flush

1 of 7

verb (1)

flushed; flushing; flushes

intransitive verb

: to fly away suddenly

transitive verb

1
: to cause (a bird) to flush
The birds were flushed out of the trees.
2
: to expose or chase from a place of concealment
flushed the boys from their hiding place
Police flushed the suspects from the building.

flush

2 of 7

noun (1)

1
: a hand of playing cards all of the same suit
specifically : a poker hand containing five cards of the same suit but not in sequence see poker illustration
2
: a series of three or more slalom gates set vertically on a slope

flush

3 of 7

noun (2)

1
: a sudden flow (as of water)
also : a rinsing or cleansing with or as if with a flush of water
2
a
: a sudden increase or expansion
especially : sudden and usually abundant new plant growth
the spring flush of grass
b
: a surge of emotion
felt a flush of anger at the insult
3
a
: a tinge of red : blush
b
: a fresh and vigorous state
in the first flush of womanhood
4
: a transitory sensation of extreme heat compare hot flash

flush

4 of 7

verb (2)

flushed; flushing; flushes

intransitive verb

1
: to flow and spread suddenly and freely
2
a
: to glow brightly
b
: blush
3
: to produce new growth
the plants flush twice during the year

transitive verb

1
a
: to cause to flow
b
: to pour liquid over or through
especially : to cleanse or wash out with or as if with a rush of liquid
flush the toilet
flush the lungs with air
2
: inflame, excite
usually used passively
flushed with pride
3
: to cause to blush

flush

5 of 7

adjective

1
a
: of a ruddy healthy color
b
: full of life and vigor : lusty
2
a
: filled to overflowing
streams flush with the spring runoff
b
informal : having a large amount of money
feeling flush
a company that's flush with cash/money
3
informal : readily available : abundant
4
a
: having or forming a continuous plane or unbroken surface
flush paneling
b
: directly abutting or immediately adjacent: such as
(1)
: set even with an edge of a type page or column : having no indention
(2)
: arranged edge to edge so as to fit snugly
flushness noun

flush

6 of 7

adverb

1
: in a flush manner
2
: squarely
hit him flush on the chin

flush

7 of 7

verb (3)

flushed; flushing; flushes

transitive verb

: to make flush
flush the headings on a page

Examples of flush in a Sentence

Adjective He just got paid and he was feeling flush. was flushed after getting out of the hot bath Adverb She placed her hands flush against the door and pushed with all her might. He hit the ball flush.
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
This is because spring and summer are the seasons when cycads put out their annual flush of growth. Joshua Siskin, Orange County Register, 30 Mar. 2024 When the plane is on the ground, however, the differential pressure isn’t there – meaning that the toilet flush is operated by a pump, which creates a vacuum in the tank. Julia Buckley, CNN, 9 Mar. 2024 The good news is that corporate America has come through the pandemic flush with an unprecedented amount of cash. Marc Cooper, Forbes, 1 Mar. 2024 During the 2017 eclipse, a study using radar to detect bird and insect movement in the air showed a flush of activity during totality, Dunn said. Karl Schneider, The Indianapolis Star, 18 Mar. 2024 Artist Yumi Lee took cues from the tropics—leaning into earthy tones and natural flushes of color in partnership with MERIT. Kiana Murden, Vogue, 13 Feb. 2024 Though shimmery, the lip gloss has subtle color, while the eyeshadows are simple to blend and the blush gives a nice, natural-looking flush to the cheeks. Rich Scherr, Parents, 9 Jan. 2024 Note, this also includes full houses or flushes containing two pairs. Barry Collins, Forbes, 26 Feb. 2024 During rain events, flushes of fungi colonize the soil. Zoya Teirstein, WIRED, 17 Feb. 2024
Verb
With the complications of mast cell activation syndrome, including drops in blood pressure, flushing, severe itching and rashes, Ms. Banks relied on alternative therapies, including reiki, hypnosis, emotional freedom technique, quantum healing and regression therapy. Alex Williams, New York Times, 27 Mar. 2024 While packing up my father's estate, I was overcome with an urgent desire to flush the poison of the previous three years from my cells. Chloe Bottero, Condé Nast Traveler, 20 Feb. 2024 But with multiple problems for cities now converging—extreme heat, water shortages, and rapid population growth—increasingly scientists are finding clever ways to extract more use from water that’s flushed away. Matt Simon, WIRED, 12 Feb. 2024 The gentle formula flushes out irritants and moisturizes dry nasal passages related to allergies, colds, flu, and sinusitis. Nora Colomer, Fox News, 18 Mar. 2024 Observers should avoid agitating or flushing the eagles from the nest as well as minimize the use of flash photography. Jim Riccioli, Journal Sentinel, 5 Mar. 2024 Thankfully, the changes Vance instituted to flush out an NCIS mole — Ziva to Israel! Sara Netzley, EW.com, 29 Feb. 2024 Rules on flushing to protect endangered fish there have long angered those who rely on the Delta’s water supply. Gillian Brassil, Sacramento Bee, 25 Feb. 2024 The cerebrospinal fluid picks up all of the waste products in the spaces between neurons before being flushed out again through the same channels, leaving behind clean interstitial fluid. William A. Haseltine, Forbes, 29 Feb. 2024
Adjective
The vibe outside is more unified and streamlined than before, with conventional door handles replaced by flush grips that extend and retract automatically. Basem Wasef, Robb Report, 2 Apr. 2024 In the sprawl beyond Bengaluru’s core, where dreams of tech riches usually grow, schools lack water to flush toilets. Damien Cave Atul Loke, New York Times, 31 Mar. 2024 All that is to say, Ukraine soon could be flush with artillery ammo. David Axe, Forbes, 29 Mar. 2024 When the spackle dries, add another layer of spackle and smooth it out to cover all of the mesh, leaving the spackle edges almost flush with the wall. Jeanne Huber, Washington Post, 8 Mar. 2024 The Rams are flush with salary-cap space and cash to spend on free agents. Gary Klein, Los Angeles Times, 27 Feb. 2024 On Valentine’s Day, Bradley Cooper strode onto the stage of Lincoln Center’s David Geffen Hall, flush with exuberance in his tux. Michael Schulman, The New Yorker, 26 Feb. 2024 At that time, consumers were still mostly stuck at home, flush with savings and had little else to do but spend on goods. Anna Cooban, CNN, 8 Feb. 2024 The country’s northernmost region happens to be flush with hotels that are purpose-built for snoozing under the night sky, where the Northern Lights are visible about 200 nights a year. Paul Rubio, Condé Nast Traveler, 11 Mar. 2024
Adverb
And it’s estimated that 2.2 billion pounds of chloride flush into Lake Michigan annually. Journal Sentinel, 1 Apr. 2024 If plastic wall anchors are left, slice the plastic off flush with the wall, using a sharp utility knife. Jeanne Huber, Washington Post, 8 Mar. 2024 Iran in particular has emerged flush with cash, a consequence of the U.S.’ own faltering steps — from the Obama administration to Donald Trump’s tenure — that inadvertently bolstered Iran’s economic resilience. Sanctions, once the sharp sword of U.S. foreign policy, have been blunted. Armstrong Williams, Orange County Register, 3 Feb. 2024 The room was tiny, with space for a twin bed, arranged flush against the walls, and a sink. Olivia Bensimon Todd Heisler, New York Times, 20 Feb. 2024 For example, having a low nose bridge might mean the headset slips or does not sit flush on the face. Demetrius Simms, Robb Report, 15 Feb. 2024 The cabinet doors were easy to open and even easier to close, thanks to magnetic strips that keep them closed flush. Barbara Bellesi Zito, Better Homes & Gardens, 4 Jan. 2024 Ski sweaters are worn between moisture-wicking base layers that go flush against your skin and your heavy-duty, waterproof shell. Lydia Price, Travel + Leisure, 31 Oct. 2023 The base has a rim that sits flush against the tile or ceramic floor to catch anything that’s not water or soap from escaping down the drain. Madison Yauger, Peoplemag, 21 Dec. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'flush.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb (1)

Middle English flusshen

Noun (1)

Middle French flus, fluz, from Latin fluxus flow, flux

Noun (2)

perhaps modification of Latin fluxus

First Known Use

Verb (1)

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun (1)

circa 1529, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

1529, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1548, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Adjective

circa 1568, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

1700, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (3)

circa 1842, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of flush was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near flush

Cite this Entry

“Flush.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flush. Accessed 13 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

flush

1 of 5 verb
: to take flight or cause to take flight suddenly
flushed several quail

flush

2 of 5 noun
1
: a sudden flow (as of water)
2
: a sudden increase (as of emotion)
a flush of triumph
3
b
: a fresh and vigorous state
the flush of youth
4
: a brief sensation of heat

flush

3 of 5 verb
1
2
: to pour liquid over or through
especially : to wash out with a rush of liquid
flush a toilet
3
: inflame sense 2, excite
flushed with pride
4
: to make red or hot

flush

4 of 5 adjective
1
a
: of a healthy reddish color
b
: full of life and vigor : lusty
2
a
: filled to overflowing
b
: well supplied especially with money
3
a
: having an unbroken surface
flush paneling
b
: even with the neighboring surface
a river flush with the top of its bank
flushness noun

flush

5 of 5 adverb
1
: so as to be flush
2
: so as to make solid contact
a blow flush on the chin
Etymology

Verb

Middle English flusshen "to fly up suddenly"

Noun

perhaps from Latin fluxus, "flow," from fluere "to flow" — related to fluid

Medical Definition

flush

1 of 2 noun
: a transitory sensation of extreme heat (as in response to some drugs or in some physiological states)
menopausal flushes

flush

2 of 2 intransitive verb
: to blush or become suddenly suffused with color due to vasodilation

transitive verb

: to cleanse or wash out with or as if with a rush of liquid
the newly sewn incision is flushed with salineDon Gold

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