yield

1 of 2

verb

yielded; yielding; yields

transitive verb

1
a
: to bear or bring forth as a natural product especially as a result of cultivation
the tree always yields good fruit
b
: to produce or furnish as return
this soil should yield good crops
c(1)
: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest
a bond that yields 12 percent
(2)
: to produce as revenue : bring in
the tax is expected to yield millions
2
: to give up possession of on claim or demand: such as
a
: to surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another : hand over possession of
b
: to give (oneself) up to an inclination, temptation, or habit
c
: to relinquish one's possession of (something, such as a position of advantage or point of superiority)
yield precedence
d
: to surrender or submit (oneself) to another
e
: to give up (one's breath, life, or spirit) and so die
3
: to give or render as fitting, rightfully owed, or required
4
: to give up (a hit or run) in baseball
yielded two runs in the third inning
5
archaic : recompense, reward

intransitive verb

1
: to give way to pressure or influence : submit to urging, persuasion, or entreaty
2
: to give up and cease resistance or contention : submit, succumb
facing an enemy who would not yield
yielding to temptation
3
: to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly
4
: to give way under physical force (such as bending, stretching, or breaking)
5
a
: to give place or precedence : acknowledge the superiority of someone else
b
: to be inferior
our dictionary yields to none
c
: to give way to or become succeeded by someone or something else
6
: to be fruitful or productive : bear, produce

yield

2 of 2

noun

1
: something yielded : product
especially : the amount or quantity produced or returned
yield of wheat per acre
2
: the capacity of yielding produce
Choose the Right Synonym for yield

yield, submit, capitulate, succumb, relent, defer mean to give way to someone or something that one can no longer resist.

yield may apply to any sort or degree of giving way before force, argument, persuasion, or entreaty.

yields too easily in any argument

submit suggests full surrendering after resistance or conflict to the will or control of another.

a repentant sinner vowing to submit to the will of God

capitulate stresses the fact of ending all resistance and may imply either a coming to terms (as with an adversary) or hopelessness in the face of an irresistible opposing force.

officials capitulated to the protesters' demands

succumb implies weakness and helplessness to the one that gives way or an overwhelming power to the opposing force.

a stage actor succumbing to the lure of Hollywood

relent implies a yielding through pity or mercy by one who holds the upper hand.

finally relented and let the children stay up late

defer implies a voluntary yielding or submitting out of respect or reverence for or deference and affection toward another.

I defer to your expertise in these matters

synonyms see in addition relinquish

Example Sentences

Verb The apple trees yielded an abundant harvest. This soil should yield good crops. The seeds yield a rich oil. New methods have yielded promising results in the field. The studies yielded clear evidence. The tax is expected to yield millions. The bond yields seven percent annually. After several hours of debate, the opposition yielded. I yield the floor to the Senator from Maine. I yield to the Senator. Noun Our yield of wheat increased this year. The average yield per tree is about one bushel. The yield on government bonds is currently seven percent. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
In 1855, for example, electing a speaker took two months and 133 ballots to yield Representative Nathaniel P. Banks of Massachusetts the winner, a reflection of a House divided by antebellum factions. Catie Edmondson, New York Times, 30 Dec. 2022 Efforts to stop existing nuclear power plants from shutting down are likely to yield greater climate dividends, at least in the short term. Sammy Rothstaff Writer, Los Angeles Times, 29 Dec. 2022 This is a single bet a sports bettor can make to yield a large potential payout. cleveland, 27 Dec. 2022 Most of the narrative centers on O’Fuarain and Brown, who manage to yield fairly good chemistry – squabbling at first, before growing closer – given the limited scope of the characters. Brian Lowry, CNN, 22 Dec. 2022 These investments are expected to yield more profit over the long term. Q.ai - Powering A Personal Wealth Movement, Forbes, 20 Dec. 2022 But these referrals aren't likely to yield results by the House Ethics Committee, which will have a GOP chair next year although the House Ethics Committee is the only House committee that has an equal number of Democrats and Republicans. Kathryn Watson, CBS News, 19 Dec. 2022 The result is said to yield a rich, full-bodied crema. Rachel Klein, Popular Mechanics, 19 Dec. 2022 These stocks aim to yield higher rates of return over long periods of time compared to preferred stocks. Kaitlyn Koterbski, Fortune, 19 Dec. 2022
Noun
The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, rose to 3.88% from 3.82% late Thursday. Arkansas Online, 31 Dec. 2022 The yield on the 10-Year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, rose to 3.88% from 3.82% late Thursday. Dallas News, 30 Dec. 2022 The yield on the 10-Year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, rose to 3.88% from 3.82%. CBS News, 30 Dec. 2022 The yield on the benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury note rose to 3.865%, from 3.857% Tuesday. Caitlin Mccabe, WSJ, 28 Dec. 2022 The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, rose to 3.85% from 3.75% late Friday. Alex Veiga, Chicago Tribune, 27 Dec. 2022 The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, rose to 3.74% from 3.69 late Thursday. Damian J. Troise, ajc, 23 Dec. 2022 The yield on the two-year U.S. Treasury, which tends to track expectations for Fed action, rose to 4.25% from 4.22% late Wednesday. Damian J. Troise, Fortune, 22 Dec. 2022 The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, rose to 3.49 percent from 3.45 percent late Thursday. Alex Veiga, BostonGlobe.com, 16 Dec. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'yield.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English, from Old English gieldan; akin to Old High German geltan to pay

First Known Use

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 5

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of yield was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near yield

Cite this Entry

“Yield.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/yield. Accessed 27 Jan. 2023.

Kids Definition

yield

1 of 2 verb
1
: to give up possession of on claim or demand : surrender
2
: to give oneself up to a liking, temptation, or habit
3
a
: to bear as a natural product
trees that yield fruit
b
: to produce as a result of effort
this soil should yield good crops
c
: to return as profit or interest
4
: to bring good results
5
: to give up and stop fighting
will not yield to their enemy
6
: to give way to urging, persuasion, or pleading
7
: to give way under physical force so as to bend, stretch, or break
8
: to admit that someone else is better
yielder
ˈyēl-dər
noun

yield

2 of 2 noun
: something yielded : product
especially : the amount or quantity produced or returned
a high yield of wheat per acre

Legal Definition

yield

1 of 2 transitive verb
: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest
an account that yields 6 percent

intransitive verb

1
: to give place or precedence (as to one having a superior right or claim)
2
: to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly
yield to the senator from Maine

yield

2 of 2 noun
1
: agricultural production especially per acre of crop
2
: the return on a financial investment usually expressed as a percentage of cost
the bond yield was 8 percent

More from Merriam-Webster on yield

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