yield

verb
\ ˈyēld \
yielded; yielding; yields

Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 archaic : recompense, reward
2 : to give or render as fitting, rightfully owed, or required
3 : to give up possession of on claim or demand: such as
a : to give up (one's breath, life, or spirit) and so die
b : to surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another : hand over possession of
c : to surrender or submit (oneself) to another
d : to give (oneself) up to an inclination, temptation, or habit
e : to relinquish one's possession of (something, such as a position of advantage or point of superiority) yield precedence
4a : to bear or bring forth as a natural product especially as a result of cultivation the tree always yields good fruit
b : to produce or furnish as return this soil should yield good crops
c(1) : to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest a bond that yields 12 percent
(2) : to produce as revenue : bring in the tax is expected to yield millions
5 : to give up (a hit or run) in baseball yielded two runs in the third inning

intransitive verb

1 : to be fruitful or productive : bear, produce
2 : to give up and cease resistance or contention : submit, succumb facing an enemy who would not yield yielding to temptation
3 : to give way to pressure or influence : submit to urging, persuasion, or entreaty
4 : to give way under physical force (such as bending, stretching, or breaking)
5a : to give place or precedence : acknowledge the superiority of someone else
b : to be inferior our dictionary yields to none
c : to give way to or become succeeded by someone or something else
6 : to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly

yield

noun

Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something yielded : product especially : the amount or quantity produced or returned yield of wheat per acre
2 : the capacity of yielding produce

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Synonyms & Antonyms for yield

Synonyms: Verb

bow, cave (in), give in, submit, succumb, surrender

Synonyms: Noun

earnings, gain(s), income, incoming(s), proceeds, profit, return, revenue

Antonyms: Verb

hold off, resist

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Choose the Right Synonym for yield

Verb

yield, submit, capitulate, succumb, relent, defer mean to give way to someone or something that one can no longer resist. yield may apply to any sort or degree of giving way before force, argument, persuasion, or entreaty. yields too easily in any argument submit suggests full surrendering after resistance or conflict to the will or control of another. a repentant sinner vowing to submit to the will of God capitulate stresses the fact of ending all resistance and may imply either a coming to terms (as with an adversary) or hopelessness in the face of an irresistible opposing force. officials capitulated to the protesters' demands succumb implies weakness and helplessness to the one that gives way or an overwhelming power to the opposing force. a stage actor succumbing to the lure of Hollywood relent implies a yielding through pity or mercy by one who holds the upper hand. finally relented and let the children stay up late defer implies a voluntary yielding or submitting out of respect or reverence for or deference and affection toward another. I defer to your expertise in these matters

synonyms see in addition relinquish

Examples of yield in a Sentence

Verb

The apple trees yielded an abundant harvest. This soil should yield good crops. The seeds yield a rich oil. New methods have yielded promising results in the field. The studies yielded clear evidence. The tax is expected to yield millions. The bond yields seven percent annually. After several hours of debate, the opposition yielded. I yield the floor to the Senator from Maine. I yield to the Senator.

Noun

Our yield of wheat increased this year. The average yield per tree is about one bushel. The yield on government bonds is currently seven percent.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

On further inspection, the fossils from the South Dakota site yielded something unexpected: shark teeth. John Wenz, Popular Mechanics, "A New Shark Species Was Found in the Mud of Sue the T. Rex," 21 Jan. 2019 This yields a measure of the digitalization of every job, industry and city surveyed. Christopher Mims, WSJ, "Where You Should Move to Make the Most Money: America’s Superstar Cities," 15 Dec. 2018 Digging for resources can now yield rare, collectible artifacts, and even alien skeletons. Andrew Webster, The Verge, "No Man’s Sky’s new update makes its sci-fi worlds even more alien," 21 Nov. 2018 But the painstaking process still yields results: The remains of one victim, 26-year-old Scott Michael Johnson, were identified in July for the first time. Jennifer Peltz, The Seattle Times, "Identifying wildfire dead: DNA, and likely older methods too," 14 Nov. 2018 But under carbon policy, the same $1 yields $2.48, $3.30, and $2.52 respectively. David Roberts, Vox, "A massive new study confirms a national energy grid would pay for itself.," 3 Aug. 2018 Instead, each player yields a degree of his own freedom in service to a greater good, which in this case, is the song at hand. Randy Lewis, latimes.com, "The American ideal in music for July 4? Think Preservation Hall in New Orleans," 4 July 2018 Walking above the Hudson Yards where the trains come and go also yields a great view of the Hudson River to the west. Scott Mcmurren, Anchorage Daily News, "Surprises await when you explore the green spaces of New York City," 30 June 2018 Ultimately the book yields up a warts-and-all picture not just of Hersh but of an entire era of journalism. Staff, The Christian Science Monitor, "10 best books of June: the Monitor's picks," 14 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The 10-year yield has retreated from multiyear highs reached in November amid signs of caution from the Federal Reserve and mounting concerns that the long-running expansion could slow. Daniel Kruger, WSJ, "U.S. Government Bonds Rise on Weak Retail Sales," 14 Feb. 2019 And for three talented virtual farmers out there, 2020 will finally recognize their efforts in getting the crop yields just right. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "There's Real Money in Virtual Farming," 23 Jan. 2019 There are any number of reasons to see bonds as an attractive investment right now — including 10-year yields that are a hefty 1 percentage point above the inflation rate and a global economy that appears to be downshifting. Robert Burgess, latimes.com, "Fundamentals can't explain the beating that bonds are taking. It's all about momentum," 18 May 2018 Under current policy, $1 of investment in scenarios 2a, 2b, or 3 yields $1.26, $1.13, and $1.14 of benefits, respectively, relative to the benefits of an AC-only system. David Roberts, Vox, "A massive new study confirms a national energy grid would pay for itself.," 3 Aug. 2018 The dollar’s attractiveness can also decline if the European Central Bank and other central banks begin raising interest rates after a long period of easing, narrowing the gap between yields in the U.S. and other countries. Ira Iosebashvili, WSJ, "U.S. Dollar Posted 4.3% Gain in 2018, but Don’t Expect That in 2019," 1 Jan. 2019 The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.91 percent from 2.88 percent. Marley Jay, The Seattle Times, "Wall Street ends higher with help from tech and health care," 12 Dec. 2018 In July, Japanese blog Macotakara reported that supplier Japan Display had low yields in manufacturing the LCD panels. Shannon Liao, The Verge, "Why the iPhone XR isn’t coming out until October," 14 Sep. 2018 The yield on Turkish decade-long bonds has risen to over 20 percent and inflation is now running at over 15 percent compared to 11 percent one year ago, according to TradingEconomics. Hollie Mckay, Fox News, "Trump tariffs in retaliation for jailed American pastor send Turkey's economy plunging," 13 Aug. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'yield.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of yield

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for yield

Verb

Middle English, from Old English gieldan; akin to Old High German geltan to pay

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Statistics for yield

Last Updated

19 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for yield

The first known use of yield was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for yield

yield

noun

Financial Definition of yield

What It Is

Yield refers to the cash return to the owner of a security or investment.

How It Works

In general, yield is calculated as follows:

Periodic Cash Distributions / Total Cost of Investment = Yield

The term yield may refer to slightly different aspects of a return for variable types of investments. For example, a yield on bonds, such as the coupon yield is the annual interest paid on the principal amount of the bond. Current yield is the coupon yield on a bond at a specific point in the time before the bond maturity. A yield to maturity of a bond is the internal rate of return on a bond's cash flow, including the cost of the bonds, period payments from the bonds, if any, and the return of the principal at redemption.

[Use our Yield to Call (YTC) Calculator to measure your annual return if you hold a particular bond until its first call date.]

[Use our Yield to Maturity (YTM) Calculator to measure your annual return if you plan to hold a particular bond until maturity.]

In equities, yields on preferred shares are similar to bond yields. For example, the dividend yield is the total payments in a year from the preferred shares divided by the principal value of the preferred shares. The current yield refers to the annual payments divided by the current market price.

Why It Matters

While yields of various investments do not explain the reasons for the gains and losses, they may mask declines in the underlying value of the assets or the effects of inflation. Using the yield is a convenient way of comparing the returns on various financial investments.

Source: Investing Answers

yield

verb

English Language Learners Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to produce or provide (something, such as a plant or crop)
: to produce (something) as a result of time, effort, or work
: to produce (a profit, an amount of money, etc.)

yield

noun

English Language Learners Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

: the amount of something that is produced by a plant, farm, etc.
: the profit made from an investment

yield

verb
\ ˈyēld \
yielded; yielding

Kids Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to give (something) over to the power or control of another : surrender The troops would not yield the fort to the enemy.
2 : to give in He yielded to temptation.
3 : to produce as a natural product These trees yield fruit.
4 : to produce or give back as interest or profit The investment yielded eight percent annually.
5 : to be productive : bring good results The studies yielded proof of the theory.
6 : to stop opposing or objecting to something Jenner would not yield to my point of view, nor would I to his.— Robert C. O'Brien, Rats of NIMH
7 : to give way under physical force so as to bend, stretch, or break The rope yielded under the strain.
8 : to allow another person or vehicle to go first

yield

noun

Kids Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the amount produced or returned The high yield of wheat per acre increased.
2 : return entry 2 sense 7 The yield on government bonds is five percent.

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\ ˈyēld \

Legal Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest an account that yields 6 percent

intransitive verb

1 : to give place or precedence (as to one having a superior right or claim)
2 : to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly yield to the senator from Maine

yield

noun

Legal Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : agricultural production especially per acre of crop
2 : the return on a financial investment usually expressed as a percentage of cost the bond yield was 8 percent

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More from Merriam-Webster on yield

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with yield

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for yield

Spanish Central: Translation of yield

Nglish: Translation of yield for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of yield for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about yield

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