bound

1 of 7

adjective (1)

1
a
: fastened by or as if by a band : confined
desk-bound
b
: very likely : sure
bound to rain soon
2
: placed under legal or moral restraint or obligation : obliged
duty-bound
3
of a book : secured to the covers by cords, tapes, or glue
leather-bound
4
: determined, resolved
was bound and determined to have his way
5
: held in chemical or physical combination
6
: made costive (see costive sense 1a) : constipated
7
: always occurring in combination with another linguistic form
un- in unknown and -er in speaker are bound forms
compare free entry 1 sense 11d

bound

2 of 7

past tense and past participle of bind

bound

3 of 7

adjective (2)

1
: intending to go : going
bound for home
college-bound
2
archaic : ready

bound

4 of 7

noun (1)

plural bounds
1
: leap, jump
cleared the hedge at a bound
2
: the action of rebounding : bounce

bound

5 of 7

verb (1)

bounded; bounding; bounds

intransitive verb

1
: to move by leaping
deer bounding across a field
She bounded down the stairs.
2
: rebound, bounce
a bounding rubber ball

bound

6 of 7

noun (2)

plural bounds
1
a
: a limiting line : boundary
usually used in plural
The ball landed out of bounds.
b
: something that limits or restrains
beyond the bounds of decency
police officers overstepping their bound
2
usually bounds
b
: the land within certain bounds
woodland bounds
3
mathematics : a number greater than or equal to every number in a set (such as the range of a function)
also : a number less than or equal to every number in a set

bound

7 of 7

verb

bounded; bounding; bounds

transitive verb

1
: to form a separating line or the boundary of : enclose
A chain-link fence bounds the yard.
The state is bounded on its east by the Connecticut River.
2
: to set limits to : confine
art … is always greater than the rules with which we may attempt to bound itC. S. Kilby
3
: to name the boundaries of
Students were asked to bound their state.

Examples of bound in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
According to the complaint, the family was sitting at a nearby table when George approached them and started mocking the couple's daughter, who was described as having Down syndrome and was wheelchair bound. Stepheny Price, Fox News, 5 Apr. 2024 After his retirement several years ago, some of us decided to gather his sermons from the past 10 years or so into a bound volume and present it to him. Kwame Anthony Appiah, New York Times, 22 Mar. 2024 Another man with cuts and bruises to his face was shown being questioned via an interpreter while sitting on a bench with bound hands and feet. Guy Faulconbridge, USA TODAY, 23 Mar. 2024 In 2017, passengers on a deportation flight to Somalia said they were left bound and shackled in their seats for 23 hours during a stopover, some forced to soil themselves because they were denied bathroom visits. Mckenzie Funk, ProPublica, 8 Mar. 2024 This led to an additional improvement of omega’s upper bound, reducing it to 2.371552. Quanta Magazine, 7 Mar. 2024 Biden and his immediate successors will not be able to peel Beijing away from Moscow the way that U.S. President Richard Nixon did following his 1972 visit to China; China and Russia are too tightly bound, and both see U.S. global leadership as a threat. Max Bergmann, Foreign Affairs, 6 Mar. 2024 Abu Al-Ola’s hands remained bound, with the yellow cloth resting across his forehead. Chantal Da Silva, NBC News, 22 Feb. 2024 The brim is cut, and the edges are either welted, bound, curled, or, in some cases, left raw. Abby Montanez, Robb Report, 3 Mar. 2024
Noun
At one point, Curry stripped Derrick Jones Jr. on a spin move, but threw it out of bounds on the other end. Danny Emerman, The Mercury News, 3 Apr. 2024 Be clear that advocating for the ex is out of bounds and demeaning to you. Haben Kelati, Washington Post, 27 Mar. 2024 Institutional platforms must operate within the bounds of compliance, adhering to regulatory requirements and providing robust reporting tools. Tyler Shepherd, The Arizona Republic, 21 Mar. 2024 Unifying these film is an effort by filmmakers to move audiences outside of their comfort zones and to experiment with the perceptual bounds of documentary film. Brendel Hightower, Detroit Free Press, 13 Mar. 2024 Those who embark on such an adventure must be physically fit and have years of consistent experiences skiing in bounds and out of bounds in backcountry terrain. Melissa McGibbon, Travel + Leisure, 5 Mar. 2024 If the ball is kicked out of bounds, it will be placed at the 40. Daniel Oyefusi, Miami Herald, 27 Mar. 2024 Two minutes into the fourth quarter as the Nuggets were trying to conjure more second-unit magic, Doncic clanked a 3-pointer but chased down his own rebound in mid-air behind the baseline, chucking it off an unsuspecting opponent then out of bounds. Bennett Durando, The Denver Post, 17 Mar. 2024 To read now that Santa Clara County, on the heels of the county counsel’s egregious overstepping of their bounds in the preventable deaths of baby Phoenix and other children, now allows parents suspected of abuse to sit in on their children’s interviews is unfathomable. Letters To The Editor, The Mercury News, 8 Mar. 2024
Verb
In May, San Diego at Gloria’s behest offered for sale or lease the four blocks commonly known as the Civic Center — bounded by A Street and C Street to the north and south, and First Avenue and Third Avenue to the east and west — and a fifth block at 101 Ash St. Jennifer Van Grove, San Diego Union-Tribune, 2 Apr. 2024 One immediate beneficiary of the donations will be the Domenica Park development itself, an 18-home plan on 3.77 acres bounded by Oakland Avenue, Ellis Street and Greenfield Avenue north of East Broadway. Jim Riccioli, Journal Sentinel, 7 Feb. 2024 That phobia takes a tangible turn when Dark (recent Emmy winner Paul Walter Hauser) comes bounding out of the closet, asking (OK, insisting) that Orion spend a night with him in order to conquer what scares him. Brian Lowry, CNN, 2 Feb. 2024 His young son, Daniele, in a bright yellow jump suit, merrily bounded in, to his father’s delight. Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times, 27 Mar. 2024 About 15 minutes before first pitch, Bob Melvin bounds down the staircase from the clubhouse and passes by Williams, making his way away from the field. Evan Webeck, The Mercury News, 26 Mar. 2024 Bosa’s new condo tower will be bounded by B Street, Eighth Avenue, C Street and Ninth Avenue. Phillip Molnar, San Diego Union-Tribune, 20 Mar. 2024 The area is bounded by 20th Street, Greenfield Avenue, North Avenue, and Lake Michigan. Alison Dirr, Journal Sentinel, 18 Mar. 2024 The area is north of East Belknap Street and bounded by the Trinity River to the north, Interstate 35W to the east and Cold Spring Road to the west. Harrison Mantas, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 8 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'bound.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective (1)

Middle English bounden, from past participle of binden to bind

Adjective (2)

Middle English boun, from Old Norse būinn, past participle of būa to dwell, prepare; akin to Old High German būan to dwell — more at bower

Noun (1) and Verb (1)

Middle French bond, from bondir to leap, from Vulgar Latin *bombitire to hum, from Latin bombus deep hollow sound — more at bomb entry 1

Noun (2) and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French bounde, bodne, from Medieval Latin bodina

First Known Use

Adjective (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Adjective (2)

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun (1)

circa 1556, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

1593, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Time Traveler
The first known use of bound was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near bound

Cite this Entry

“Bound.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bound. Accessed 17 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

bound

1 of 7 adjective
: going or intending to go
bound for home
college-bound

bound

2 of 7 noun
1
: a boundary line
2
: a point or line beyond which one cannot go : limit
out of bounds
3
: the land within a boundary
usually used in plural

bound

3 of 7 verb
1
: to set limits to : confine
2
a
: to form the boundary of : enclose
b
: to lie next to
3
: to name the boundaries of

bound

4 of 7

past and past participle of bind

bound

5 of 7 adjective
1
: fastened by or as if by bands : confined
desk-bound
2
: required by law or duty
3
: having a binding
bound notebook
4
: firmly determined
we were bound we would succeed
5
: very likely to do something : certain, sure
6
: always found in combination with another word or word part (as un- in unknown and -er in speaker)

bound

6 of 7 noun
1
: a long easy leap
2

bound

7 of 7 verb
1
: to move by leaping
2
Etymology

Adjective

Middle English boun "ready"; of Norse origin

Noun

Middle English bound "boundary," from early French bodne (same meaning), from Latin bodina "boundary"

Adjective

Middle English bounden "fastened, tied," from binden "bind"

Noun

from early French bond "a leap," from bondir "to leap"

Medical Definition

bound

adjective
1
: made costive : constipated
2
: held in chemical or physical combination
bound water in a molecule

Legal Definition

bound

1 of 4 noun
1
: boundary
usually used in pl.
metes and bounds
2
: something that limits or restrains
within the bounds of the law

bound

2 of 4

past and past participle of bind

bound

3 of 4 transitive verb
: to form the boundary of or enclose
property bounded on the north by a stone wall

bound

4 of 4 adjective
: placed under a legal or moral restraint or obligation

More from Merriam-Webster on bound

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