crown

noun, often attributive
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a reward of victory or mark of honor especially : the title representing the championship in a sport
2 : a royal or imperial headdress or cap of sovereignty : diadem
3 : the highest part: such as
a : the topmost part of the skull or head
b : the summit of a mountain
c : the head of foliage of a tree or shrub
d : the part of a hat or other headgear covering the crown of the head
e : the part of a tooth external to the gum or an artificial substitute for this — see tooth illustration
4 : a wreath, band, or circular ornament for the head
5a : something resembling a wreath or crown
b : the knurled cap on top of a watch stem
6 often capitalized
a(1) : imperial or regal power : sovereignty
(2) : the government under a constitutional monarchy
7 : something that imparts splendor, honor, or finish : culmination
8a : any of several old gold coins with a crown as part of the device
b : an old usually silver British coin worth five shillings
9a : koruna
b : krona
c : krone
d : kroon
10a : the region of a seed plant at which stem and root merge
b : the arching end of the shank of an anchor where the arms join it — see anchor illustration

crown

verb
crowned; crowning; crowns

Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to place a crown or wreath on the head of specifically : to invest with regal dignity and power
b : to recognize officially as they crowned her athlete of the year
c : to award a championship to crown a new champion
2 : to bestow something on as a mark of honor or recompense : adorn
3 : surmount, top especially : to top (a checker) with a checker to make a king
4 : to bring to a successful conclusion : climax the role that crowned her career
5 : to provide with something like a crown: such as
a : to fill so that the surface forms a crown
b : to put an artificial crown on (a tooth)
6 : to hit on the head

intransitive verb

1 of a forest fire : to burn rapidly through the tops of trees
2 in childbirth : to appear and begin to emerge headfirst or crown first at the vaginal opening the baby's head crowned

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Other Words from crown

Noun

crowned \ ˈkrau̇nd How to pronounce crowned (audio) \ adjective
crownless \ ˈkrau̇n-​ləs How to pronounce crownless (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for crown

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of crown in a Sentence

Noun The winner of the beauty pageant walked down the runway wearing her sparkling crown. the blessing of the Spanish crown She was appointed by the Crown. Verb The magazine crowned her the new queen of rock-and-roll music. She crowned her long and distinguished career by designing the city's beautiful new bridge.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Employees of a company that makes moringa chips wore laurel wreath crowns meant to evoke their product. Wired, "Even in an Existential Crisis, WeWork Continues to Grow," 7 Nov. 2019 The new Disney stores at Target also feature interactive experiences for shoppers such as wearing Mickey’s magic hat, posing with a life-size light saber, and wearing a prince or princess crown. Marcia Heroux Pounds, sun-sentinel.com, "5 new reasons to shop at stores -- not just online," 7 Nov. 2019 Baylor has claimed nine straight Big 12 regular-season crowns dating back to 2011, an incredible run that include NCAA tournament titles in 2012 and 2019. Nick Moyle, Houston Chronicle, "College basketball preview: Texas women," 7 Nov. 2019 San Antonio Great Hearts Academy is looking for back-to-back crowns in Class 2A boys. David Hinojosa, ExpressNews.com, "Boerne Champion girls hope for golden return," 7 Nov. 2019 Bayern will, in the coming weeks, appoint not only a new manager — perhaps even Arsène Wenger, on a short-term basis — but crown a new president, too. Rory Smith, New York Times, "At Bayern Munich, the Bill Comes Due," 6 Nov. 2019 The National Aquarium, which receives about 1.3 million visitors yearly, is the jewel in the Inner Harbor’s crown. Debra Bruno, Washington Post, "For a better sense of Baltimore, get out of the Inner Harbor and head to Fells Point," 6 Nov. 2019 The Lions won the 2A state title last season, and claimed a 1A crown in 2016. Pat Stoetzer, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Field Hockey: For Liberty and Westminster, ‘states is everyone’s goal’," 5 Nov. 2019 Yang’s crowds have grown bigger, there’s more swag available (including paper crowns) and a press handler noted their communications operation had improved. Time, "Andrew Yang Has the ‘Yang Gang’ to Thank for His Lasting Primary Power," 5 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb More stunning still is a cozy cupola that crowns the roof. Boston.com Real Estate, "Vacation home goes green in the White Mountains," 16 Oct. 2019 At first glance, there would seem to be nothing to find in that little house of Cobb’s signature masterpiece, the gracile glass skyscraper that still crowns Boston’s skyline and is the quintessence of what design historians call high modernism. Thomas De Monchaux, The New Yorker, "Ezra Stoller Turned Buildings Into Monuments," 6 Oct. 2019 Off the small plates, the chawanmushi (Japanese egg custard; $10) was sweet, creamy, silky and gorgeous, thanks to the glossy mass of corn silk that crowned the small bowl. Allyson Reedy, The Know, "Review: The Wolf’s Tailor, named one of U.S.’ best new restaurants, is almost worthy of the honor," 2 Oct. 2019 One play later, Thorson fired the pass to Skowronek that essentially crowned the Wildcats champions of the Big Ten West. Teddy Greenstein, chicagotribune.com, "‘Certain memories you don’t forget’: 10 reasons 2018 was the wildest season in Northwestern history," 27 Aug. 2019 A week later, Paly hosts none other than Wilcox in a battle that could crown the Santa Clara Valley Athletic League De Anza champion. Vytas Mazeika, The Mercury News, "Bay Area Preps HQ football preview: No. 23 Palo Alto," 19 July 2019 Simba and Nala perched atop an ostrich that crowned a tower composed partly of zebras, giraffes, and hippos as the prince belted his anthem. Hannah Giorgis, The Atlantic, "The Uncanny Fun of the Live-Action Lion King," 11 July 2019 Why were eateries across Kolkata—and other parts of South Asia—suddenly changing the name of this dish that crowns iftar spreads during Ramzan? Shoaib Daniyal, Quartz India, "Haleem or Daleem? WhatsApp university fuels debate over Ramzan delicacy," 4 June 2019 She’s hoping to raise money to restore it and to re-create two cypress cupolas that once crowned the hall. Molly Hennessy-fiske, latimes.com, "Texas once had 1,000 dance halls. Now there’s a rush to save those that remain," 4 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'crown.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of crown

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for crown

Noun

Middle English coroune, croune, borrowed from Anglo-French corone, coroune, going back to Latin corōna "wreath, garland worn on the head as a mark of honor or emblem of majesty," borrowed from Greek korṓnē "crow, seabird (perhaps a shearwater), any of various curved or hooked objects (as a door handle or tip of a bow), kind of crown," perhaps formed from an original n-stem nominative *kor-ōn "crow, seabird," from a base *kor- — more at cornice

Note: Old English corona "crown," a weak noun borrowed directly from Latin, may have been replaced by the Anglo-French word if it was continued into Middle English at all. Ancient Greek korṓnē, though marginally attested in the meaning "crown, garland" (as something bent or curved?), is nonetheless presumed to be the source of the Latin word; aside from a gloss "kind of crown" (eîdos stephánou) by the lexicographer Hesychius, this sense is known only from a single fragment, of doubtful interpretation, by Sophron of Syracuse, a writer of mime. As both Sophron and the lyric poet Stesichorus, who used the derivative korōnís "garland," wrote in Doric, it is possible that the meaning "garland," whatever its origin, was peculiar to western dialects of Greek and hence transmitted to Latin.

Verb

Middle English corounen, crounen, borrowed from Anglo-French coroner, corouner, going back to Latin corōnare "to deck with garlands, wreath, encircle," derivative of corōna "wreathe, garland worn on the head as a mark of honor or emblem of majesty" — more at crown entry 1

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Statistics for crown

Last Updated

13 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for crown

The first known use of crown was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for crown

crown

noun
How to pronounce crown (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a decorative object that is shaped like a circle and worn on the head of a king or queen for special ceremonies
: a similar object worn by someone who is not an actual king or queen
: a ring of leaves or flowers worn on the head of someone who has won a game, contest, or award

crown

verb

English Language Learners Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

: to put a crown on (a new king, queen, etc.) : to give (someone) the power and title of a king or queen
: to officially or formally give (someone) the title or position of a champion, winner, etc.
: to end (something) in a successful and impressive way

crown

noun
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Kids Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a royal headdress
2 : a wreath or band worn especially as a symbol of victory or honor
3 : the top of the head
4 : the highest part (as of a tree or mountain)
5 often capitalized : royal power or authority, a person having such power, or the government of a country ruled by a king or queen He pledged his loyalty to the crown.
6 : any of various coins (as a British coin worth five shillings)
7 : the top part of a hat
8 : the part of a tooth outside of the gum or an artificial substitute for it

Other Words from crown

crowned \ ˈkrau̇nd \ adjective

crown

verb
crowned; crowning

Kids Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to place a royal headdress on : give the title of king or queen to
2 : to declare officially to be She was crowned champion.
3 : to cover or be situated on the top of Snow crowned the mountain.
4 : to bring to a conclusion The day was completed and crowned in a particularly satisfactory way …— Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer
5 : to put an artificial crown on a damaged tooth
6 : to hit on the head

crown

noun
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Medical Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the topmost part of the skull or head
2 : the part of a tooth external to the gum or an artificial substitute for this

Medical Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

: to put an artificial crown on (a tooth)

intransitive verb

in childbirth : to appear at the vaginal opening used of the first part (as the crown of the head) of the infant to appear an anesthetic was given when the head crowned

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