Newsletter," 30 May 2018 Forty years later, Schmidt’s has stayed afloat, to say the least — though considering the craft beer boom and the rate at which new bars and restaurants have sprung up in this area, staying afloat is maybe saying a lot. Emma Silvers, San Francisco Chronicle, "The story of the Albany pub where time stands still," 16 May 2018 Trick of the trade: For brides-to-be who can't spring for Ahnert or a staff member to accompany them to a destination, the salon offers makeup instruction and products to purchase for the wedding day. Jamie Rosen, Town & Country, "Prep Squad: Bridal Hair & Makeup," 20 Nov. 2013 At roughly 324 square miles, Memphis was nearly twice the size of Detroit, with roughly the same population, and new developments sprang up along its periphery. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Memphis downtown boom fueled by riverfront city’s rich history," 25 Sep. 2018 To help those who simply cannot afford to live on their own, or don’t want to, a number of options for finding a room or a roommate have sprung up in the last decade. Kim Velsey, New York Times, "Finding Your First Apartment," 1 June 2018 With just hours to go until the polls close, voters are already reporting long lines, and nonprofits like Pizza to the Polls have sprung into action to make sure that everybody waiting is well-fed. Kayla Webley Adler, Marie Claire, "The 2018 Midterm Elections," 6 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Analysts expect the industry to report an overall decline of around 5% in sales for March, historically one of the biggest months for car sales as the unofficial start to the spring selling season. Adrienne Roberts, WSJ, "U.S. Auto Sales Stumbled in First Quarter," 2 Apr. 2019 All that preparation readied Alaska residents to spring into action as soon as the shaking from the initial quake subsided. Mary Beth Griggs, The Verge, "How Alaska fixed its earthquake-shattered roads in just days," 8 Dec. 2018 Doing so causes the C930 to spring open slightly, allowing you to crook a finger under the lid and continue opening it. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Lenovo's dual-display Yoga Book C930 boasts a bigger screen and better 'keyboard'," 30 Aug. 2018 Conversely, the move to spring could pose issues for multiple upcoming PGA sites. Daniel Rapaport, SI.com, "FORE Questions: Breaking Down the New PGA Tour Schedule," 12 July 2018 News of a reported ABH eyelash launch comes after the brand unveiled their spring collection. Lauren Rearick, Teen Vogue, "Anastasia Beverly Hills Has Started Working on a Line of Eyelashes," 4 Apr. 2019 The extended sizing has over 120 (!) styles from its new spring collection, which features models Candice Huffine, Paloma Elsesser, and Ali Tate in a beautiful campaign shot in Mexico City. Rachel Epstein, Marie Claire, "Anthropologie Launches Its First Plus-Size Line, APlus by Anthropologie," 15 Mar. 2019 The start of spring might be just around the corner, but Mother Nature doesn't seem to care whatsoever. Amanda Garrity, Good Housekeeping, "A Bomb Cyclone Will Slam 70 Million People Across the U.S. Because Winter Just Won't Quit," 13 Mar. 2019 Read on to learn more—and see a sneak peek of the spring collection. Hadley Keller, House Beautiful, "Here's How to Do Glam Interiors Right," 11 Mar. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Within hundreds of years of first contact in Iron Gates, complex agricultural societies sprang up in southeastern Europe, along with other advances, such as intricate metalwork. Mark Barna, Discover Magazine, "When Farmers and Foragers First Met," 24 Oct. 2018 Just Wednesday, according to NPR, three new fires sprang up in the Sierra Nevada region. Lauren Young, Teen Vogue, "California Wildfires Are Proof of Climate Change, According to Governor Jerry Brown," 2 Aug. 2018 But the central bank systems that sprung up in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and were refined in the aftermath of the Great Depression were responses to such crises. Michael Hiltzik, latimes.com, "Is this scathing report the death knell for bitcoin?," 18 June 2018 About 4 million square feet of new businesses have sprung up in north Fort Worth in the three-plus years since traffic improvements were completed on Loop 820, one of the area's business leaders says. Gordon Dickson, star-telegram, "Fort Worth's highways are finally fixed, so these businesses are moving in," 6 June 2018 By the end of this month, the city has said, two of the heroin encampments that have sprung up in Kensington will be cleared. Aubrey Nagle, Philly.com, "Starbucks gets racial bias training, city clears Kensington heroin camps | Morning Newsletter," 30 May 2018 Forty years later, Schmidt’s has stayed afloat, to say the least — though considering the craft beer boom and the rate at which new bars and restaurants have sprung up in this area, staying afloat is maybe saying a lot. Emma Silvers, San Francisco Chronicle, "The story of the Albany pub where time stands still," 16 May 2018 Because the excitement for women candidates sprung from the Women’s March—that is, patent resistance to Trump—Republican women can’t capitalize on that momentum. Rebecca Nelson, Marie Claire, "Party Crashers: These Female Candidates Are Shaking Up The Midterms," 2 Nov. 2018 Those who know say the fest’s humble beginnings sprang from a two-man band with a keg of beer playing music in a tent. Ginger Brashinger, Daily Southtown, "Proud American Days to close out July with food, fun and entertainment," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'spring.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of spring

Verb (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1821, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for spring

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Old English springan; akin to Old High German springan to jump and perhaps to Greek sperchesthai to hasten

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Learn More about spring

Statistics for spring

Last Updated

18 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for spring

The first known use of spring was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for spring

spring

noun

Financial Definition of spring

What It Is

Springs are false breakouts that can trap the unsuspecting trader. Spring patterns quickly reverse, with the stock or index then often testing the opposite end of the trading range. A spring is a false breakout to the downside. It is so-named because prices "spring" back.

How It Works

Springs are a type of technical pattern named by legendary technician Richard Wycoff. The quality of the spring can be judged by an examination of the degree of penetration of support or resistance, as well as the volume on the day or period this penetration occurred. These four scenarios are possible:

-- Large penetration on large volume
Large penetration on small volume
Small penetration on large volume
Small penetration on small volume

For a spring, a small penetration on small volume is bullish, as it indicates there are few traders who are willing to sell their shares below support.

Springs provide the swing trader with good opportunities. First, they can provide a stop loss, which should be placed just below the extreme of the day the spring occurred. They can also create a target, since the stock is likely to test the opposite end of the trading range.

Why It Matters

Being able to accurately recognize a spring can turn a potential threat from a false breakouts into an opportunity. Swing traders should always watch the activity following a breakout to confirm whether a stock is behaving as it should. If not, then it might still provide an excellent trading situation -- if you spot a spring in the making.

Source: Investing Answers

spring

noun

English Language Learners Definition of spring

: the season between winter and summer : the season when plants and trees begin to grow
: a twisted or coiled piece of metal that returns to its original shape when it is pressed down or stretched
: the ability of something to return to its original shape when it is pressed down, stretched, twisted, etc.

spring

verb
\ ˈspriŋ How to pronounce spring (audio) \
sprang\ ˈspraŋ \ or sprung\ ˈsprəŋ \; sprung; springing

Kids Definition of spring

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to move suddenly upward or forward : leap The lion crouched, waiting to spring.
2 : to appear or grow quickly or suddenly Weeds sprang up overnight. Tears sprang from her eyes.
3 : to have (a leak) appear
4 : to move quickly by or as if by stretching and springing back The lid sprang shut.
5 : to cause to operate suddenly He was planning to spring a trap.
6 : to come into being : arise An idea sprang in his mind.

spring

noun

Kids Definition of spring (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the season between winter and summer including in the northern hemisphere usually the months of March, April, and May
2 : a twisted or coiled strip of material (as metal) that recovers its original shape when it is released after being squeezed or stretched
3 : the ability of something to return to its original shape when it is compressed or stretched
4 : a source of supply (as of water coming up from the ground)
5 : the act or an instance of leaping up or forward He … caught sight of the incredible spring of a doe …— Virginia Hamilton, M. C. Higgins
6 : a bouncy or lively quality She had a spring in her step.

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spring

noun
\ ˈspriŋ How to pronounce spring (audio) \

Medical Definition of spring

: any of various elastic orthodontic devices used especially to apply constant pressure to misaligned teeth

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More from Merriam-Webster on spring

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with spring

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for spring

Spanish Central: Translation of spring

Nglish: Translation of spring for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of spring for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about spring

Comments on spring

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