cause

noun
\ ˈkȯz How to pronounce cause (audio) \

Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a reason for an action or condition : motive
b : something that brings about an effect or a result trying to find the cause of the accident
c : a person or thing that is the occasion of an action or state a cause for celebration especially : an agent that brings something about She is the cause of your troubles.
d : sufficient reason discharged for cause
2a : a ground of legal action
b : case They are paid by the cause for their expert opinions.
3 : a matter or question to be decided The city council is involved with school department causes.
4a : a principle or movement militantly defended or supported the insurgents' cause
b : a charitable undertaking for a good cause

cause

verb
caused; causing

Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to serve as a cause or occasion of cause an accident
2 : to compel by command, authority, or force caused him to resign

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Other Words from cause

Noun

causeless \ ˈkȯz-​ləs How to pronounce causeless (audio) \ adjective

Verb

causer noun

Examples of cause in a Sentence

Noun His symptoms had no apparent physical causes. She is the cause of all their problems. The medicine was prescribed without good cause. Their marriage was a cause for celebration. I can support a cause that means something to me. I'm willing to donate money as long as it's for a good cause. Verb He swerved and caused an accident. The flood caused great hardship. The illness is caused by a virus. The flood caused the town great hardship. You caused us a lot of extra work.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The circumstances surrounding Manning’s death were not immediately known and law enforcement did not state a cause of death pending toxicology results. Fox News, "California police ID body found wrapped in tarp in back of abandoned U-Haul truck," 12 Jan. 2020 Half the specimens had been logged without a known cause for the inflammation. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian Magazine, "A Shrew-Borne Virus Is Responsible for Deadly Brain Infections in Humans," 10 Jan. 2020 Ukrainian officials initially agreed but later backed away and declined to offer a cause while the investigation is going on. Anchorage Daily News, "63 Canadians among 176 killed when Boeing jet crashes near Tehran," 8 Jan. 2020 Ukrainian officials initially agreed, but later backed away and declined to offer a cause while the investigation is ongoing. Time, "176 Dead in Ukrainian 737 Plane Crash in Iran," 8 Jan. 2020 Ukrainian officials initially agreed, but later backed away and declined to offer a cause while the investigation is ongoing. Dallas News, "Ukrainian airliner crashes near Tehran, killing all 176 on board," 8 Jan. 2020 These bad actors can certainly look at the SEC’s most recent actions as a cause for celebration. Casey Michel, The New Republic, "Donald Trump’s Quiet Christmas Gift to the Kleptocrats," 6 Jan. 2020 Too much time had passed, and too many events had intervened, to make any negligence by the government a cause of her death, Spero said. Bob Egelko, SFChronicle.com, "Final lawsuit filed by SF shooting victim Kate Steinle’s parents is dismissed," 6 Jan. 2020 An autopsy didn't immediately establish a cause of death. CBS News, "Arrest made after mountain lions found eating human remains on Arizona trail," 6 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Bright streaks caused by light reflecting off them could degrade astronomical images. Alexandra Witze, Scientific American, "SpaceX Tests Black Satellite to Reduce “Megaconstellation” Threat to Astronomy," 10 Jan. 2020 These struggles that Justin was dealing with, partly caused by his fame at such a young age, probably put a large strain on the relationship. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Every Lyric That Could Possibly Be About Justin Bieber on Selena Gomez's New Album "Rare"," 10 Jan. 2020 Secondly, the large number of rotting carcasses caused by a mass mortality event will have their own environmental impacts. Abby Jones, The Conversation, "Rotting feral pig carcasses teach scientists what happens when tons of animals die all at once, as in Australia’s bushfires," 10 Jan. 2020 In 2018, the military halted a program in which U.S. planes refueled Gulf combat jets amid criticism of the civilian casualties caused by coalition air sorties. Author: John Hudson, Missy Ryan, Josh Dawsey, Anchorage Daily News, "On day US forces killed Soleimani, they launched another secret operation targeting Iranian official in Yemen," 10 Jan. 2020 Researchers have, on multiple occasions, observed gravitational waves caused by collisions between black holes throughout the universe. Jennifer Leman, Popular Mechanics, "LIGO Catches a Cosmic Battle Between Two Neutron Stars," 9 Jan. 2020 Elton John has vowed to donate $1 million to help those battling the devastation caused by the ongoing Australian bushfires that have reportedly lead to multiple human fatalities on top of an estimated 1 billion animal deaths. Joey Nolfi, EW.com, "Elton John pledges $1 million to 'heartbreaking' Australian fire relief efforts," 8 Jan. 2020 The law requires researchers to provide anesthesia or pain-relieving medication to minimize the pain or distress caused by an experiment, unless otherwise scientifically justified. Laura Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Report: 2 monkeys died, 2 injured at Texas Biomed in 2019," 8 Jan. 2020 An investigation found that in some cases, Kentucky social service officials decline to classify the deaths as caused by abuse or neglect, therefore keeping the numbers lower. Deborah Yetter, The Courier-Journal, "Attorney General Daniel Cameron pledges to help reduce Kentucky's high rate of child abuse," 7 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cause.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cause

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for cause

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin causa "judicial proceedings, interests of one side in a judicial case, plea, pretext, ground of action, motive, reason," of uncertain origin

Verb

Middle English causen, borrowed from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French causer, borrowed from Medieval Latin causāre, causārī "to plead, accuse, blame, serve as the cause of, occasion," going back to Latin causārī "to plead an action in law, plead as an excuse," derivative of causa "judicial proceedings, plea, cause entry 1"

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Time Traveler for cause

Time Traveler

The first known use of cause was in the 13th century

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Statistics for cause

Last Updated

15 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cause.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cause. Accessed 28 January 2020.

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More Definitions for cause

cause

noun
How to pronounce cause (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something or someone that produces an effect, result, or condition : something or someone that makes something happen or exist
: a reason for doing or feeling something
: something (such as an organization, belief, idea, or goal) that a group or people support or fight for

cause

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (something) happen or exist : to be the cause of (something)
: to make (someone) feel, have, or do something

cause

noun
\ ˈkȯz How to pronounce cause (audio) \

Kids Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : a person or thing that brings about a result Carelessness is the cause of many accidents.
2 : a good or good enough reason for something His return was a cause for rejoicing.
3 : something supported or deserving support a worthy cause

cause

verb
caused; causing

Kids Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make happen or exist You'll cause an accident.
\ ˈkȯz How to pronounce cause (audio) , ˈkəz \

Kids Definition of cause (Entry 3 of 3)

cause

noun

Legal Definition of cause

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that brings about an effect or result the negligent act which was the cause of the plaintiff's injury

Note: The cause of an injury must be proven in both tort and criminal cases.

actual cause
: cause in fact in this entry
but-for cause
: cause in fact in this entry
cause in fact
: a cause without which the result would not have occurred

called also actual cause, but-for cause

concurrent cause
: a cause that joins simultaneously with another cause to produce a result

called also concurring cause

— compare intervening cause and superseding cause in this entry
direct cause
: proximate cause in this entry
efficient intervening cause
: superseding cause in this entry
intervening cause
1 : an independent cause that follows another cause in time in producing the result but does not interrupt the chain of causation if foreseeable

called also supervening cause

— compare concurrent cause and superseding cause in this entry
2 : superseding cause in this entry
legal cause
: proximate cause in this entry
procuring cause
: one (as a broker) that sets in motion a continuous series of events culminating especially in the sale or leasing of real estate entitled to a commission as the procuring cause of the sale even though the listing had expired
producing cause
: an efficient, exciting, or contributing cause (as an act, practice, or event) that produces an injury which would not have occurred without it claimed that the workplace accident was a producing cause of his disability used especially in workers' compensation and consumer protection cases

Note: A producing cause lacks the element of foreseeability associated with a proximate cause, being more exclusively concerned with causation in fact.

proximate cause
: a cause that sets in motion a sequence of events uninterrupted by any superseding causes and that results in a usually foreseeable effect (as an injury) which would not otherwise have occurred

called also direct cause, legal cause

— see also Palsgraf v. Long Island Railroad Co. — compare remote cause in this entry
remote cause
: a cause that is followed by a superseding cause interrupting the chain of causation also : a cause that in ordinary experience does not lead to a particular effect — compare proximate cause in this entry
superseding cause
: an unforeseeable intervening cause that interrupts the chain of causation and becomes the proximate cause of the effect

called also efficient intervening cause, intervening cause

— compare concurrent cause and intervening cause in this entry
supervening cause
: intervening cause in this entry
2 : a reason or justification for an action or state (as belief): as
a : good cause in this entry an appeal dismissed for cause
b : just cause in this entry behavior that constitutes cause to terminate an employee

Note: The circumstances under which cause, good cause, just cause, probable cause, reasonable cause, or sufficient cause exists are determined on a case by case basis. These terms are often used interchangeably, and the distinctions between them are sometimes unclear.

good cause
: a substantial reason put forth in good faith that is not unreasonable, arbitrary, or irrational and that is sufficient to create an excuse for an act under the law unable to show good cause for failure to pay child support neglect of duty is good cause for removal of a trustee
just cause
1 : cause that a person of ordinary intelligence would consider a fair and reasonable justification for an act used especially in cases involving termination of employment and denial of unemployment benefits
2 : good cause in this entry
probable cause \ ˈprä-​bə-​bəl-​ \
1 : a reasonable ground in fact and circumstance for a belief in the existence of certain circumstances (as that an offense has been or is being committed, that a person is guilty of an offense, that a particular search will uncover contraband, that an item to be seized is in a particular place, or that a specific fact or cause of action exists) when supported by probable cause, warrantless search of vehicle may extend to every part of vehicle where objects of search might be concealedState v. Nixon, 593 N.E.2d 1210 (1992)

called also reasonable cause, sufficient cause

— compare reasonable suspicion

Note: The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution stipulates that “no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause.” Probable cause is also required for a warrantless arrest. Probable cause is an objective standard rather than a function of subjective opinion or suspicion not grounded in fact or circumstance. However, the facts or circumstances need not be of the nature of certainty necessary to establish proof in court.

2 : justification for an administrative search based on a showing that it is to be conducted in accordance with standardized nonarbitrary regulatory procedures designed to further public interest in regulatory enforcement that outweighs the intrusiveness of the search
reasonable cause
1 : probable cause in this entry also : a fact or circumstance that justifies a reasonable suspicion — compare reasonable suspicion
2 : a reason that would motivate a person of ordinary intelligence under the circumstances reasonable cause to believe abuse had occurred
3 : something (as an event or the exercise of ordinary care or prudence) that excuses or justifies failure to file a tax return on time
sufficient cause
: cause that is deemed enough to provide an excuse under the law: as
a : good cause in this entry often used in the phrase good and sufficient cause
b : probable cause in this entry
3a : a ground of a legal action tortious conduct is not a cause of divorce embraced within the statutory cause of cruel and inhuman treatmentCase & Comment
b : case questions of law…determinative of the cause then pending— R. T. Gerwatowski
4 in the civil law of Louisiana : the reason for making a contract — compare frustration sense 2

Note: Under the Louisiana Civil Code, if a contract's cause is illicit or immoral, the contract is absolutely null. If the cause fails after the contract is made (as when a leased building cannot be occupied because of a fire), the contract may either be not enforced or only partially enforced.

caused; causing

Legal Definition of cause (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to serve as the cause of the scales struck the plaintiff causing injuries for which she suesPalsgraf v. Long Island R.R. Co., 162 N.E. 99 (1928)
2 : to effect by command, authority, or force the administrator shall cause an investigation to be made

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More from Merriam-Webster on cause

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cause

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with cause

Spanish Central: Translation of cause

Nglish: Translation of cause for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cause for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cause

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