income

noun
in·​come | \ ˈin-ˌkəm also ˈin-kəm or ˈiŋ-kəm \

Definition of income

1 : a coming in : entrance, influx fluctuations in the nutrient income of a body of water
2 : a gain or recurrent benefit usually measured in money that derives from capital or labor also : the amount of such gain received in a period of time has an income of $30,000 a year

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Examples of income in a Sentence

Any income from investments must be reported. Farming is his main source of income. Even on two incomes, we're having a hard time keeping up with our bills. He earns a good income as a consultant. What was the company's annual income?
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Recent Examples on the Web

Eighty-three years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had a new plan for tackling income inequality. Jason Zweig, WSJ, "FDR Weighs In on the Buyback Debate," 8 Feb. 2019 Last year, the firm topped Louisville Business First’s list of top public relation firms, with the outlet listing the firm’s 2016 net fee income as $3,310,000. Kate Storey, Town & Country, "Behind the PR Machine That Helped Change the Nick Sandmann Narrative," 25 Jan. 2019 As if the touring, music, and perfumes weren't enough, Grande also earned income from a year-long contract with Reebok, which was first announced in September 2017. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Ariana Grande Is All About Her Money in "7 Rings." Here's Where She Gets It All From.," 19 Jan. 2019 Yang has observed that the only way to prevent more Trump-like electoral upsets in the future is to replace the income of people whose jobs that are being zapped up by automation (so everyone, basically). Cady Drell, Marie Claire, "Everybody Running for President in 2020," 18 Jan. 2019 Workers’ rights groups have zeroed in on the tipped minimum wage as one culprit in America’s growing income inequality. Alexia Fernández Campbell, Vox, "DC repealed a ballot measure giving restaurant workers a raise. But it might be back.," 12 Dec. 2018 He, like other creators who have voiced their frustrations, are mostly confused about where that income and additional $70 million in funding went. Julia Alexander, The Verge, "YouTube creators blindsided by major network’s collapse," 5 Dec. 2018 Workers in the tourism industry, for instance, would likely see their incomes decline in a cashless world. Town & Country, "Is This the End of Cash?," 28 Jan. 2019 Colgate-Palmolive reported fourth-quarter net income of $606 million, up 88% from the comparable quarter a year ago. Allison Prang, WSJ, "Colgate-Palmolive’s Sales Decline," 25 Jan. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'income.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of income

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Statistics for income

Last Updated

15 Feb 2019

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Time Traveler for income

The first known use of income was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for income

income

noun

Financial Definition of income

What It Is

Income is an actual or recorded inflow of cash or other assets. The term is used in many different contexts.

How It Works

Let's say John Doe works for Company XYZ. His salary is $100,000 per year. This is his income.

If the inflation rate is 3% per year, then the value of that $100,000 falls by 3% a year as goods and services get more expensive. As a result, after the first year on the job, John's salary is really only able to buy $100,000 – (3% * $100,000) = $97,000 of goods and services. In year two, John's salary is then only worth $97,000 – (3% * $97,000) = $94,090. The longer this goes on, the less John's $100,000 salary buys. By the end of five years, John's salary would be "worth" only $85,873. His "real income" is $85,873.

Gross income is income before taxes or adjustments. In the accounting world, gross income is usually the same thing as gross profit (that is, revenue minus cost of goods sold). So let's assume restaurant chain XYZ sold $1 million worth of food last year. The cost of that food was $330,000. Thus, the company's gross income was $1,000,000 - $330,000 = $670,000.

For individuals, gross income is not the same as taxable income. For example, if John makes $1,000 a week and uses $250 of that to invest in his 401(k) plan, his gross income would be $1,000 but his taxable income would be $750.

Ordinary income is income that is not a capital gain, dividend or other income subject to special taxation.

In the United States, income is taxed progressively, meaning that there are a series of brackets in which income is taxed. For example, in 2006, the first $7,550 of ordinary income reported by a single person was taxed at 10%; then the income over $7,550 but below $30,650 was taxed at 15%. The income over $30,650 but below $74,200 was taxed at 25%; the income over $74,200 but below $154,800 was taxed at 28%; and the income over $154,800 but below $336,550 was taxed at 33%. Any income over $336,550 was taxed at 35%.

Why It Matters

Wages are the most common kinds of income. "Unearned income," such as capital gains, is taxed at different rates, as are dividends. Interest income is sometimes exempt from ordinary income taxes (as in the case of most municipal bond investments). Dividends paid to the shareholders of a company are another kind of income, and those investors might even rely on those dividend payments for their day-to-day living expenses. Dividends usually come in the form of cash, but they can come in the form of stock, which can also be regarded as income for tax purposes.

Knowing how taxes on income affect one's portfolio can make a big difference in investing decisions. For example, one big advantage to owning dividend stocks is their generally favorable tax treatment. Until 2003, dividends were taxed as ordinary income -- up to 38.6% -- and capital gains were taxed at a much lower 20%. In 2003, the tax on most dividend income and some capital gains fell to 15%. Not only did this encourage companies to increase dividends, it encouraged stock ownership because interest income from Treasuries and money market funds were still taxed as ordinary income.

Source: Investing Answers

income

noun

English Language Learners Definition of income

: money that is earned from work, investments, business, etc.

income

noun
in·​come | \ ˈin-ˌkəm \

Kids Definition of income

: a gain usually in money that comes in from labor, business, or property

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income

noun
in·​come

Legal Definition of income

: a gain or recurrent benefit usually measured in money that derives from capital or labor also : the amount of such gain received in a period of time an income of $20,000 a year

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More from Merriam-Webster on income

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with income

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for income

Spanish Central: Translation of income

Nglish: Translation of income for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of income for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about income

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