bring to trial

idiom

: to put into a situation in which evidence is presented in a court to a judge and often a jury to decide if one is guilty of a crime
He was arrested but not brought to trial.

Examples of bring to trial in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web He was acquitted after the jury deliberated less than eight hours in a case that took six years to bring to trial. Maria Puente, USA TODAY, 18 Aug. 2021 But Ukraine’s prosecutor general Andriy Kostin has vowed to investigate all of them and to bring to trial all those in which enough evidence can be gathered. Liz Sly, Anchorage Daily News, 30 Jan. 2023 But Ukraine’s prosecutor general, Andriy Kostin, has vowed to investigate all of them and to bring to trial all those in which enough evidence can be gathered. Liz Sly, Washington Post, 29 Jan. 2023 Likar and others said one reason for the drop in clearance rates is that these cases have been proven exceptionally difficult to solve or bring to trial. Andy Sheehan, CBS News, 29 June 2022 But in 2008, Kelly was acquitted of those charges by a jury that deliberated less than eight hours over a case that took six years to bring to trial. Cydney Henderson, USA TODAY, 11 Aug. 2021

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'bring to trial.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Dictionary Entries Near bring to trial

Cite this Entry

“Bring to trial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bring%20to%20trial. Accessed 22 May. 2024.

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