induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Definition of induce

transitive verb

1a : to move by persuasion or influence
b : to call forth or bring about by influence or stimulation
2a : effect, cause
b : to cause the formation of
c : to produce by induction induce an electric current
3 : to determine by induction specifically : to infer from particulars

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Did You Know?

Inducing is usually gentle persuasion; you may, for instance, induce a friend to go to a concert, or induce a child to stop crying. An inducement is something that might lure you to do something, though inducements are occasionally a bit menacing, like the Godfather's offer that you can't refuse. Induce also sometimes means "produce;" thus, doctors must at times induce labor in a pregnant woman. Notice that induct and induction are somewhat different from induce and inducement, though they come from the identical roots.

Examples of induce in a Sentence

The advertisement is meant to induce people to eat more fruit. No one knows what induced him to leave. Her illness was induced by overwork. They will induce labor to avoid complications.
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Recent Examples on the Web

That formative, cringe-inducing time was filled with angst, cliques, and a whole lot of acne. Bonnie Stiernberg, Glamour, "I Wish Every Teen Girl Would Watch Hulu's PEN15," 10 Mar. 2019 The result is bone-soothing, slumber-inducing warmth, which makes the work seem wise when temperatures dive—and doubly so when the oil truck passes us by. Popular Mechanics, "When Storms Fell the Trees, Father and Son Make the Most of the Mess," 13 Oct. 2018 Star of the upcoming movie Beautiful Boy, Carell is best known for his role as cringe-inducing but well-meaning Michael Scott on the NBC television sitcom The Office. Samantha Drake, Country Living, "How Steve and Nancy Carell Have Made Their Marriage Thrive for More Than Two Decades," 13 Oct. 2018 The dancey, body roll-inducing tune is complete with a whimsical-yet-contemporary aesthetic as the members fall into dream-like scenarios. Devon Abelman, Allure, "See K-Pop Group GOT7's Best Hair and Makeup Looks from the New "Lullaby" Music Video," 17 Sep. 2018 And together, their chemistry is, at times, goosebump-inducing. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper shine in the newest version of A Star Is Born," 14 Sep. 2018 The Beto-ification of St. O’Rourke has gotten more than a little throne-inducing. Chris Stirewalt, Fox News, "St. Beto and the August altar call," 30 Aug. 2018 The first is weak sleep-inducing effect that only some people respond to. Caroline Picard, Good Housekeeping, "What You Need to Know About OTC Sleep Aids, According to Neurologists," 30 Jan. 2019 What's more: Said treatments are usually super tranquil and administered on a sleep-inducing spa table. Kaleigh Fasanella, Allure, "Six Top Aestheticians Share Their Skin-Care Routines," 23 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'induce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of induce

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for induce

Middle English, from Anglo-French inducer, from Latin inducere, from in- + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Statistics for induce

Last Updated

22 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for induce

The first known use of induce was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for induce

induce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of induce

somewhat formal : to cause (someone or something) to do something
: to cause (something) to happen or exist
medical : to give (a pregnant woman) special medicine in order to make her give birth : to cause (labor or birth) to begin by giving special drugs to a pregnant woman

induce

verb
in·​duce | \ in-ˈdüs How to pronounce induce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
induced; inducing

Kids Definition of induce

1 : to cause to do something Her pleas induced us to give.
2 : to bring about Warm milk induces sleepiness.
3 : to produce (as an electric current) by induction
in·​duce | \ in-ˈd(y)üs How to pronounce induce (audio) \
induced; inducing

Medical Definition of induce

1 : to cause or bring about anesthesia induced by drugs : as
a(1) : to cause the embryological formation of the optic cup induces lens tissue in the adjacent ectoderm
(2) : to cause to form through embryonic induction induce ectoderm to form a neural tube
b : to cause or initiate by artificial means induced abortion induced labor
2 : to produce anesthesia in the patient was induced by a mixture of thiopental and curare

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More from Merriam-Webster on induce

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with induce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for induce

Spanish Central: Translation of induce

Nglish: Translation of induce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of induce for Arabic Speakers

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