bring

verb
\ ˈbriŋ \
brought\ ˈbrȯt \; bringing\ ˈbriŋ-​iŋ \

Definition of bring

transitive verb

1a : to convey, lead, carry, or cause to come along with one toward the place from which the action is being regarded brought a bottle of wine to the party
b : to cause to be, act, or move in a special way: such as
(1) : attract her screams brought the neighbors
(2) : persuade, induce try to bring them to his way of thinking
(3) : force, compel was brought before a judge
(4) : to cause to come into a particular state or condition bring water to a boil
c dialect : escort, accompany May I bring you home?
d : to bear as an attribute or characteristic brings years of experience to the position
2 : to cause to exist or occur: such as
a : to be the occasion of winter brings snow
b : to result in the drug brought immediate relief brought tears to her eyes
c : institute bring legal action
d : adduce bring an argument
3 : prefer whether to bring legal charges against him
4 : to procure in exchange : sell for should bring a high price at auction

intransitive verb

chiefly Midland : yield, produce
bring forth
1 : bear brought forth fruit
2 : to give birth to : produce
3 : adduce bring forth persuasive arguments
bring forward
1 : to produce to view : introduce brought new evidence forward
2 : to carry (a total) forward
bring home
: to make unmistakably clear brought home the importance of exercise
bring to account
1 : to bring to book must be brought to account for her mistakes
2 : reprimand
bring to bear
: to use with effect bring pressure to bear
bring to book
: to compel to give an account
bring to light
: disclose, reveal bring new facts to light
bring to mind
: recall These events bring to mind another time in history.
bring to terms
: to compel to agree, assent, or submit
bring up the rear
: to come last or behind

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Other Words from bring

bringer noun

Examples of bring in a Sentence

“Should I send you a check?” “Why not just bring me the money when you come?” Have you brought the money with you from the bank? She brought her boyfriend home to meet her parents. Love of adventure brought her here before taking her to many other places. This radio station brings you all the news as it happens. Can anything bring peace to this troubled region? Having a baby has brought great happiness into her life.
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Recent Examples on the Web

In a year that brought bad news and more bad news, Bodys Isek Kingelez’s brik-brak fantasy models at MoMA were shots of pure joy. Mark Lamster, Curbed, "2018 in architecture: The good, the bad, and the urbanism," 27 Dec. 2018 Plus, as this project brings together one of the world's favorite musicals with one of the greatest living humans, the track is an instant winner. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Barack Obama Appears on a New Hamilton Remix Alongside Lin-Manuel Miranda," 22 Dec. 2018 If there’s one event that brings festive cheer and good spirits all around it’s ACRIA’s annual holiday dinner. Vogue, "Acria’s Annual Holiday Dinner Brings Out Sasha Velour and Stephanie’s Child," 14 Dec. 2018 Maintaining the good plank position described above, slide your feet apart and then immediately bring them together again. Jenny Mccoy, SELF, "All You Need Is a Pair of Socks to Do This 15-Minute Total-Body Workout From Carrie Underwood’s Trainer," 13 Dec. 2018 Long criticized for reusing old cores in its recent CPUs, Intel on Wednesday showed off a new 10nm Sunny Cove core that will bring faster single-threaded and multi-threaded performance along with major speed bumps from new instructions. Gordon Mah Ung, PCWorld, "Surprise! Intel reveals 10nm Sunny Cove CPU cores that go deeper, wider, and faster," 12 Dec. 2018 Knut is a great host and really brings all the people together at the table, and the chef was spectacular. Matt Hranek, Condé Nast Traveler, "How to Visit Norway, According To Two Design Insiders," 3 Dec. 2018 Mids are crisp and clear, the highs can grab your attention, and while the bass is on the tamer side, there’s still a satisfying low rumble with enough gravitas to bring life to a Metro Boomin production. Stefan Etienne, The Verge, "Razer Hammerhead USB-C ANC review: easy isolation," 20 Dec. 2018 The Spanish monarch brought modern polish to the ensemble by accessorizing with Magrit heels and a Herrera python-effect clutch. Edward Barsamian, Vogue, "Queen Letizia of Spain’s Latest Look Is Handed Down From Her Mother-in-Law," 19 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bring.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bring

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for bring

Middle English, from Old English bringan; akin to Old High German bringan to bring, Welsh hebrwng to accompany

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Statistics for bring

Last Updated

10 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bring

The first known use of bring was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for bring

bring

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bring

: to come with (something or someone) to a place

: to cause (something or someone) to come

: to cause (something) to exist, happen, or start

bring

verb
\ ˈbriŋ \
brought\ ˈbrȯt \; bringing

Kids Definition of bring

1 : to cause to come by carrying or leading : take along Students were told to bring lunches. Bring all your friends!
2 : to cause to reach a certain state or take a certain action Bring the water to a boil. I couldn't bring myself to say it.
3 : to cause to arrive or exist Their cries brought help. The storm brought snow and ice.
4 : to sell for The house brought a high price.
bring about
: to cause to happen
bring back
: to cause to return to a person's memory Seeing him brought it all back to me.
bring forth
: to cause to happen or exist : produce Her statement brought forth protest.
bring on
: to cause to happen to You've brought these problems on yourself.
bring out
1 : to produce and make available The manufacturer brought out a new model.
2 : to cause to appear His friends bring out the best in him.
bring to
: to bring back from unconsciousness : revive
bring up
1 : to bring to maturity through care and education bring up a child
2 : to mention when talking bring up a subject

Other Words from bring

bringer noun
\ ˈbriŋ \
brought\ ˈbrȯt \; bringing\ ˈbriŋ-​iŋ \

Legal Definition of bring

: to begin or commence (a legal proceeding) through proper legal procedure: as
a : to put (as a lawsuit) before a court
b : to formally assert (as a charge or indictment) brought charges against him

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More from Merriam-Webster on bring

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bring

Spanish Central: Translation of bring

Nglish: Translation of bring for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bring for Arabic Speakers

Comments on bring

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