arise

verb
\ə-ˈrīz \
arose\ -​ˈrōz \; arisen\ -​ˈri-​zᵊn \; arising\ -​ˈrī-​ziŋ \

Definition of arise 

intransitive verb

1a : to begin to occur or to exist : to come into being or to attention Problems arise when people try to avoid responsibility. A conflict arose because of a misunderstanding. Questions have arisen concerning the company's financial records. He can defend himself should the need arise. [=if it becomes necessary to do so]

b : to originate from a source arteries that arise from the aorta a river that arises from two main sources

2 : to get up or stand up : rise He arose from his chair. especially : to get up from sleep or after lying down He arose (from bed) refreshed after a good night's sleep.

3 : to move upward : ascend A mist arose from the valley.

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Choose the Right Synonym for arise

spring, arise, rise, originate, derive, flow, issue, emanate, proceed, stem mean to come up or out of something into existence. spring implies rapid or sudden emerging. an idea that springs to mind arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent. new questions have arisen slowly rose to prominence originate implies a definite source or starting point. the fire originated in the basement derive implies a prior existence in another form. the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception. words flowed easily from her pen issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet. blood issued from the cut emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source. reports emanating from the capital proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause. advice that proceeds from the best of intentions stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development. industries stemming from space research

Examples of arise in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

There are also risks to democratic backsliding that arise due to Democrats’ victory in the House. Dylan Matthews, Vox, "Trump has eroded important democratic institutions. Will Democratic wins change that?," 8 Nov. 2018 Part 1, which airs Monday night, concerns itself with the warnings that arose, very early on, about the dangers Facebook posed to democratic institutions. Casey Newton, The Verge, "The Google walkout offers a playbook for successful corporate protests," 2 Nov. 2018 These are the mysteries of the universe that arise, like ghosts, every Halloween — a.k.a candy-corn season. Maura Judkis, The Seattle Times, "Candy corn controversy? ‘Most-hated’ Halloween treat expands flavors, options," 30 Oct. 2018 Researchers believe that huge amounts of dust can be raised on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, by strong wind gusts that arise in powerful methane storms. Chris Ciaccia, Fox News, "Alien life on Saturn's moon? Dust storms on Titan spotted for the first time," 25 Sep. 2018 And so it’s mothers who are left to negotiate the workplace issues that arise from it. Jenna Sauers, Harper's BAZAAR, "Why Women Really Quit Breastfeeding," 17 July 2018 In the past year, the lack of an agreement has led to concerns from city leaders and staff about liabilities that could arise at the site. David Hernandez, sandiegouniontribune.com, "National City to move forward with plans for community gardens," 12 July 2018 Sadly, the problems that arise between T.S.A. and passengers aren’t going to go away any time soon. New York Times, "Court Gives T.S.A. Screeners Immunity From Abuse Lawsuits," 12 July 2018 Indeed, some of the issues that have arisen in other countries would strike Americans as comparatively minor. Joanna Slater, Washington Post, "Selecting a Supreme Court justice doesn’t have to be a battle royal. Here’s how other countries do it.," 10 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'arise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of arise

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for arise

Middle English, from Old English ārīsan, from ā-, perfective prefix + rīsan to rise — more at abide

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Learn More about arise

Dictionary Entries near arise

Arisaema

arisaid

Arisaka

arise

arisings

arista

aristapedia

Statistics for arise

Last Updated

18 Nov 2018

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Time Traveler for arise

The first known use of arise was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for arise

arise

verb
\ə-ˈrīz \
arose\ -​ˈrōz \; arisen\ -​ˈri-​zᵊn \; arising\ -​ˈrī-​ziŋ \

Kids Definition of arise

1 : to move upward Mist arose from the valley.

2 : to get up from sleep or after lying down

3 : to come into existence A dispute arose.

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Comments on arise

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