trial

noun
tri·​al | \ ˈtrī(-ə)l How to pronounce trial (audio) \

Definition of trial

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : the formal examination before a competent tribunal of the matter in issue in a civil or criminal cause in order to determine such issue
2a : the action or process of trying or putting to the proof : test
b : a preliminary contest (as in a sport)
3a : a tryout or experiment to test quality, value, or usefulness — compare clinical trial
b : one of a number of repetitions of an experiment
4 : a test of faith, patience, or stamina through subjection to suffering or temptation broadly : a source of vexation or annoyance
5 : attempt

trial

adjective

Definition of trial (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : of, relating to, or used in a trial
2 : made or done as a test or experiment
3 : used or tried out in a test or experiment

trial

verb
trialed or trialled; trialing or trialling; trials

Definition of trial (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to test the functioning, value, or usefulness of (something) In 2014, Germany trialed a copyright law granting publishers licensing fees for quoted content.— Kim Willsher So a raft of demonstration projects around the world have trialled "smart grids" that deal with electricity flowing in two directions—accommodating individuals selling power back to the utility company operation …— Caroline Williams

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Synonyms for trial

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Adjective

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Examples of trial in a Sentence

Noun He did not get a fair trial. He testified at the trial. She is awaiting trial on charges of assault. Early trials have shown that the treatment has some serious side effects. Recovering from her injury was a real trial of strength. I know I was a bit of a trial to my parents when I was a teenager. Cold winters can be a trial for older people. Adjective trial use of the product If you choose to use the software beyond the 30-day free trial period, you are required to pay for it.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Murkowski was a critic of Trump throughout his administration, and was one of seven Republican senators to vote to convict him in February during his second Senate impeachment trial. Brooke Singman, Fox News, "Alaska's Murkowski to face GOP challenge from state official Kelly Tshibaka," 29 Mar. 2021 Chauvin's attorney says his trial isn't about race. N'dea Yancey-bragg, USA TODAY, "George Floyd's death was traumatizing for Black teens in Minneapolis. They fear the trial will be just as painful.," 29 Mar. 2021 On the evening of March 24, AstraZeneca announced its Covid-19 vaccine is 76 percent effective at preventing symptomatic disease, based on its Phase III trial of over 32,000 participants mostly in the United States. Theresa Machemer, Smithsonian Magazine, "Why the FDA Is Taking Its Time to Approve the AstraZeneca Covid-19 Vaccine," 29 Mar. 2021 By a 2-to-1 margin, the Maine Republican Party’s state committee voted Saturday against a censure of U.S. Sen. Susan Collins over her vote last month to convict former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial. Author: Eric Russell Portland Press Herald, Anchorage Daily News, "Maine Republicans reject censure of Collins over Trump impeachment vote," 28 Mar. 2021 In its large-scale trial, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was shown to prevent 95% of symptomatic COVID-19, just 1 percentage point more than Moderna's. USA Today, "Comparing the COVID-19 vaccines," 27 Mar. 2021 Williams represented the three remaining men during their trial in Lake County. Monivette Cordeiro, orlandosentinel.com, "Attorney who defended Groveland Four honored with bust at Wells’ Built Museum," 26 Mar. 2021 Those problems date back to September, when AstraZeneca paused its trial to investigate whether a volunteer who showed symptoms of spinal inflammation became sick because of the vaccine. San Diego Union-Tribune, "AstraZeneca’s vaccine seems safe and effective, but miscues worry researchers," 26 Mar. 2021 In one of my favorite vaccine stats, 38% of people who got the AstraZeneca vaccine in their Phase 3 trial reported a side effect (other than arm pain). Andy Larsen, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Comparing the COVID-19 vaccines: If you have a choice, which one should you get?," 26 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Random sampling used in the analysis should account for outlying situations where someone’s extensive criminal history might account for longer pre-trial jails stay, Chevrier said. Peter Krouse, cleveland, "Longer jail stays pretrial result in greater chance of conviction, Ohio ACLU concludes," 16 Mar. 2021 Legal professionals who have followed the pre-trial filings and maneuverings say that even with that stunning and difficult-to-watch visual evidence, the case against Chauvin is anything but a slam dunk. Alex Perez, ABC News, "The legal landscape of the Derek Chauvin trial," 8 Mar. 2021 The reforms, which only kicked in in October, replaced the bail model — posting cash or a bond to gain pre-trial freedom — with one based on risk of a defendant committing new crimes or fleeing. The Salt Lake Tribune, "The legislative session is over. Here’s what lawmakers did for you — and to you — before going home.," 7 Mar. 2021 That willingness to trial new solutions can fuel stronger interest in ag tech and ag- and animal health-biotech innovations. Michael Helmstetter, Forbes, "Positive Ag Cycle Brings Cash. Can It Also Bring New Social Impact To Ag Tech?," 3 Mar. 2021 In a pre-trial hearing, a Superior Court judge threw out Michael’s confession, Houser’s statement, and most of Treadway’s confession, ruling they had been illegally coerced or not prefaced with the necessary Miranda warnings. John Wilkens, San Diego Union-Tribune, "‘Haunted’ by the Crowe murder case, defense attorney proposes Children’s Bill of Rights," 6 Mar. 2021 Her home was raided on the same day, and she was held in pre-trial detention for over a month. Lydia Belanger, Fortune, "These 11 women journalists deserve freedom and justice now," 2 Mar. 2021 Her home was raided on the same day, and she was held in pre-trial detention for over a month. Wired Staff, Wired, "One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack," 1 Mar. 2021 Her home was raided on the same day, and she was held in pre-trial detention for over a month. Forbes Press Releases, Forbes, "Detained Syrian Journalist Tal Al-Mallohi Tops March Ranking Of One Free Press Coalition’s “10 Most Urgent” Press Freedom Cases," 1 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trial.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trial

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

Adjective

1555, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1971, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for trial

Noun

Anglo-French, from trier to try

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Time Traveler for trial

Time Traveler

The first known use of trial was in the 15th century

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Statistics for trial

Last Updated

31 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Trial.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trial. Accessed 10 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for trial

trial

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trial

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a formal meeting in a court in which evidence about crimes, disagreements, etc., is presented to a judge and often a jury so that decisions can be made according to the law
: a test of the quality, value, or usefulness of something
: a test of someone's ability to do something that is used to see if he or she should join a team, perform in a play, etc.

trial

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of trial (Entry 2 of 3)

: relating to or used in a test that is done for a period of time to see if something is worth buying, using, etc.

trial

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trial (Entry 3 of 3)

British : to test the quality, value, or usefulness of (something)

trial

noun
tri·​al | \ ˈtrī-əl How to pronounce trial (audio) \

Kids Definition of trial

1 : the hearing and judgment of something in court
2 : a test of someone's ability to do or endure something
3 : an experiment to test quality, value, or usefulness
4 : the action or process of trying or testing

trial

noun
tri·​al | \ ˈtrī(-ə)l How to pronounce trial (audio) \

Medical Definition of trial

1 : a tryout or experiment to test quality, value, or usefulness — see clinical trial
2 : one of a number of repetitions of an experiment

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trial

noun
tri·​al

Legal Definition of trial

: a judicial examination of issues of fact or law disputed by parties for the purpose of determining the rights of the parties — compare hearing, inquest
at trial
: in or during the course of a trial

History and Etymology for trial

Anglo-French, from trier to try

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Comments on trial

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