disgust

noun
dis·gust | \ di-ˈskəst , dis-ˈgəst also diz- \

Definition of disgust 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: marked aversion aroused by something highly distasteful : repugnance wrinked her nose in disgust his disgust at the way the media has been covering the story

disgust

verb

Definition of disgust (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provoke to loathing, repugnance, or aversion : be offensive to The idea of eating raw meat disgusts him.

2 : to cause (one) to lose an interest or intention is disgusted by their ignorange

intransitive verb

: to cause disgust

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Other words from disgust

Verb

disgusted adjective
disgustedly adverb

Examples of disgust in a Sentence

Noun

He eyed the greasy food with disgust. As the smell of garbage drifted through the air, she wrinkled her nose in disgust. He talked about his disgust with the way the news media focuses on celebrities. Much to the disgust of some listeners, the speech was interrupted several times by a few people in the audience. She shook her head in disgust when I described the scene.

Verb

She's a vegetarian because the idea of eating meat totally disgusts her. The photographs disgust some people.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Kanye’s words came as an annoyance in a sea of disgust, pain, and fear in response to the reality of a Trump administration. Lincoln Anthony Blades, Teen Vogue, "The Myth of the "Happy Slave," Explained," 2 June 2018 Trump has expressed disgust for multilateral trade decisions and has favored more adversarial action. The Washington Post, OregonLive.com, "China hits back on U.S. tariffs, Dow falls nearly 500 points," 2 Apr. 2018 Gruen would eventually disavow his creation, expressing disgust for how malls had exacerbated rather than ameliorated urban sprawl—not to mention exporting it globally, infecting the Old World with this land-use virus of the New. Ian Bogost, The Atlantic, "When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair," 17 Feb. 2018 Microsoft markets technology that can detect faces in photos, as well as facial features like hair color, and emotions like anger or disgust, according to its website. New York Times, "Microsoft Urges Congress to Regulate Use of Facial Recognition," 13 July 2018 Darwin identified disgust in chimps, dejection in dogs, and grief in elephants. David Scharfenberg, BostonGlobe.com, "Did humans drive this polar bear insane?," 13 July 2018 Cox's style is a step beyond camp into a comedy of pure disgust; much of the film is churlishly unpleasant, but there's a core of genuine anger that gives the project an emotional validation lacking in the flabby American comedies of the early 80s. Patrick Friel, Chicago Reader, "Film / Music / Old Movies to Watch Now / On Video / Small Screen Urgh! A Music War and other punk and postpunk new wave cinema," 10 July 2018 To walk with Marfil Estrella was to feel the skin-prickling third sense that every eye in the territory was on you, with looks that showed evident disgust or desire. Alice Driver, Longreads, "The Road to Asylum," 30 June 2018 This pretty much conveys my anger and disgust regarding this week’s dominant news story. Christopher Federico, Washington Post, "Discharge, ‘Q: And Children? A: And Children’: The Week In One Song," 22 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But there are so many agents within the bureau that were disgusted by what happened. Fox News, "Gowdy faces backlash over remarks about FBI, Trump campaign," 1 June 2018 My father would be so upset and disgusted that after all these years, all that he’s fought for has been taken in vain. Abigail Simon, Time, "The Supreme Court Finally Said Her Father Was Right About Japanese Internment. But Karen Korematsu Isn't Happy," 29 June 2018 Fairfield police described as disgusting the conditions in the home, including animal and human feces spread on the floor. Ray Sanchez And Paul Vercammen, CNN, "Parents in California abuse case plead not guilty; lewd act on a child charges added against father," 24 May 2018 Chris Marino, who at least uses a name on Twitter, was disgusted too. Stefan Stevenson, star-telegram, "The best viral high school baseball video brings out worst in Internet," 12 June 2018 Just take a look at how absolutely disgusting this clip is, where NBC hosts are trashing the women in the president's life. Fox News, "Hannity: How we got to this point with North Korea," 9 June 2018 So when things erupted Thursday, White had every right to be disgusted — with McGregor and himself. Josh Peter, USA TODAY, "UFC's Dana White may talk tough, but he has been longtime enabler of Conor McGregor," 6 Apr. 2018 Seth MacFarlane said they were disgusted and embarrassed to work for a company affiliated with Fox News, which is a subsidiary of 21st Century Fox, following Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham’s recent remarks about border separations on the network. Mckenna Moore, Fortune, "Celebrities Slam Fox News' Coverage of Immigrant Border Separations," 19 June 2018 Some were disgusted with recent news stories showing how the administration took children crossing the border away from their parents, finding the practice un-Christlike. Sarah Smith, star-telegram, "Do politics belong in Southern Baptist Convention? Some say vice president's visit too divisive," 12 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'disgust.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of disgust

Noun

1598, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1616, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for disgust

Noun

see disgust entry 2

Verb

Middle French desgouster, from des- dis- + goust taste, from Latin gustus; akin to Latin gustare to taste — more at choose

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Statistics for disgust

Last Updated

18 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for disgust

The first known use of disgust was in 1598

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More Definitions for disgust

disgust

noun

English Language Learners Definition of disgust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a strong feeling of dislike for something that has a very unpleasant appearance, taste, smell, etc.

: annoyance and anger that you feel toward something because it is not good, fair, appropriate, etc.

disgust

verb

English Language Learners Definition of disgust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause (someone) to have a strong feeling of dislike for something especially because it has a very unpleasant appearance, taste, smell, etc.

of something bad, unfair, improper, etc. : to cause (someone) to feel very annoyed and angry

disgust

noun
dis·gust | \ di-ˈskəst , dis-ˈgəst \

Kids Definition of disgust

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a strong feeling of dislike or annoyance for something considered sickening or bad This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust —Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

disgust

verb
disgusted; disgusting

Kids Definition of disgust (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause to feel strong dislike or annoyance by being sickening or bad This greasy food disgusts me.

Other words from disgust

disgustedly adverb

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Comments on disgust

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