crown

noun, often attributive
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a reward of victory or mark of honor especially : the title representing the championship in a sport
2 : a royal or imperial headdress or cap of sovereignty : diadem
3 : the highest part: such as
a : the topmost part of the skull or head
b : the summit of a mountain
c : the head of foliage of a tree or shrub
d : the part of a hat or other headgear covering the crown of the head
e : the part of a tooth external to the gum or an artificial substitute for this — see tooth illustration
4 : a wreath, band, or circular ornament for the head
5a : something resembling a wreath or crown
b : the knurled cap on top of a watch stem
6 often capitalized
a(1) : imperial or regal power : sovereignty
(2) : the government under a constitutional monarchy
b : monarch
7 : something that imparts splendor, honor, or finish : culmination
8a : any of several old gold coins with a crown as part of the device
b : an old usually silver British coin worth five shillings
9a : koruna
b : krona
c : krone
d : kroon
10a : the region of a seed plant at which stem and root merge
b : the arching end of the shank of an anchor where the arms join it — see anchor illustration

crown

verb
crowned; crowning; crowns

Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to place a crown or wreath on the head of specifically : to invest with regal dignity and power
b : to recognize officially as they crowned her athlete of the year
c : to award a championship to crown a new champion
2 : to bestow something on as a mark of honor or recompense : adorn
3 : surmount, top especially : to top (a checker) with a checker to make a king
4 : to bring to a successful conclusion : climax the role that crowned her career
5 : to provide with something like a crown: such as
a : to fill so that the surface forms a crown
b : to put an artificial crown on (a tooth)
6 : to hit on the head

intransitive verb

1 of a forest fire : to burn rapidly through the tops of trees
2 in childbirth : to appear and begin to emerge headfirst or crown first at the vaginal opening the baby's head crowned

Other Words from crown

Noun

crowned \ ˈkrau̇nd How to pronounce crown (audio) \ adjective
crownless \ ˈkrau̇n-​ləs How to pronounce crown (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for crown

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of crown in a Sentence

Noun The winner of the beauty pageant walked down the runway wearing her sparkling crown. the blessing of the Spanish crown She was appointed by the Crown. Verb The magazine crowned her the new queen of rock-and-roll music. She crowned her long and distinguished career by designing the city's beautiful new bridge.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In February 2021, Deadline was the first to report that Rebel had landed the lead role of Stephanie Conway, a cheerleader who wakes up from a 20-year coma and returns to high school to claim the prom queen crown. Selena Barrientos, Good Housekeeping, 6 May 2022 So, who else could possibly snatch the crown from her? Emma Balter, Chron, 5 May 2022 The Monopusher, as its name suggests, has a single pusher that’s incorporated into the crown. Bernd Fischer, Men's Health, 5 May 2022 This is the 75th season in which the NBA and the NHL will both crown champions, and never has the same city or market won both the NBA championship and the Stanley Cup in the same season. Jeff Miller, USA TODAY, 5 May 2022 On the export side, Texas wins the crown for the most valuable export of any state —$43.5 billion of finished petroleum products. Robert Rapier, Forbes, 5 May 2022 The warm woods are echoed by the stained — not painted — hardwood trim and crown moldings and wooden ceiling beams. Mary Carole Mccauley, Baltimore Sun, 4 May 2022 Nicki Minaj wore an elevated version—leather, with an extra detail on the crown for height—with her Burberry look by Riccardo Tisci. ELLE, 4 May 2022 The City crown will likely come down to either Bishop Chatard or Cathedral. Brian Haenchen, The Indianapolis Star, 3 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb For the first time since 2020, the OSAA is getting ready to crown official state champions and the 6A Classification is loaded with heavy-hitting talent. oregonlive, 24 Feb. 2022 Throughout his decades-long political career, Russian President Vladimir Putin has amassed a fortune that some authorities believe is vast enough to crown him one of the richest people in the world. Amy Nakamura, USA TODAY, 26 Apr. 2022 At that point Sacred Heart had yet to lose to an in-state opponent, and most people were ready to crown them as the champs already. J.l. Kirven, The Courier-Journal, 21 Mar. 2022 For a second consecutive year, Premios Heat will crown the best Dominican artist, which went to El Alfa in 2021. Jessica Roiz, Billboard, 23 Mar. 2022 Emma Terry, Miss Alabama’s Outstanding Teen 2021, will crown her successor on Sunday. Mary Colurso | Mcolurso@al.com, al, 1 Mar. 2022 The Arizona high school boys soccer playoffs will crown its champions this week as the final matchups for Conferences 4A-6A are now set. Ian Garcia, The Arizona Republic, 22 Feb. 2022 The Voice will crown its season 21 winner in a matter of hours — but first, finalists Wendy Moten, Paris Winningham, Hailey Mia, Girl Named Tom and Jershika Maple are taking a look back at their journeys on the show. Brianne Tracy, PEOPLE.com, 14 Dec. 2021 But while no single method could definitively crown one city as having the best quality of life, The Chronicle made our best effort to rank the region’s 25 largest cities. Amy Coval, San Francisco Chronicle, 18 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'crown.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of crown

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for crown

Noun

Middle English coroune, croune, borrowed from Anglo-French corone, coroune, going back to Latin corōna "wreath, garland worn on the head as a mark of honor or emblem of majesty," borrowed from Greek korṓnē "crow, seabird (perhaps a shearwater), any of various curved or hooked objects (as a door handle or tip of a bow), kind of crown," perhaps formed from an original n-stem nominative *kor-ōn "crow, seabird," from a base *kor- — more at cornice

Note: Old English corona "crown," a weak noun borrowed directly from Latin, may have been replaced by the Anglo-French word if it was continued into Middle English at all. Ancient Greek korṓnē, though marginally attested in the meaning "crown, garland" (as something bent or curved?), is nonetheless presumed to be the source of the Latin word; aside from a gloss "kind of crown" (eîdos stephánou) by the lexicographer Hesychius, this sense is known only from a single fragment, of doubtful interpretation, by Sophron of Syracuse, a writer of mime. As both Sophron and the lyric poet Stesichorus, who used the derivative korōnís "garland," wrote in Doric, it is possible that the meaning "garland," whatever its origin, was peculiar to western dialects of Greek and hence transmitted to Latin.

Verb

Middle English corounen, crounen, borrowed from Anglo-French coroner, corouner, going back to Latin corōnare "to deck with garlands, wreath, encircle," derivative of corōna "wreathe, garland worn on the head as a mark of honor or emblem of majesty" — more at crown entry 1

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Time Traveler for crown

Time Traveler

The first known use of crown was in the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near crown

crowl

crown

crown's evidence

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Statistics for crown

Last Updated

9 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Crown.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/crown. Accessed 17 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for crown

crown

noun
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Kids Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a royal headdress
2 : a wreath or band worn especially as a symbol of victory or honor
3 : the top of the head
4 : the highest part (as of a tree or mountain)
5 often capitalized : royal power or authority, a person having such power, or the government of a country ruled by a king or queen He pledged his loyalty to the crown.
6 : any of various coins (as a British coin worth five shillings)
7 : the top part of a hat
8 : the part of a tooth outside of the gum or an artificial substitute for it

Other Words from crown

crowned \ ˈkrau̇nd \ adjective

crown

verb
crowned; crowning

Kids Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to place a royal headdress on : give the title of king or queen to
2 : to declare officially to be She was crowned champion.
3 : to cover or be situated on the top of Snow crowned the mountain.
4 : to bring to a conclusion The day was completed and crowned in a particularly satisfactory way …— Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
5 : to put an artificial crown on a damaged tooth
6 : to hit on the head

crown

noun
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Medical Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the topmost part of the skull or head
2 : the part of a tooth external to the gum or an artificial substitute for this

crown

transitive verb

Medical Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

: to put an artificial crown on (a tooth)

intransitive verb

in childbirth : to appear at the vaginal opening used of the first part (as the crown of the head) of the infant to appear an anesthetic was given when the head crowned

More from Merriam-Webster on crown

Nglish: Translation of crown for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of crown for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about crown

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