crown

noun, often attributive
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a reward of victory or mark of honor especially : the title representing the championship in a sport
2 : a royal or imperial headdress or cap of sovereignty : diadem
3 : the highest part: such as
a : the topmost part of the skull or head
b : the summit of a mountain
c : the head of foliage of a tree or shrub
d : the part of a hat or other headgear covering the crown of the head
e : the part of a tooth external to the gum or an artificial substitute for this — see tooth illustration
4 : a wreath, band, or circular ornament for the head
5a : something resembling a wreath or crown
b : the knurled cap on top of a watch stem

6 often capitalized

a(1) : imperial or regal power : sovereignty
(2) : the government under a constitutional monarchy
b : monarch
7 : something that imparts splendor, honor, or finish : culmination
8a : any of several old gold coins with a crown as part of the device
b : an old usually silver British coin worth five shillings
9a : koruna
b : krona
c : krone
d : kroon
10a : the region of a seed plant at which stem and root merge
b : the arching end of the shank of an anchor where the arms join it — see anchor illustration

crown

verb
crowned; crowning; crowns

Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to place a crown or wreath on the head of specifically : to invest with regal dignity and power
b : to recognize officially as they crowned her athlete of the year
c : to award a championship to crown a new champion
2 : to bestow something on as a mark of honor or recompense : adorn
3 : surmount, top especially : to top (a checker) with a checker to make a king
4 : to bring to a successful conclusion : climax the role that crowned her career
5 : to provide with something like a crown: such as
a : to fill so that the surface forms a crown
b : to put an artificial crown on (a tooth)
6 : to hit on the head

intransitive verb

1 of a forest fire : to burn rapidly through the tops of trees
2 in childbirth : to appear and begin to emerge headfirst or crown first at the vaginal opening the baby's head crowned

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Other Words from crown

Noun

crowned \ ˈkrau̇nd How to pronounce crowned (audio) \ adjective
crownless \ ˈkrau̇n-​ləs How to pronounce crownless (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for crown

Synonyms: Noun

chaplet, coronal (also coronel), coronet, diadem

Synonyms: Verb

cap (off), climax, culminate

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Examples of crown in a Sentence

Noun

The winner of the beauty pageant walked down the runway wearing her sparkling crown. the blessing of the Spanish crown She was appointed by the Crown.

Verb

The magazine crowned her the new queen of rock-and-roll music. She crowned her long and distinguished career by designing the city's beautiful new bridge.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And for good reason—there'd be too many people trying to kill him for the crown, and Jon would have to break off his already troubled relationship with Daenerys. Ineye Komonibo, Marie Claire, "Will Sansa Take the Iron Throne in 'Game of Thrones'?," 7 May 2019 But Commey emerged from his bout Feb. 2 with an injured right hand, and Lomachenko elected to stay active by entertaining his mandatory challenger for the WBA crown. Greg Beacham, The Seattle Times, "Lomachenko goes Hollywood for title clash with Crolla," 11 Apr. 2019 The video clearly shows forcible contact: Gustin leads with the crown of his helmetinto the facemask of a defenseless player — the very definition of targeting. Jon Wilner Pac-12 Hotline, The Seattle Times, "Pac-12 Power Rankings Week 5: Huskies back on top, and the fumbling of a targeting non-call vs. WSU," 1 Oct. 2018 Franklin won a $50,000 scholarship along with the crown in the first Miss America pageant to be held without a swimsuit competition. Fox News, "New Miss America is glad she didn't have to wear swimsuit to win," 10 Sep. 2018 The crib is topped with a crown, and a matching bassinet features the same color scheme, with a giant sparkly bow in the front. Temi Adebowale, House Beautiful, "You Need to See The Insane Crib Cardi B Got for Her Baby's Nursery," 18 July 2018 In its protest against culinary subtlety, Pizza Hut took a large pizza, surrounded it with a crown of 28 tiny hot dogs, sort of pigs-in-a-blanket style, and served it with mustard. Tiffany Hsu, New York Times, "Meat Wrapped in Meat. Doughnut Sandwiches. Want Some of Fast Food’s Big Ideas?," 22 June 2018 Payton charged at me with the crown of his head to plow into my chest or head. Larry Holder, NOLA.com, "Safety, skepticism come with NFL's crown of the helmet rule," 6 June 2018 At birth, Victoria was fifth in the line of succession for the British crown, behind the four eldest sons of George III, including her three uncles and her father, Edward. Chanel Vargas, Town & Country, "15 Fascinating Facts You Didn't Know About Queen Victoria," 8 Jan. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The identities of the Bee, the Peacock, and the Monster were all revealed, and a winner was crowned—but not everyone agrees with the results. Jennifer Aldrich, Country Living, "‘The Masked Singer’ Fans Are Furious That Gladys Knight Was 'Robbed' in the Finale," 1 Mar. 2019 Bain & Company monthly reviews Source: WSJ analysis of Glassdoor data Management consulting firm Bain & Co., which was recently crowned Glassdoor’s best place to work for 2019, has ranked first or second for several years. Andrea Fuller, WSJ, "How Companies Secretly Boost Their Glassdoor Ratings," 22 Jan. 2019 There, in one of stadium’s underground hallways, Darvish said what has stayed with him over the last seven months are the looks on the faces of his teammates after the Houston Astros were crowned World Series champions. Dylan Hernandez, latimes.com, "Yu Darvish returns to Dodger Stadium carrying a lot of baggage," 27 June 2018 The winners from 11 contestants were crowned by the departing representatives, 2017 Miss Ramona Emily Payne and 2017 Teen Miss Ramona Cheyenne Dephilippis. Julie Gallant, Ramona Sentinel, "Megan Kelly crowned 2018 Miss Ramona," 10 July 2018 The busy exceptions are a network of medieval towns crowned by 12th-century Moorish castles, set on the banks of the Júcar River, which carved wondrous canyons through limestone hills. Eric Asimov, New York Times, "The Grape From Manchuela," 21 June 2018 The entrance, a glass box crowned by a steel disc, is on the second floor. Janet Eastman, OregonLive.com, "Portland's most expensive house for sale is surprising (photos)," 3 June 2018 Doused in a warm peach compote and popcorn, the cake was crowned by a ball of sweet corn gelato. Lauren Delgado, OrlandoSentinel.com, "11 dishes to try before Epcot's Flower and Garden Festival ends," 22 May 2018 The Frankfurt coach, who has agreed to take over from the retiring Jupp Heynckes in Munich next season, oversaw a committed performance from his side crowned by two goals from the impressive Ante Rebic. Ciaran Fahey, chicagotribune.com, "Kovac, Frankfurt upset Bayern to win German Cup," 19 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'crown.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of crown

Noun

12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for crown

Noun

Middle English coroune, croune, borrowed from Anglo-French corone, coroune, going back to Latin corōna "wreath, garland worn on the head as a mark of honor or emblem of majesty," borrowed from Greek korṓnē "crow, seabird (perhaps a shearwater), any of various curved or hooked objects (as a door handle or tip of a bow), kind of crown," perhaps formed from an original n-stem nominative *kor-ōn "crow, seabird," from a base *kor- — more at cornice

Note: Old English corona "crown," a weak noun borrowed directly from Latin, may have been replaced by the Anglo-French word if it was continued into Middle English at all. Ancient Greek korṓnē, though marginally attested in the meaning "crown, garland" (as something bent or curved?), is nonetheless presumed to be the source of the Latin word; aside from a gloss "kind of crown" (eîdos stephánou) by the lexicographer Hesychius, this sense is known only from a single fragment, of doubtful interpretation, by Sophron of Syracuse, a writer of mime. As both Sophron and the lyric poet Stesichorus, who used the derivative korōnís "garland," wrote in Doric, it is possible that the meaning "garland," whatever its origin, was peculiar to western dialects of Greek and hence transmitted to Latin.

Verb

Middle English corounen, crounen, borrowed from Anglo-French coroner, corouner, going back to Latin corōnare "to deck with garlands, wreath, encircle," derivative of corōna "wreathe, garland worn on the head as a mark of honor or emblem of majesty" — more at crown entry 1

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Statistics for crown

Last Updated

15 May 2019

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Time Traveler for crown

The first known use of crown was in the 12th century

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More Definitions for crown

crown

noun

English Language Learners Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a decorative object that is shaped like a circle and worn on the head of a king or queen for special ceremonies
: a similar object worn by someone who is not an actual king or queen
: a ring of leaves or flowers worn on the head of someone who has won a game, contest, or award

crown

verb

English Language Learners Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

: to put a crown on (a new king, queen, etc.) : to give (someone) the power and title of a king or queen
: to officially or formally give (someone) the title or position of a champion, winner, etc.
: to end (something) in a successful and impressive way

crown

noun
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Kids Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a royal headdress
2 : a wreath or band worn especially as a symbol of victory or honor
3 : the top of the head
4 : the highest part (as of a tree or mountain)
5 often capitalized : royal power or authority, a person having such power, or the government of a country ruled by a king or queen He pledged his loyalty to the crown.
6 : any of various coins (as a British coin worth five shillings)
7 : the top part of a hat
8 : the part of a tooth outside of the gum or an artificial substitute for it

Other Words from crown

crowned \ ˈkrau̇nd \ adjective

crown

verb
crowned; crowning

Kids Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to place a royal headdress on : give the title of king or queen to
2 : to declare officially to be She was crowned champion.
3 : to cover or be situated on the top of Snow crowned the mountain.
4 : to bring to a conclusion The day was completed and crowned in a particularly satisfactory way …— Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer
5 : to put an artificial crown on a damaged tooth
6 : to hit on the head

crown

noun
\ ˈkrau̇n How to pronounce crown (audio) \

Medical Definition of crown

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the topmost part of the skull or head
2 : the part of a tooth external to the gum or an artificial substitute for this

Medical Definition of crown (Entry 2 of 2)

: to put an artificial crown on (a tooth)

intransitive verb

in childbirth : to appear at the vaginal opening used of the first part (as the crown of the head) of the infant to appear an anesthetic was given when the head crowned

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More from Merriam-Webster on crown

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for crown

Spanish Central: Translation of crown

Nglish: Translation of crown for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of crown for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about crown

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