start

verb
\ ˈstärt \

Definition of start 

(Entry 1 of 3)

intransitive verb

1a : to move suddenly and violently : spring started angrily to his feet
b : to react with a sudden brief involuntary movement started when a shot rang out
2a : to issue with sudden force blood starting from the wound
b : to come into being, activity, or operation when does the movie start the rain started up again
3 : to protrude or seem to protrude eyes starting from their sockets
4 : to become loosened or forced out of place one of the planks has started
5a : to begin a course or journey started toward the door just starting out
b : to range from a specified initial point the rates start at $10
6 : to begin an activity or undertaking especially : to begin work
7 : to be a participant in a game or contest especially : to be in the starting lineup

transitive verb

1 : to cause to leave a place of concealment : flush start a rabbit
2 archaic : startle, alarm
3 : to bring up for consideration or discussion
4 : to bring into being start a rumor
5 : to cause to become loosened or displaced
6 : to begin the use of start a fresh loaf of bread
7a : to cause to move, act, or operate start the motor
b : to cause to enter a game or contest especially : to put in the starting lineup
c : to care for or train during the early stages of growth and development started plants a well-started coonhound
8 : to do or experience the first stages or actions of started studying music at the age of five
start something or less commonly start anything
: to make trouble always trying to start something don't start anything
to start with
1 : at the beginning : initially
2 : in any event

start

noun

Definition of start (Entry 2 of 3)

1a : a sudden involuntary bodily movement or reaction woke with a start
b : a brief and sudden action or movement
c : a sudden capricious impulse or outburst
2 : a beginning of movement, activity, or development a false start housing starts
4 : a place of beginning
5 : the act or an instance of being a competitor in a race or a member of a starting lineup in a game undefeated in six startsCurrent Biography

START

abbreviation
\ ˈstärt \

Definition of START (Entry 3 of 3)

strategic arms reduction talks

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Choose the Right Synonym for start

Verb

begin, commence, start, initiate, inaugurate, usher in mean to take the first step in a course, process, or operation. begin, start, and commence are often interchangeable. begin, opposed to end, is the most general. begin a trip began dancing start, opposed to stop, applies especially to first actions, steps, or stages. the work started slowly commence can be more formal or bookish than begin or start. commence firing commenced a conversation initiate implies taking a first step in a process or series that is to continue. initiated diplomatic contacts inaugurate suggests a beginning of some formality or notion of significance. the discovery of penicillin inaugurated a new era in medicine usher in is somewhat less weighty than inaugurate. ushered in a period of economic decline

Examples of start in a Sentence

Verb

They started clearing land for the new housing development. He started studying music at the age of five. As soon as you're ready to play, we'll start. Let's start with some warm-up exercises. He deleted what he wrote and started fresh. Olympic athletes start young and train hard. I started the quilt last month. Have you started your book report? We started the meeting at 6:30. She started the meeting with a brief review of the previous meeting.

Noun

knew from the start of the game that he would win easily
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Eventually, Fallon left Diner to open Maiden Lane in the East Village, and the three started discussing plans for their own spot. Thomas Gebremedhin, WSJ, "The Restaurateurs Behind Hart’s and Cervo’s Open a New Wine Bar in Brooklyn," 9 Jan. 2019 That started a run of go-get-’em-girl romantic comedies, from Ella Enchanted to The Devil Wears Prada to Love & Other Drugs. Elizabeth Holmes, Town & Country, "Anne Hathaway Is Nobody's Punching Bag," 8 Jan. 2019 At the time, there were more questions about LiveWire than there were answers, but Harley has finally released details on the bike, which will reportedly retail for $29,000 when the company starts fulfilling orders in the fall. Sam Blum, Popular Mechanics, "Harley-Davidson's LiveWire Electric Bike Is Here—And Very Expensive," 7 Jan. 2019 In September, Meghan really brought it home with her work alongside the women of the Hubb Community Kitchen in west London, a communal space first started to help those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire. Omid Scobie, Harper's BAZAAR, "Meghan Markle in 2018: Why the Duchess of Success Is Just Getting Started," 31 Dec. 2018 The company hit its mid-year goal just a few hours after Musk’s deadline, and finally started turning a slight profit on the Model 3. Sean O'kane, The Verge, "The Verge 2018 tech report card: Tesla," 29 Dec. 2018 Epic’s starting off strong, too: The first freebie is Subnautica, the underwater survival game that emerged from early access in 2018. Hayden Dingman, PCWorld, "Free copies of Subnautica: Epic Games Store kickstarts your library with a winner," 14 Dec. 2018 Many others, such as basil and parsley, can be started from seed. Arricca Elin Sansone, Country Living, "How to Grow an Indoor Herb Garden That Actually Stays Alive All Winter," 7 Dec. 2018 That concept starts with replacing windows with screens. Pam Baker, Ars Technica, "Where we’re going, we won’t need windows: How autonomy will change cars," 5 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Tigers got plenty of them from start to finish. Pete Iacobelli, The Seattle Times, "Clemson uses big moments to topple Tide for title," 8 Jan. 2019 While recycling helps mitigate some of that waste, gadget makers have begun experimenting with new materials that can make products more sustainable from the start. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "Sleek new speaker features recyclable wood cabinet," 27 Dec. 2018 Her race had been an uphill climb from the start, given that Donald Trump remains popular in North Dakota and won that state with ease in 2016. Mattie Kahn, Glamour, "What It's Like to Lose in the Year of the Woman," 21 Dec. 2018 Bringing comic characters into video games must have seemed like a no-brainer from the start. Michael Thompson, Ars Technica, "Drawn together: The love affair between comics and games," 24 Dec. 2018 Simons’s take on Americana at Calvin Klein was critically lauded from the start. Steff Yotka, Vogue, "Raf Simons Departs Calvin Klein," 22 Dec. 2018 And the fall from the start of the year to the lowest point during the year has been worse in almost half the years of the past half-century. James Mackintosh, WSJ, "Markets Corrected Investor Mistakes This Year, And it Hurts," 20 Dec. 2018 Think about it: Use a harsh face wash that dries out your skin from the start and suddenly your moisturizer is already set up for failure trying to get it back to its baseline. Nicole Catanese, Marie Claire, "5 Ways to Supercharge Your Skincare Products," 10 Dec. 2018 The move Wednesday gives the 44-year-old former San Antonio mayor an early start to what’s shaping up as a crowded Democratic field without a clear front-runner to challenge President Donald Trump. Paul J. Weber, The Seattle Times, "APNewsBreak: Julian Castro moves toward 2020 White House run," 12 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'start.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of start

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for start

Verb

Middle English sterten; akin to Middle High German sterzen to stand up stiffly, move quickly

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Learn More about start

Statistics for start

Last Updated

12 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for start

The first known use of start was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for start

start

verb

English Language Learners Definition of start

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to do the first part of something : to begin doing something

: to begin to work on, produce, or give attention to (something)

: to cause (something) to begin : to cause (something) to begin in a specified way

start

noun

English Language Learners Definition of start (Entry 2 of 2)

: the time at which something begins

: the first part of an activity, development, event, etc.

: the first opportunity to begin a career

start

verb
\ ˈstärt \
started; starting

Kids Definition of start

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to begin an activity I'm starting a new book.
2 : to come or bring into being or action Who started the rumor? Rain is likely to start soon.
3 : to begin to move toward a particular place or in a particular direction Let's start for home.
4 : to cause to move, act, or operate I'll try to start the motor.
5 : to give a sudden twitch or jerk (as in surprise)
6 : to stick out or seem to stick out Their eyes started from the sockets.

start

noun

Kids Definition of start (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sudden twitching or jerking movement a start of surprise
2 : a beginning of movement, action, or development I got an early start.
3 : a brief act, movement, or effort They work by fits and starts.
4 : a place of beginning (as of a race)

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More from Merriam-Webster on start

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with start

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for start

Spanish Central: Translation of start

Nglish: Translation of start for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of start for Arabic Speakers

Comments on start

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