distaste

verb
dis·​taste | \ (ˌ)dis-ˈtāst \
distasted; distasting; distastes

Definition of distaste

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 archaic : to feel aversion to
2 archaic : offend, displease

intransitive verb

obsolete : to have an offensive taste

distaste

noun

Definition of distaste (Entry 2 of 2)

1a archaic : dislike of food or drink
b : aversion, disinclination a distaste for opera
2 obsolete : annoyance, discomfort

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Examples of distaste in a Sentence

Noun

“I see you still smoke,” she said with distaste. usually views abstract paintings with distaste

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Starbucks customers outside the store at the Arizona Center, Third and Van Buren Streets in downtown Phoenix, offered mixed reviews Tuesday on the company’s decision, ranging from agreement to distaste for the afternoon closure. Kimberly Rapanut, azcentral, "Phoenicians share mixed reactions to Starbucks closures for bias training," 29 May 2018 The Republican crossover votes in Alabama could largely be attributable to distaste for Moore. Eric Bradner, CNN, "How 2017's elections gave Democrats a recipe for big midterm wins," 14 Dec. 2017 As China looks ahead to a new American administration, opinions on the front-running Mrs. Clinton veer from admiration, mostly among women and civil libertarians, to distaste, mostly among male policy makers and an often nationalistic public. Didi Kirsten Tatlow, New York Times, "Hillary Clinton, as Seen Through a Chinese Prism," 10 July 2016

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

His attacks have invited comparisons to President Donald Trump’s remarks against the media, and highlighted Silicon Valley billionaires’ broader distaste for criticism. David Z. Morris, Fortune, "Elon Musk Criticizes Media by Tweeting Link to Article With Ties to Sex Cult," 27 May 2018 Conventional wisdom has it that part of Netflix’s difficulty in earning an Oscar in one of the top five categories comes from the film industry’s distaste for streaming services. Keith Phipps, The Verge, "The company’s ongoing bid for awards legitimacy is a terrific boon for its subscribers," 3 Dec. 2018 The stories also stemmed from the Russian aristocracy's general distaste for Alexandra, an outsider and the German granddaughter of Queen Victoria. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Did Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna, the Last Empress of Russia, Really Have an Affair With Rasputin?," 20 Oct. 2018 This suggests that the association is explained by conservatives’ greater distaste for foreign-sounding names. Kevin Lewis, BostonGlobe.com, "Examining liberal lattes," 22 June 2018 De Leon hopes Californian’s widespread distaste for Trump and some restlessness by liberal activists will propel him forward. Washington Post, "Fellow Democrat squeaks through primary to take on Feinstein," 7 June 2018 Courtsey This distaste for anger might seem ironic to anyone who watched two candidates on both ends of the political spectrum—Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders—wildly succeed by leveraging that exact emotion. Julie Zeilinger, Marie Claire, "The Women Who Ran...and Lost," 24 Oct. 2018 Trump has displayed a particular distaste for anything that implies international cooperation: The Trans-Pacific Partnership, the Iran deal, the Paris Climate Accords, and UNESCO are just a few multilateral agreements that he’s backed out of. Jen Kirby, Vox, "Here’s why Trump threatened to pull out of a 144-year-old postal treaty," 19 Oct. 2018 The Russians were not particularly happy with the result, and their distaste for how German unification proceeded remains part of Russia’s grievance against the West today. James Goldgeier, Washington Post, "What North and South Korea can learn from German reunification," 28 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'distaste.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of distaste

Verb

1592, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

1584, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

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Statistics for distaste

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for distaste

The first known use of distaste was in 1584

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More Definitions for distaste

distaste

noun

English Language Learners Definition of distaste

: a strong feeling of not liking someone or something

distaste

noun
dis·​taste | \ dis-ˈtāst \

Kids Definition of distaste

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More from Merriam-Webster on distaste

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with distaste

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for distaste

Spanish Central: Translation of distaste

Nglish: Translation of distaste for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of distaste for Arabic Speakers

Comments on distaste

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