mistrust

noun
mis·trust | \ˌmis-ˈtrəst \

Definition of mistrust 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a lack of confidence : distrust

mistrust

verb
mistrusted; mistrusting; mistrusts

Definition of mistrust (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to have no trust or confidence in : suspect mistrusted his neighbors

2 : to doubt the truth, validity, or effectiveness of mistrusted his own judgment

3 : surmise your mind mistrusted there was something wrong— Robert Frost

intransitive verb

: to be suspicious

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Other Words from mistrust

Noun

mistrustful \-fəl \ adjective
mistrustfully \-fə-lē \ adverb
mistrustfulness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for mistrust

Noun

uncertainty, doubt, dubiety, skepticism, suspicion, mistrust mean lack of sureness about someone or something. uncertainty may range from a falling short of certainty to an almost complete lack of conviction or knowledge especially about an outcome or result. assumed the role of manager without hesitation or uncertainty doubt suggests both uncertainty and inability to make a decision. plagued by doubts as to what to do dubiety stresses a wavering between conclusions. felt some dubiety about its practicality skepticism implies unwillingness to believe without conclusive evidence. an economic forecast greeted with skepticism suspicion stresses lack of faith in the truth, reality, fairness, or reliability of something or someone. regarded the stranger with suspicion mistrust implies a genuine doubt based upon suspicion. had a great mistrust of doctors

Examples of mistrust in a Sentence

Noun

She has a strong mistrust of politicians. had an unfortunate mistrust of doctors, so her medical condition was allowed to worsen

Verb

I was starting to mistrust my own judgment. a recluse who mistrusts her neighbors and stays in her house all day
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But the worst precedent would be letting mistrust and partisan suspicion persist over how law enforcement behaved during a presidential campaign. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "After the Strzok Stonewall," 13 July 2018 The issue has been fraught with mistrust for decades and no transfers of remains have taken place since 2005. David Nakamura, chicagotribune.com, "Trump releases 'nice note' from Kim Jong Un praising progress despite setbacks in talks," 12 July 2018 But that goal is complicated by deep mistrust and geopolitical rivalries. Nabih Bulos, latimes.com, "It's an awkward dance as the U.S., Russia and Iran all zero in on Islamic State," 22 June 2018 But after years of settlement building, a second intifada, instability throughout the region, and the rise of absolutism on both sides, a paralyzing mistrust took hold. Adam Entous, The New Yorker, "Donald Trump’s New World Order," 11 June 2018 Simultaneously, a series of terrorist attacks, such as the assault on the offices of Charlie Hebdo and the Bataclan theater shooting, increased fear and mistrust. Annie Hylton, The New Republic, "Macron Turns His Back on Refugee Women," 24 Apr. 2018 Police have said some Asian American store owners have been targeted because they are perceived as easy victims who may not report crimes due to language barriers or a mistrust of authority. Julie Shaw, Philly.com, "He survived Cambodia's killing fields, only to be shot in West Philly by man with an AK-47," 20 June 2018 Mbemba, meanwhile, has remained on Tyneside but barely featured - understood to be due to a mistrust from Benitez over the player's ability to follow his strict and complex instructions during games. SI.com, "4 First Team Players Reportedly Set To Leave Newcastle United This Week as Summer Rebuild Begins," 6 June 2018 There also tends to be a mistrust of the medical system among African Americans, making them reluctant to seek care. Soumya Karlamangla, latimes.com, "STDs in L.A. County are skyrocketing. Officials think racism and stigma may be to blame," 7 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

This disproportionate police violence leads to mistrust of police performance in black communities, while white people feel the opposite. Michael Harriot, The Root, "All Black People Are Victims of Police Brutality," 26 June 2018 This keeps Trump's base enraged at the media and mistrusting of us. Amira Rasool, Teen Vogue, "Journalist Liz Plank Believes the Media Was Baited by Melania Trump's Zara Jacket," 22 June 2018 Many in Madrid will mistrust Mr Torra’s government as long as Mr Puigdemont, who precipitated Spain’s deepest constitutional crisis since the return of democracy in 1978, is seen to be pulling the strings. The Economist, "Catalonia’s new president is a secessionist, like the previous one," 17 May 2018 Kretz told me he had mistrusted Wielgus for a long time, since Wielgus’s initial mountain-lion studies. New York Times, "Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf Scientist?," 5 July 2018 The locals shunned newcomers and mistrusted outsiders. Roy Bragg, San Antonio Express-News, "German (and Czech) towns are baseball hotbeds," 3 June 2018 But the fraud claims have delayed the official tally of the vote and deepened Iraqis mistrust in the electoral process, which saw turnout fall to its lowest level since the country became a democracy fifteen years ago. Isabel Coles And, WSJ, "Questions Mount About Possible Fraud in Iraq Vote," 19 May 2018 The general public increasingly mistrusts big business and economic elites, and for good reason. John Benjamin, The New Republic, "Business Class," 14 May 2018 History is replete with examples of hostile acts and mistrust that each country often cites. Amy Kellogg, Fox News, "Trump could pull off a 'North Korea' with Iran, experts say," 11 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mistrust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mistrust

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

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Statistics for mistrust

Last Updated

16 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for mistrust

The first known use of mistrust was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for mistrust

mistrust

noun

English Language Learners Definition of mistrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: lack of trust or confidence : a feeling that someone is not honest and cannot be trusted

mistrust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mistrust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to have no trust or confidence in (someone or something)

mistrust

noun
mis·trust | \mis-ˈtrəst \

Kids Definition of mistrust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

mistrust

verb
mistrusted; mistrusting

Kids Definition of mistrust (Entry 2 of 2)

2 : to lack confidence in They mistrust your abilities.

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Comments on mistrust

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