mistrial

noun
mis·​tri·​al | \ ˈmis-ˌtrī(-ə)l How to pronounce mistrial (audio) \

Definition of mistrial

: a trial that has no legal effect with regard to one or more of the charges brought against the defendant because of some serious error or prejudicial misconduct in the proceedings or a hung jury

Examples of mistrial in a Sentence

The judge declared a mistrial.
Recent Examples on the Web Patituce objected and asked Synenberg to declare a mistrial. Cory Shaffer, cleveland, 18 May 2021 In that case, the judge told the jury only to avoid coverage of that specific case, and when protests broke out over a new police killing in nearby Brooklyn Center, the defense asked the court to declare a mistrial. William Morris, USA TODAY, 17 May 2021 That statement itself is fodder for appeal, appearing to indicate that the decision not to declare a mistrial was close. Jeannie Suk Gersen, The New Yorker, 21 Apr. 2021 If jurors can’t reach agreement, a judge can declare a mistrial, after which the prosecution would have to decide whether to retry Mr. Chauvin. Jacob Gershman, WSJ, 19 Apr. 2021 The jury also deadlocked on the deprivation of rights charge against former officer Dustin Boone, leading the judge to declare a mistrial on counts where the jury could not agree. BostonGlobe.com, 30 Mar. 2021 The jury also deadlocked on the deprivation of rights charge against former officer Dustin Boone, leading the judge to declare a mistrial on counts where the jury could not agree. NBC News, 30 Mar. 2021 The jury also deadlocked on the deprivation of rights charge against former Officer Dustin Boone, leading the judge to declare a mistrial on counts where the jury could not agree. CBS News, 30 Mar. 2021 Although Cora’s husband was charged with murder, he was set free after a mistrial. Liz Szabo, USA TODAY, 30 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mistrial.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mistrial

1628, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for mistrial

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The first known use of mistrial was in 1628

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Statistics for mistrial

Last Updated

17 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Mistrial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mistrial. Accessed 21 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for mistrial

mistrial

noun

English Language Learners Definition of mistrial

law : a trial that is not valid because of an error or because the jury is unable to decide a verdict

mistrial

noun
mis·​tri·​al | \ ˈmis-ˌtrī-əl How to pronounce mistrial (audio) \

Legal Definition of mistrial

: a trial that terminates without a verdict because of error, necessity, prejudicial misconduct, or a hung jury — see also manifest necessity — compare dismissal sense 2, trial de novo

More from Merriam-Webster on mistrial

Nglish: Translation of mistrial for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mistrial for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about mistrial

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