induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Definition of induce

transitive verb

1a : to move by persuasion or influence
b : to call forth or bring about by influence or stimulation
2a : effect, cause
b : to cause the formation of
c : to produce by induction induce an electric current
3 : to determine by induction specifically : to infer from particulars

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Did You Know?

Inducing is usually gentle persuasion; you may, for instance, induce a friend to go to a concert, or induce a child to stop crying. An inducement is something that might lure you to do something, though inducements are occasionally a bit menacing, like the Godfather's offer that you can't refuse. Induce also sometimes means "produce;" thus, doctors must at times induce labor in a pregnant woman. Notice that induct and induction are somewhat different from induce and inducement, though they come from the identical roots.

Examples of induce in a Sentence

The advertisement is meant to induce people to eat more fruit. No one knows what induced him to leave. Her illness was induced by overwork. They will induce labor to avoid complications.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Shellfish are resistant to the toxins but can pass them on to humans and animals who eat them, inducing paralytic shellfish poisoning. Tegan Hanlon, Anchorage Daily News, "Eating shellfish you’ve harvested yourself is risky - and can be deadly," 6 July 2019 For medical applications, scaffolds generally need to be safe for implantation, must not induce a response from the body’s immune system, be degradable and capable of supporting cell growth. Natalie R. Rubio, The Conversation, "So far cultured meat has been burgers – the next big challenge is animal-free steaks," 5 July 2019 Before that, Perez had allowed only five baserunners in six innings, scattering four hits and a walk and inducing 13 ground-ball outs, including two 6-4-3 double plays started by All-Star Game starter Polanco. John Shipley, Twin Cities, "Twins set major league home run record in Friday’s smashing of Rangers," 5 July 2019 The latter mineral helps induce a state of calm and relaxation that prepares your body for sleep and plays a role in melatonin regulation. Cynthia Sass, Mph, Health.com, "7 Healthy Late-Night Snacks," 3 July 2019 Davis, who had been struggling, struck out Chris Taylor and Russell Martin, hit Joc Pederson, then ended the game by inducing Alex Verdugo to ground out. Patrick Saunders, The Denver Post, "Rockies beat Dodgers again behind Gray, Blackmon," 29 June 2019 Some psychiatrists believe that it is therapeutically induced, and that some patients are especially susceptible to hypnotic suggestion. Kevin D. Williamson, National Review, "There’s No Such Thing as ‘Brainwashing’," 16 June 2019 Taking this idea a step further, Roberto Di Leonardo at Sapienza University of Rome has used flowing bacteria to transport small cargo; others have induced them to turn tiny gears. Quanta Magazine, "Swirling Bacteria Linked to the Physics of Phase Transitions," 16 June 2019 Precisely how they are killed and how they might be induced to regenerate is being intensively studied. San Diego Union-Tribune, "How old are your organs? Salk, UCSD mouse study finds human clues," 6 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'induce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of induce

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for induce

Middle English, from Anglo-French inducer, from Latin inducere, from in- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Statistics for induce

Last Updated

12 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for induce

The first known use of induce was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for induce

induce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of induce

somewhat formal : to cause (someone or something) to do something
: to cause (something) to happen or exist
medical : to give (a pregnant woman) special medicine in order to make her give birth : to cause (labor or birth) to begin by giving special drugs to a pregnant woman

induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Kids Definition of induce

1 : to cause to do something Her pleas induced us to give.
2 : to bring about Warm milk induces sleepiness.
3 : to produce (as an electric current) by induction
in·​duce | \ in-ˈd(y)üs How to pronounce induce (audio) \
induced; inducing

Medical Definition of induce

1 : to cause or bring about anesthesia induced by drugs : as
a(1) : to cause the embryological formation of the optic cup induces lens tissue in the adjacent ectoderm
(2) : to cause to form through embryonic induction induce ectoderm to form a neural tube
b : to cause or initiate by artificial means induced abortion induced labor
2 : to produce anesthesia in the patient was induced by a mixture of thiopental and curare

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More from Merriam-Webster on induce

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with induce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for induce

Spanish Central: Translation of induce

Nglish: Translation of induce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of induce for Arabic Speakers

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