spring

verb (1)
\ ˈspriŋ \
sprang\ ˈspraŋ \ or sprung\ ˈsprəŋ \; sprung; springing\ ˈspriŋ-​iŋ \

Definition of spring

 (Entry 1 of 3)

intransitive verb

1a(1) : dart, shoot sparks sprang out from the fire
(2) : to be resilient or elastic also : to move by elastic force the lid sprang shut
b : to become warped
2 : to issue with speed and force or as a stream tears spring from our eyes
3a : to grow as a plant
b : to issue by birth or descent sprang from the upper class
c : to come into being : arise towns sprang up across the plains
d archaic : dawn
e : to begin to blow used with up a breeze quickly sprang up
4a : to make a leap or series of leaps springing across the lawn
b : to leap or jump up suddenly sprang from their seats
5 : to stretch out in height : rise
6 : pay used with for I'll spring for the drinks

transitive verb

1 : to cause to spring
2a : to undergo or bring about the splitting or cracking of wind sprang the mast
b : to undergo the opening of (a leak)
3a : to cause to operate suddenly spring a trap
b : to apply or insert by bending
c : to bend by force
4 : to leap over
5 : to produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly
6 : to make lame
7 : to release or cause to be released from confinement or custody sprung them from jail

spring

noun, often attributive

Definition of spring (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : a source of supply especially : a source of water issuing from the ground
b : an ultimate source especially of action or motion
3 : a time or season of growth or development specifically : the season between winter and summer comprising in the northern hemisphere usually the months of March, April, and May or as reckoned astronomically extending from the March equinox to the June solstice
4 : an elastic body or device that recovers its original shape when released after being distorted
5a : the act or an instance of leaping up or forward : bound
b(1) : capacity for springing : resilience
(2) : energy, bounce
6 : the point or plane at which an arch or vault curve springs from its impost

spring

verb (2)
sprung\ ˈsprəŋ \; springing\ ˈspriŋ-​iŋ \

Definition of spring (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to fit with springs

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Other Words from spring

Noun

springlike \ ˈspriŋ-​ˌlīk \ adjective

Synonyms for spring

Synonyms: Noun

bound, hop, jump, leap, vault

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Verb (1)

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of spring in a Sentence

Noun

We'll plant the seeds next spring. We've had a rainy spring. a beautiful day in early spring The first few weeks of spring were unusually warm. The mattress is old and some of the springs are broken. The cushion has lost its spring.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The baseball adage that hope springs eternal sounds most appropriate as the Aberdeen IronBirds start play again Friday. The Aegis, "Hope springs eternal [Editorial]," 13 June 2018 Today, the Journal of High Energy Physics published his last work in cosmology—the science of how the universe sprang into being and evolved. Adrian Cho, Science | AAAS, "Stephen Hawking’s (almost) last paper: putting an end to the beginning of the universe," 2 May 2018 Underneath the pomp and circumstance, and all the feel-good that baseball has returned once again and that hope springs eternal, all Opening Day is is one game. Jeff Wilson, star-telegram, "One game. One opening loss. No shortage of knee-jerking after Rangers fall to Astros | Fort Worth Star-Telegram," 29 Mar. 2018 Hope springs eternal when green is embedded in your veins. Peter Fimrite, San Francisco Chronicle, "Barbecue and high hopes as A’s fans flock to Opening Day," 29 Mar. 2018 Detroit Tigers pitchers and catchers report to camp on Tuesday and optimism is in the air, hope springs eternal, the sound of cleats on concrete and all that. Anthony Fenech, Detroit Free Press, "Detroit Tigers will stink in 2018; here's why they'll be fun to watch," 12 Feb. 2018 Most of us can’t spring for a tiara or diamond brooch, but a pearl pendant or earrings, even if fake, comes close. Nancy Macdonell, WSJ, "How Classic Pearls Became Improbably Hip," 11 Dec. 2018 Marquez helped spark a counterattack in the 78th minute, springing Layun forward on a one-man foray. Avi Creditor, SI.com, "WATCH: Chucky Lozano Gives Mexico World Cup Win Over Germany," 17 June 2018 Cultures, like caterpillars, crawl forward in contradictions, drawing back and then suddenly springing forward. Junot Díaz, The New Yorker, "The Sense Beneath Edward Lear’s Nonsense," 17 Apr. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The other main types of sofa suspension are webbing and sinuous-springs. Hadley Mendelsohn, House Beautiful, "Everything You Need to Know About 8-Way Hand-Tied Sofas," 5 Jan. 2019 Perhaps most important, organizers no longer market Oktoberfest as a kind of Bavarian spring break for college-age revelers. Paul Roberts, The Seattle Times, "Peak Oktober: Has Leavenworth’s famously beery festival reached its limit?," 26 Oct. 2018 Some trips are during spring break and some are in the summer. Jane Wester, charlotteobserver, "Providence Day students, faculty injured in crash in Argentina," 18 June 2018 Elizabeth Schnell knew her team had the chemistry and the determination to make a run at the spring league championship in the Girls Intermediate Division of the Coral Springs Basketball Club. Gary Curreri, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Intermediate girls vie for the title in Coral Springs youth basketball," 17 June 2018 Nowadays, with spring breaks all over the calendar, instead of holding it during Easter week, the tournament has been somewhat reduced, Davis said. Katherine Yamada, latimes.com, "Verdugo Views: Taking part in a tournament during his high school years in Glendale," 14 June 2018 Adjectives like snug, cozy, fire-lit all spring to mind. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Super modern ski chalet is a wintertime dream," 29 Nov. 2018 The coiled spring was invented in the mid-1800s, making seats significantly more comfortable than before. Maggie Burch, House Beautiful, "Everything You Need To Know About The Classic Chesterfield Sofa," 26 Nov. 2018 One cup of stinging nettle, which was the traditional spring green, contains as much iron as a cup of kale and more calcium than a glass of milk. Sandy M. Fernandez, Woman's Day, "How Three Women Are Pioneering to End Hunger in the U.S.," 14 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The suspect had just been sprung from jail after being convicted on a charge of criminal mischief. Madeleine Marr, miamiherald, "He had just been released from jail. His freedom lasted exactly 6 hours and 9 minutes," 29 June 2018 Not only did the Brewers score only nine runs in the three games, going 0 for 16 with runners in scoring position, their previously dominant bullpen sprung significant leaks in the opener and finale. Tom Haudricourt, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "White Sox 6, Brewers 1: String of winning series ends at six as bats go quiet in Chicago," 3 June 2018 The gilets jaunes protests sprung up in response to Mr. Macron’s proposal to raise taxes on diesel fuel. Stacy Meichtry, WSJ, "Antigovernment Rally Is Among the Most Violent to Hit Paris in Decades," 2 Dec. 2018 By knowing which viruses pose a threat to humans and which animals carry them, EcoHealth and similar groups will be even better prepared to predict where the next pandemic may spring up. Mallory Locklear, Discover Magazine, "With Big Data and Predictive Analytics, Scientists Are Getting Smarter About Outbreaks," 8 Nov. 2018 Trump has seized on the caravan as an election issue and portrayed it as a major threat, though such caravans have sprung up regularly over the years and largely passed unnoticed. Amy Guthrie, The Seattle Times, "Aid arrives for migrants at Mexico City stadium as US votes," 6 Nov. 2018 Cacao seeds were a form a currency and regularly traded, so large plantations may have sprung up to cultivate them. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Chocolate has an even earlier origin than we thought, new study finds," 29 Oct. 2018 At roughly 324 square miles, Memphis was nearly twice the size of Detroit, with roughly the same population, and new developments sprang up along its periphery. Patrick Sisson, Curbed, "Memphis downtown boom fueled by riverfront city’s rich history," 25 Sep. 2018 The rail line’s kickoff was not without controversy — some of which sprung Tuesday, four days before its grand opening. Matthew Ormseth, courant.com, "Riding The Hartford Line: Years In The Making, Now Days Away," 13 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'spring.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of spring

Verb (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 2

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1821, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for spring

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Old English springan; akin to Old High German springan to jump and perhaps to Greek sperchesthai to hasten

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Learn More about spring

Statistics for spring

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for spring

The first known use of spring was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for spring

spring

noun

Financial Definition of spring

What It Is

Springs are false breakouts that can trap the unsuspecting trader. Spring patterns quickly reverse, with the stock or index then often testing the opposite end of the trading range. A spring is a false breakout to the downside. It is so-named because prices "spring" back.

How It Works

Springs are a type of technical pattern named by legendary technician Richard Wycoff. The quality of the spring can be judged by an examination of the degree of penetration of support or resistance, as well as the volume on the day or period this penetration occurred. These four scenarios are possible:

-- Large penetration on large volume
Large penetration on small volume
Small penetration on large volume
Small penetration on small volume

For a spring, a small penetration on small volume is bullish, as it indicates there are few traders who are willing to sell their shares below support.

Springs provide the swing trader with good opportunities. First, they can provide a stop loss, which should be placed just below the extreme of the day the spring occurred. They can also create a target, since the stock is likely to test the opposite end of the trading range.

Why It Matters

Being able to accurately recognize a spring can turn a potential threat from a false breakouts into an opportunity. Swing traders should always watch the activity following a breakout to confirm whether a stock is behaving as it should. If not, then it might still provide an excellent trading situation -- if you spot a spring in the making.

Source: Investing Answers

spring

noun

English Language Learners Definition of spring

: the season between winter and summer : the season when plants and trees begin to grow

: a twisted or coiled piece of metal that returns to its original shape when it is pressed down or stretched

: the ability of something to return to its original shape when it is pressed down, stretched, twisted, etc.

spring

verb
\ ˈspriŋ \
sprang\ ˈspraŋ \ or sprung\ ˈsprəŋ \; sprung; springing

Kids Definition of spring

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to move suddenly upward or forward : leap The lion crouched, waiting to spring.
2 : to appear or grow quickly or suddenly Weeds sprang up overnight. Tears sprang from her eyes.
3 : to have (a leak) appear
4 : to move quickly by or as if by stretching and springing back The lid sprang shut.
5 : to cause to operate suddenly He was planning to spring a trap.
6 : to come into being : arise An idea sprang in his mind.

spring

noun

Kids Definition of spring (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the season between winter and summer including in the northern hemisphere usually the months of March, April, and May
2 : a twisted or coiled strip of material (as metal) that recovers its original shape when it is released after being squeezed or stretched
3 : the ability of something to return to its original shape when it is compressed or stretched
4 : a source of supply (as of water coming up from the ground)
5 : the act or an instance of leaping up or forward He … caught sight of the incredible spring of a doe …— Virginia Hamilton, M. C. Higgins
6 : a bouncy or lively quality She had a spring in her step.

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spring

noun
\ ˈspriŋ \

Medical Definition of spring

: any of various elastic orthodontic devices used especially to apply constant pressure to misaligned teeth

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More from Merriam-Webster on spring

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with spring

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for spring

Spanish Central: Translation of spring

Nglish: Translation of spring for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of spring for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about spring

Comments on spring

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