bring

verb
\ ˈbriŋ How to pronounce bring (audio) \
brought\ ˈbrȯt How to pronounce brought (audio) \; bringing\ ˈbriŋ-​iŋ How to pronounce bringing (audio) \

Definition of bring

transitive verb

1a : to convey, lead, carry, or cause to come along with one toward the place from which the action is being regarded brought a bottle of wine to the party
b : to cause to be, act, or move in a special way: such as
(1) : attract her screams brought the neighbors
(2) : persuade, induce try to bring them to his way of thinking
(3) : force, compel was brought before a judge
(4) : to cause to come into a particular state or condition bring water to a boil
c dialect : escort, accompany May I bring you home?
d : to bear as an attribute or characteristic brings years of experience to the position
2 : to cause to exist or occur: such as
a : to be the occasion of winter brings snow
b : to result in the drug brought immediate relief brought tears to her eyes
c : institute bring legal action
d : adduce bring an argument
3 : prefer whether to bring legal charges against him
4 : to procure in exchange : sell for should bring a high price at auction

intransitive verb

chiefly Midland : yield, produce
bring forth
1 : bear brought forth fruit
2 : to give birth to : produce
3 : adduce bring forth persuasive arguments
bring forward
1 : to produce to view : introduce brought new evidence forward
2 : to carry (a total) forward
bring home
: to make unmistakably clear brought home the importance of exercise
bring to account
1 : to bring to book must be brought to account for her mistakes
2 : reprimand
bring to bear
: to use with effect bring pressure to bear
bring to book
: to compel to give an account
bring to light
: disclose, reveal bring new facts to light
bring to mind
: recall These events bring to mind another time in history.
bring to terms
: to compel to agree, assent, or submit
bring up the rear
: to come last or behind

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Other Words from bring

bringer noun

Examples of bring in a Sentence

“Should I send you a check?” “Why not just bring me the money when you come?” Have you brought the money with you from the bank? She brought her boyfriend home to meet her parents. Love of adventure brought her here before taking her to many other places. This radio station brings you all the news as it happens. Can anything bring peace to this troubled region? Having a baby has brought great happiness into her life.
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Recent Examples on the Web

In what is probably one of the most anticipated of Disney’s live-actions, the Lion King promises to bring beloved scenes and characters to life. Sophia Caraballo, Woman's Day, "The New 'Lion King' Trailer Introduces the Villainous Scar," 10 Apr. 2019 March 2017 In a March 2017 episode of Keeping Up With the Kardashians, Khloé surprised her family by bringing Tristan along to a Kanye West concert to meet everyone. Nicole Saunders, Harper's BAZAAR, "A Definitive Timeline of Khloé Kardashian and Tristan Thompson's Relationship," 21 Feb. 2019 The problems in midfield, for example, could have been resolved far earlier by bringing Adrien Rabiot back into the side. Jerome Pugmire, The Seattle Times, "PSG fans have cause to worry ahead of Manchester United game," 10 Feb. 2019 The second was the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule, which sought to bring teeth to a provision in the Fair Housing Act of 1968 that went largely ignored for decades. Jeff Andrews, Curbed, "HUD won one court battle, lost another under Ben Carson in 2018," 26 Dec. 2018 What couldn’t be anticipated was the window that was opened on the vibrant energy and social activism of young designers who’d been brought together from Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Qatar, Tunisia, and UAE. Sarah Mower, Vogue, "Fashion Trust Arabia Spotlights the Visionary Fashion Voices of the Middle East and North Africa," 1 Apr. 2019 All hope was not lost, though, as fate brought the couple together again when the two ended up in the same town at the same time. Tamara Fuentes, Country Living, "Luke Bryan and His Wife Caroline Boyer Have the Most Relatable Love Story," 28 Mar. 2019 Those kinds are articles are already available for free on the existing Apple News app, which brings together articles from around the web. Tali Arbel, The Seattle Times, "Newspapers largely shun Apple’s news subscription service," 27 Mar. 2019 Even her eyebrows have been tinted a light auburn shade to bring the look together. Marci Robin, Allure, "Nicole Kidman Just Made a Triumphant Return to Red Hair, and She Looks Incredible," 15 Mar. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bring.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of bring

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for bring

Middle English, from Old English bringan; akin to Old High German bringan to bring, Welsh hebrwng to accompany

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Statistics for bring

Last Updated

18 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for bring

The first known use of bring was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for bring

bring

verb

English Language Learners Definition of bring

: to come with (something or someone) to a place
: to cause (something or someone) to come
: to cause (something) to exist, happen, or start

bring

verb
\ ˈbriŋ How to pronounce bring (audio) \
brought\ ˈbrȯt \; bringing

Kids Definition of bring

1 : to cause to come by carrying or leading : take along Students were told to bring lunches. Bring all your friends!
2 : to cause to reach a certain state or take a certain action Bring the water to a boil. I couldn't bring myself to say it.
3 : to cause to arrive or exist Their cries brought help. The storm brought snow and ice.
4 : to sell for The house brought a high price.
bring about
: to cause to happen
bring back
: to cause to return to a person's memory Seeing him brought it all back to me.
bring forth
: to cause to happen or exist : produce Her statement brought forth protest.
bring on
: to cause to happen to You've brought these problems on yourself.
bring out
1 : to produce and make available The manufacturer brought out a new model.
2 : to cause to appear His friends bring out the best in him.
bring to
: to bring back from unconsciousness : revive
bring up
1 : to bring to maturity through care and education bring up a child
2 : to mention when talking bring up a subject

Other Words from bring

bringer noun
\ ˈbriŋ How to pronounce bring (audio) \
brought\ ˈbrȯt How to pronounce brought (audio) \; bringing\ ˈbriŋ-​iŋ How to pronounce bringing (audio) \

Legal Definition of bring

: to begin or commence (a legal proceeding) through proper legal procedure: as
a : to put (as a lawsuit) before a court
b : to formally assert (as a charge or indictment) brought charges against him

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More from Merriam-Webster on bring

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for bring

Spanish Central: Translation of bring

Nglish: Translation of bring for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bring for Arabic Speakers

Comments on bring

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an act or instance of returning to life

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