yield

verb
\ ˈyēld How to pronounce yield (audio) \
yielded; yielding; yields

Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to bear or bring forth as a natural product especially as a result of cultivation the tree always yields good fruit
b : to produce or furnish as return this soil should yield good crops
c(1) : to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest a bond that yields 12 percent
(2) : to produce as revenue : bring in the tax is expected to yield millions
2 : to give up possession of on claim or demand: such as
a : to surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another : hand over possession of
b : to give (oneself) up to an inclination, temptation, or habit
c : to relinquish one's possession of (something, such as a position of advantage or point of superiority) yield precedence
d : to surrender or submit (oneself) to another
e : to give up (one's breath, life, or spirit) and so die
3 : to give or render as fitting, rightfully owed, or required
4 : to give up (a hit or run) in baseball yielded two runs in the third inning
5 archaic : recompense, reward

intransitive verb

1 : to give way to pressure or influence : submit to urging, persuasion, or entreaty
2 : to give up and cease resistance or contention : submit, succumb facing an enemy who would not yield yielding to temptation
3 : to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly
4 : to give way under physical force (such as bending, stretching, or breaking)
5a : to give place or precedence : acknowledge the superiority of someone else
b : to be inferior our dictionary yields to none
c : to give way to or become succeeded by someone or something else
6 : to be fruitful or productive : bear, produce

yield

noun

Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : something yielded : product especially : the amount or quantity produced or returned yield of wheat per acre
2 : the capacity of yielding produce

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Synonyms & Antonyms for yield

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for yield

Verb

yield, submit, capitulate, succumb, relent, defer mean to give way to someone or something that one can no longer resist. yield may apply to any sort or degree of giving way before force, argument, persuasion, or entreaty. yields too easily in any argument submit suggests full surrendering after resistance or conflict to the will or control of another. a repentant sinner vowing to submit to the will of God capitulate stresses the fact of ending all resistance and may imply either a coming to terms (as with an adversary) or hopelessness in the face of an irresistible opposing force. officials capitulated to the protesters' demands succumb implies weakness and helplessness to the one that gives way or an overwhelming power to the opposing force. a stage actor succumbing to the lure of Hollywood relent implies a yielding through pity or mercy by one who holds the upper hand. finally relented and let the children stay up late defer implies a voluntary yielding or submitting out of respect or reverence for or deference and affection toward another. I defer to your expertise in these matters

synonyms see in addition relinquish

Examples of yield in a Sentence

Verb The apple trees yielded an abundant harvest. This soil should yield good crops. The seeds yield a rich oil. New methods have yielded promising results in the field. The studies yielded clear evidence. The tax is expected to yield millions. The bond yields seven percent annually. After several hours of debate, the opposition yielded. I yield the floor to the Senator from Maine. I yield to the Senator. Noun Our yield of wheat increased this year. The average yield per tree is about one bushel. The yield on government bonds is currently seven percent.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Parton, blending these legacies, dreamed up a dazzling future that only sweat, effort, and determination could yield. Parton’s account of her life is short on judgment but long on lessons. Lauren Michele Jackson, The New Yorker, "The United States of Dolly Parton," 12 Oct. 2020 Martinez-Aguilar was in the passenger seat of an SUV when he and the girl were pulled over Sept. 9 after failing to yield to a police vehicle, according to a police report obtained by the station. Fox News, "Drunken Texas man charged after letting 13-year-old stepdaughter drive him for ice cream: report," 1 Oct. 2020 In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection. courant.com, "Community news for the Enfield edition," 17 Sep. 2020 Cal Fire officials asked people to remain alert of fire activity in the area, and to drive slow and yield to first responders in the area. Chronicle Staff, SFChronicle.com, "California Wildfires: Live updates from August 27-28," 30 Aug. 2020 Law enforcement officials recommend that motorists approaching the intersection slow down and yield to pedestrians or vehicles approaching from the left before entering. Paul Stenquist, Star Tribune, "Our love-hate (but mostly hate) relationship with roundabouts," 28 Aug. 2020 Law enforcement officials recommend that motorists approaching the intersection slow down and yield to pedestrians or vehicles approaching from the left before entering. Paul Stenquist, New York Times, "All About Roundabouts," 20 Aug. 2020 The Big Ten won't play football this fall because of concerns about COVID-19, becoming the first of college sports' power conferences to yield to the pandemic. Ralph D. Russo, Houston Chronicle, "Big Ten pulls plug on fall football amid COVID-19 concerns," 11 Aug. 2020 The Big Ten won't play football this fall because of concerns about COVID-19, becoming the first of college sports' power conferences to yield to the pandemic. Ralph Russo, Anchorage Daily News, "Big Ten becomes first major college conference to cancel football season," 11 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 0.72% from 0.74% late Tuesday despite a report showing that inflation at the wholesale level strengthened more than economists expected last month. Stan Choe, USA TODAY, "Stocks drift on Wall Street following mixed earnings news," 14 Oct. 2020 Meanwhile, with more central banks willing to contemplate negative interest rates, the picture is not going to get any brighter for investors looking for yield. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "The Capital Note: Interest Rates at Four Thousand Year Lows (What Could Go Wrong?)," 13 Oct. 2020 The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 0.75% from 0.78% late Monday. Arkansas Online, "Stocks drop after Trump calls off talks on economic stimulus," 6 Oct. 2020 In bond markets, the yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 0.643%, from 0.661% on Monday. Anna Hirtenstein, WSJ, "U.S. Stocks Slip Ahead of First Trump-Biden Debate," 29 Sep. 2020 Never mind that the wave of central-bank stimulus and investors’ hunger for yield had lifted developing-nation dollar debt for five months. Netty Idayu Ismail, Bloomberg.com, "Emerging Markets on Edge as Goldman and Deutsche Bank Flag Risks," 27 Sep. 2020 With a recent forward-looking price-to-earnings ratio in the single digits, and a dividend yield topping 3.3%, CVS Health deserves consideration for long-term portfolios. Dallas News, "Motley Fool: CVS has been nimble during the pandemic," 27 Sep. 2020 Experts estimated the underground explosion had a yield of more than 100 kilotons, roughly 6 times more powerful than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Jamie Mcintyre, Washington Examiner, "Trump’s year of living dangerously: How the US came scarily close to war with North Korea in 2017," 24 Sep. 2020 Now investors are looking for yield in non-traditional places, including, apparently, in shares of bankrupt companies (ahem Hertz) and in luxury goods and collectibles formerly possible only for the ultra-wealthy. Lucinda Shen, Fortune, "How a bottled-water founder became the richest man in China (for a moment)," 8 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'yield.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of yield

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 5

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for yield

Verb

Middle English, from Old English gieldan; akin to Old High German geltan to pay

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Time Traveler for yield

Time Traveler

The first known use of yield was before the 12th century

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Statistics for yield

Last Updated

18 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Yield.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/yield. Accessed 21 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for yield

yield

verb
How to pronounce yield (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to produce or provide (something, such as a plant or crop)
: to produce (something) as a result of time, effort, or work
: to produce (a profit, an amount of money, etc.)

yield

noun

English Language Learners Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

: the amount of something that is produced by a plant, farm, etc.
: the profit made from an investment

yield

verb
\ ˈyēld How to pronounce yield (audio) \
yielded; yielding

Kids Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to give (something) over to the power or control of another : surrender The troops would not yield the fort to the enemy.
2 : to give in He yielded to temptation.
3 : to produce as a natural product These trees yield fruit.
4 : to produce or give back as interest or profit The investment yielded eight percent annually.
5 : to be productive : bring good results The studies yielded proof of the theory.
6 : to stop opposing or objecting to something Jenner would not yield to my point of view, nor would I to his.— Robert C. O'Brien, Rats of NIMH
7 : to give way under physical force so as to bend, stretch, or break The rope yielded under the strain.
8 : to allow another person or vehicle to go first

yield

noun

Kids Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the amount produced or returned The high yield of wheat per acre increased.
2 : return entry 2 sense 7 The yield on government bonds is five percent.
\ ˈyēld How to pronounce yield (audio) \

Legal Definition of yield

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to produce as return from an expenditure or investment : furnish as profit or interest an account that yields 6 percent

intransitive verb

1 : to give place or precedence (as to one having a superior right or claim)
2 : to relinquish the floor of a legislative assembly yield to the senator from Maine

yield

noun

Legal Definition of yield (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : agricultural production especially per acre of crop
2 : the return on a financial investment usually expressed as a percentage of cost the bond yield was 8 percent

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Comments on yield

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